Tag Archives: Saku Koivu

Habs Edged In L.A.

I was up slightly earlier today so I could see on the scoreboard and PVR how the Habs did in L.A., after a 10:30 pm ET start that was way past my bedtime.

I see that the boys dropped a 2-1 decision to the Kings after Jeff Carter scored the go-ahead goal with Ryan White in the box for holding.

I was curious to see if it was a dumb penalty so I had a quick look. White hauled down Trevor Lewis in a race to the puck and it could’ve been avoided, as most White penalties can.

P.K. Subban’s goal in the first period that evened things at one wasn’t a hard blast, just a wrist shot from the point that banked in off Jarret Stoll’s skate.

Random Notes:

The Kings outshot the Canadiens 22-18.

You probably didn’t miss much if you were sleeping, although I watched the third period and there were some close calls at both ends. But when you look at the shots, you’ll see –
1st. Habs 5  Kings 5
2nd. Habs 5  Kings 8
3rd. Habs 8  Kings 9

So not a barnburner to say the least.

Now it’s slightly east on a dreadful freeway to take on the Anaheim Ducks on Wednesday at 10:00 pm ET.

The Ducks, featuring Ryan Getzlaf, Corey Perry, Teemu Selanne, Saku Koivu etc. The number one team in the NHL with 91 points. (Montreal has 75).

Toronto lost 2-1 to Columbus.

 

 

 

The Night MT Blew His Team’s Chances

Michel Therrien, as you know, coached the Canadiens once before, from 2000-01, when he replaced Alain Vigneault after 20 games, to part way through the 2002-03 season when he was fired and the team brought in Claude Julien.

That first season under Therrien saw the Canadiens miss the playoffs after going 23-27-13 under him.

The third season saw him fired after a dismal stretch that saw the Canadiens lose ten of twelve games.

But it was the middle year of Therrien’s reign, 2001-02, and in particular the second round of the playoffs, that became the saddest state of affairs.

The team, with a tremendously hot Jose Theodore in nets and a heroic Saku Koivu, who had returned to the team just prior to the post season after his fight with cancer, had upset the favoured Bruins in the first round and met the Carolina Hurricanes in the second round.

Montreal would jump into a 2-1 series lead against the Hurricanes, and were leading 3-0 in the third period of game four when Therrien decided to yell at referee Kerry Fraser when the Habs were already a man short.

Fraser gave Therrien a bench minor for being mouthy, and it was downhill from there.

The Hurricanes scored on the 5 on 3, rallied and won 4-3 in overtime, and then clobbered the Canadiens 5-1 and 8-2 to eliminate Therrien and his deflated players.

Carolina would eventually lose in five games to Detroit in the Stanley Cup Finals after taking out the Maple Leafs in six games in the Eastern Final.

It could’ve been Montreal taking out the Leafs if it wasn’t for Therrien.

It could’ve been Montreal in the finals against Detroit, and although they would’ve been in tough against a team that boasted the likes of Shanahan, Fedorov, Hull, Yzerman, Lidstrom, Robitaille and the rest, at least they would’ve been in the finals, something that hasn’t happened since 1993 when they won it all.

But Therrien screwed it up.

Here’s Kerry Fraser’s explanation of the Therrien bench minor, from a 2011 TSN story.

“The bench penalty that put Montreal down two men was a turning point in the series for sure. The Habs were cruising along at the midway point of the third period and Therrien was feeling pretty good about himself and their chances, all decked out in his bright yellow sports coat. (I mention this because you couldn’t miss him behind the bench.)

“As the Carolina Hurricanes attacked the Montreal goal, Habs defenseman Stephane Quintal  delivered a heavy cross-check to the back of the upper shoulder/neck of a Cane with such force that it knocked the player clear into the back of the net. I was the trailing referee and called it from an open sightline at the blue line. It was an obvious infraction and Quintal went right to the penalty box.

“I was standing at the referee crease, about 90 feet as the crow flies from the Canadiens bench, assessing the penalty when I heard Coach Therrien screaming at me. I turned to see Therrien standing on top of the boards, like a big yellow bumble bee buzzing his wings up and down and hollering, “Kerry, what the *&^%$?”  At this point I really didn’t want to assess a bench penalty to put his team down two men so I thought I would give him a second chance. I pointed to my chest and mouthed the words, “Are you talking to me?”  Therrien nodded his head and shouted for the second time, “Yeah, what the &^%$?” I guess he wanted to make sure I got the point, even on the second attempt.”

 

 

Fine Finnish Habs Fan

I first started to see Jarno Tauvo’s comments on Hockey Inside/Out, and I’m very grateful to learn that he comes here too.

And when I learned that he did, I contacted him because I was interested in knowing the path he took in becoming a solid Habs fan.

Below is Jarno, from Turku, Finland, who wrote back and explained.

Jarno

“My native language is Finnish, but the lovely woman who lives with me speaks Swedish. So we speak mixed Finn and Swedish at home. Mostly the person who starts to speak first chooses the language (and she speaks a lot).

“It’s quite common here in Turku to speak Swedish too, this is a bilingual city, only 160 kilometers from Stockholm (Sweden), and luckily we have that narrow sea between us.  So most Swedes understand to stay on their side. My father didn’t, he went to study to Sweden in the 60’s, but was wise enough to come back.

“You asked how I became a Habs fan. Well…
It’s not easy to explain, but I’ll try.

“I was born in 1972.
When I was a child, everybody in Finland followed only skiing or ski jumping. At summertime,  long distance runners were our heroes. News from NHL was normally a week old, if there was any at all. I remember reading different hockey books at the library wondering how cool it looked to play hockey in the NHL.

“Ice hockey was (and still is) quite an expensive sport to have as a hobby. I have to admit I was a fortunate one, because my parents could afford to pay my hockey hobby.

“That was the time when every Finnish boy was a huge fan of Jari Kurri and Esa Tikkanen in Edmonton. I talked with my father about hockey and the NHL. He told (lied probably) me that Gretzky wears #99 only in honour to the greatest ever, #9, you know who.  He also told me that Montreal Canadiens are the only real hockey team that has been around almost as long as hockey has existed and it is the reason why there is that game of hockey I like to play and watch. That’s probably the moment when I started to search for information about Habs.

“I was extremely happy when Jyrki Lumme was drafted by Montreal. It was at the time when Finnish television aired only Stanley Cup finals. Almost through the whole 90’s, it was the only the Finals we could see. So I’ve seen the Avalanches, Red Wings and Devils ‘domination. Before the internet I had seen only one Habs’ Final game, vs the Kings.

“I became a real “Hardcore Habs fan” when Saku moved from Turku to Montreal. I’m the same age as the older Kiprusoff brother, Marko, who had a short stint there too. He was almost my childhood neighbour. Those were the days when a Finnish hockey legend Timo Nummelin lived in the same building with our family. He has a son Petteri Nummelin, who has played a lot with Team Finland. Petteri plays still in the Finnish elite league “Liiga” at age of 41.

“Suddenly one cable television company from Sweden started to air NHL in Finland too and I had to purchase their package. The only bad thing was that Detroit and Colorado had too many Swedes, so they showed mostly their games. On a plus side, Toronto had Sundin and they played often against the Habs. Thanks to Sundin, I saw those games and a game here and there.

“One of my biggest emotions in a hockey game was to watch Saku’s comeback game vs. Ottawa. Live. I sat on a couch, eyes full of tears, amazed by the standing ovation the Bell Centre gave to him. Then I was sure that being a fan of the Montreal Canadiens means much more than just supporting a team. It is a worldwide community. At the same time when the Bell Centre was celebrating Saku’s comeback from cancer, I lived the same emotions at home, wiping tears and screaming when Craig Rivet scored and rushed to the bench to hug the captain.

“I’m not sure how I became a fan, but maybe that isn’t so rare not to know? As an example, my hometown has a two hockey teams. TPS and TuTo. TPS is like the Habs in Finland. Finns say about Finnish hockey: Game lasts for 60 minutes and at the end TPS wins. Although the last couple of seasons they have been suffering. Finland is a small country with only a little more than 5 million people here and the NHL-players from TPS include the Koivu brothers, Kiprusoff brothers, Jani Hurme, Jere Lehtinen, Kimmo Timonen (started here as pro) Joni Ortio, Rasmus Ristolainen, etc…

“But still my hometown favourite team is TuTo. I don’t know why. They are not a bad rival, because TuTo plays in second highest level. But it’s small and nice team where everybody knows each other.
It’s cool that I work a little with them too. I’m a photographer and I’ve taken their group photos and commercial photos. My photo studio is also a minor sponsor to them… It’s nice that they play well and are the best team in their league, but still. When Habs win, Habs win. TuTo’s headcoach is Artturi Lehkonen’s dad, Ismo Lehkonen. He kept joking about my Habs’s shirt to me, when I was shooting their group photo.

“Here’s some shots from Turku, Finland. The big and old building is the church which is from 1300 century. The river in the photos is the River Aura, that floats in the middle of Turku. It normally freezes in the winter. I Just noticed I don’t have photos from Turku at the summer.”

Jarno 1

Jarno2

Jarno 3

Jarno 4

Jarno 5

Jarno 6

Jarno 7

Solid Effort From Habs

I don’t know whether the Canadiens simply played a fine home game and did most things right, or the Anaheim Ducks were flat and weren’t a shell of their normal selves.

Regardless, a great night for the Canadiens as they stayed mostly in control over 60 minutes and handed the visitors a fine-looking 4-1 win. A huge win. Just when we thought they were screwed.

On this night the Habs skated well, checked well, didn’t take an atrocious amount of stupid penalties, kept the Ducks chances to a minimum, didn’t blow the lead, and Cary Price did his job and looked confident and in control.

The funny thing is, those Ducks that we thought the Habs didn’t have much of a chance against, mainly because of the decimated lineup, have just two more points than the Montreal. Hilarious how the look can change with one big/little win.

Michael Bournival contributed a goal and an assist. Tomas Plekanec had a goal and two assists. Brian Gionta had two assists. And Rene Bourque picked things up a notch and although he didn’t score on a clear cut breakaway, he did soon after, just after coming out of the penalty box.

A real good night, and a nice thank you from the fans to Saku Koivu who was put on the ice by coach Bruce Boudreau in the last minute of play as a final hurrah, and then was given the game’s third star which of course had fans standing and cheering. A nice classy move by both Boudreau, the star selectors, and the fans.

That, and a Habs win, is the reason why hockey can be the best sport in the world. Unlike Tuesday when they blew a game to Edmonton, which made hockey the worst sport in the world.

Random Notes:

Shots on goal, Anaheim 32, Montreal 25.

With Tomas Plekanec’s three points, he now finds himself second in team points with nine, just two shy of PK.

Michael Bournival has really added some punch to the offense and now finds himself with five points and in the middle of the pack. A great situation for a kid who wasn’t sure until recently if he had a job with the big team or not.

Next game – Saturday when the Sharks come to town. Another tough test for our guys, and we now know that they can do it, injuries or not.

 

Bench Made By………..

With Saku Koivu and his Anaheim Ducks in town tonight, I thought now is as good a time as any to present the following.

You just might be surprised to know that the bench below, made from hockey sticks and which sits in the lobby of Classic Auctions, was made by none other than………..

Saku Koivu’s wife.

Seriously.

019

Habs And Leafs

Just like the old days. Habs and Leafs on a Wednesday night. I grew up with this type of thing. But back then, the Leafs were almost good.

Toronto’s in 7th place in the East with 24 points, which is ridiculous. It’s almost March and they’re sort of still in it. Must have something to do with the short season.

Starting tonight, the Leafs begin their annual spring collapse. It’s the way of the world.

Random Notes;

Michael Ryder’s number will be 73, which means Brendan Gallagher, because he’s a snot-nosed rookie, forfeits it and takes on number 11. Previous Habs number 11 guys include, of course, the legendary Scott Gomez, along with Saku Koivu, Kirk Muller, Ryan Walter, Yvon Lambert, Marc Tardif, Rejean Houle and so on, all the way down to Clayton Frechette during the 1912-13 season.

Approximately 73 Habs in all have owned number 11, which is more than any other.

Number 11’s a nice low number and I feel Gally’s lucky to have it. Same with Brandon Prust with number 8. Considering numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, and 12 are all hanging from the rafters.

 

 

2011 – The Year Of Gomez’s Promise And Other Fine Moments

Another year older and deeper in debt. Etc.

2011 had some fine moments for Habs fans, and unfortunately, some not-so-fine moments. So let’s have a glimpse at what happened in this Year of the Rabbit. And please keep in mind, things aren’t in order here. That would be way too normal.

Carey Price posed with his arms crossed after a win, which upset some and I don’t know why. I thought it was quite creative. Pittsburgh’s Marc-Andre Fleury mimicked Price a week later but alas, it all ended there.

Saku Koivu returned for the first time after being traded to Anaheim, and that was nice. Unfortunately, Saku’s new team won 4-3 in a shootout.

P.K. Subban was selected for the All-Rookie team at the All-Star game in Raleigh. PK’s smile made us smile, and when he put on Jeff Skinner’s jersey in the shootout competition he made us smile even more. At least I smiled. I don’t know about you.

I held half a dozen or so contests in 2011, with people far and wide winning some good shit.

James Wisniewski took a puck in the face in Edmonton, looked like we’d lose him for months, but he was back for the Heritage Classic in Calgary just a few days later. We would eventually lose Wiz anyways when Columbus gave him a zillion dollars. And speaking of the Heritage Classic, Carey Price put on his new facemask that was so weird that little kids were put to bed early so they wouldn’t see it and have nightmares.

Rearguard Brent Sopel played one year with the Habs, and when he was cut loose at the end and not picked up, ended up going to the KHL and is probably slurping borscht as we speak.

My grandson Adam entered the world on February 3rd and will almost certainly play for the Habs in twenty years.

Also in February, Luci and I went to Vancouver to see the Habs beat the Canucks in a terrific game where we had great seats and a wonderful time. And speaking of Vancouver, Gilbert Brule of the Edmonton Oilers was driving in his car with his girlfriend, near the ferry terminal at Horseshoe Bay, and stopped to pick up a hitchhiker who happened to be Bono from the band U2. I just find that as weird as can be.

Boston won the Cup, as you know, and thousands rioted in the Vancouver downtown area. Several dozen are just now on the verge of having their big court appearances and most say they feel bad. I feel bad too. Because the Bruins won the Cup.

We lost assistant coach Kirk Muller to Nashville affiliate Milwaukee Admirals, Boston Pizza changed their name to Montreal Pizza during the playoffs, Bruin Andrew Ference gave the finger to the Bell Centre crowd after scoring a goal, a tortoise named Gerry La Tortue tried to predict games in the Habs-Bruins series and often failed miserably, and Hal Gill signed a one year, 2.25 million dollar contract.

A woman in Vancouver flashed her boobs at San Jose’s Ben Eager while he sat in the penalty box, Winnipeg got an NHL team again – the ex-Atlanta Thrashers, and Luci and I went to Ontario where we hooked up with some great new and old friends and co-workers in both Ottawa and Orillia, enjoyed a luncheon with NHL oldtimers in Toronto, visited my dad in his new old folks home, stayed with my brother, and went to see the old arena in Orillia where the doors were locked.

2011 was the year of the big Zdeno Chara hit on Max Pacioretty, which fractured Max’s neck which in turn caused many Bruins fans to laugh and jump with glee. It also allowed Mark Recchi to use his medical knowledge to diagnose the situation and conclude it wasn’t as bad as we were led to believe.

Jean Beliveau turned 80 in 2011, Wayne Gretzky 50, Carey Price 24, and Don Cherry 119.

I had an interview in Puck Daddy and Bruins fans accused me of sounding like a Hab fan.

Andrei Kostitsyn slammed Jacques Martin for playing him improperly, Josh Gorges signed for one year, 2.5 million, Erik Cole also inked for 4 years, 18 million, and Roman Hamrlik went to Washington.

Assistant coach Perry Pearn was let go, and the two Randy’s – Cunneyworth and Ladouceur, joined Martin behind the bench.

Vancouver Giant sensation Brendan Gallagher had a great camp and almost made the Habs, Chris Campoli was added to the blueline corps, and Scott Gomez told us he was embarrassed by his previous season, was sorry, and things would be different this year.

Longtime Canadiens trainer and equipment guy Eddie Palchak passed away, Andrei Markov almost played on the Habs’ California trip but didn’t, Jacques Martin was out and Cunneyworth in, Rocket’s star was stolen from the sidewalk at the Forum, the bilingual coach issue has raised it’s ugly head, and I mistakingly ate some toxic maple syrup and lived to tell about it.

So there you have it. I know I’ve missed a lot, but enough’s enough.

And of course, I wish you all a very splendid New Year. May it be your best year ever.

 

 

 

The Clock Is Ticking

As I sit here at 9:15 a.m. drinking coffee and and eating a chocolate hash brownie (it doesn’t really have hash in it. I’m reading Keith Richard’s book and I’m swept away), I realize there are only 32 days and 10 hours before the Canadiens host Dallas in their first pre-season game.

Yes, 32 days is a lot and as I post every day, I hope you don’t mind when I put up stories about the old days and hockey treasures and all that jazz. I just feel that if some readers only go as far back as Saku Koivu or even Patrick, I can fill them in a little beyond that. During the season I’m modern like crazy. Like Keith Richards.

Regardless, I feel it’s important to point something out. As the new season progresses, being at the top of the heap, in first place, isn’t all it’s cut out to be. Our Habs should pace themselves, not burn out going for number one, and just keep all the ducks in a row for the post season.

Don’t forget, Washington was number one in the east and what did it get them? A second-round exit, swept by the 6th place Lightning, and Bruce Boudreau almost ended up applying for jobs teaching English at community colleges. Boston, eventual Cup winners, which makes me nauseous just thinking about, sat in third spot in the east. Montreal was sixth.

The Vancouver Canucks also provide an excellent example. First overall, most points of all 30 teams (117), and by the time they met the Bruins in the final, they were only a shell of themselves. They were so burnt out they couldn’t even mangle Brad Marchand’s nose, even just a little. All in all, 117 points got the Canucks a second-best handle, and as they say, second-best is for losers. Or something like that.

So 32 days, and now nine hours, before it begins, and 48 days before opening the regular season against Toronto. It’s still a lot of days.

In the meantime, I’ll just carry on with old and sometimes new, and maybe the odd Keith Richards/hash brownie remark. Please hang in. Like I said, at some point I attempt to get quite modern.

As you can see, I’m feeling a little guilty.

 

 

Habs Global Warming

Dennis Bacalhau is a big Habs fan in Sydney, Australia, and once again has sent a nice piece of artwork he’s created.

It was almost exactly a year ago, July 16, 2010, that Dennis introduced himself and included a sketch of Saku Koivu – Habs Fan Down Under. Now he’s back and not only has he sent his great artwork of Carey Price, but he also included a way to animate it which of course I’m not able to do here because I’m not smart enough.

Before the internet, imagine how hard it must have been for a fan in Australia to follow his team. Back then, it was a late-arriving copy of The Hockey News that those so far away had to rely on, or a USA Today newspaper at a hotel or airport. Now, through the wonders of science and technology, folks around the world can read or hear the drivel that comes out of Mike Milbury’s mouth as soon as he says it.

Gomez

If someone continued to dump on me about my work production, I’d be getting mightily riled. So why do I go on about Scott Gomez?

I’ve been very hard on Gomez lately because he’s, well….. not doing enough. On the ice at least. Maybe at home he’s a ball of fire, fixing the dryer and cutting the lawn and scrubbing the oven. I hear he has some nagging injuries now and I’m sympathetic indeed, but it doesn’t give him an out for the other parts of his season.

He just isn’t helping the Canadiens like he should, aside from his ability to carry the puck in sweeping motions from his end, deep into the other. Gomez does this well, and he’ll often find a teammate and get him the puck and at times, things happen from this. That’s what he does but it’s not enough. Not when the team needs more.

But I need to refocus. Scott Gomez might be an extremely nice person. I saw (on TV of course), Larry Robinson give him a warm hug before the New Jersey game a while back and any friend of Larry Robinson is a friend of mine.

I admit I admired his unusual bent-over skating style when he played for the South Surrey Eagles in the BCHL and came to Powell River. And there are times now when he’s reasonably effective. Not often but I’m just saying.

I don’t know why I expect more from him, aside from the large contract and the fact that he won the Calder trophy a decade ago with the Devils. And yes, the team gave up on Saku Koivu and added him. 

The reality is, except for the 2005-06 season in New Jersey when Gomez managed 33 goals, his career has shown that he’s not any kind of a scorer at all. Never has been. He’s now in his 12th year in the NHL and his goal totals have been 19, 14, 10, 13, 14, 13, 33, 13, 16, 16, 12, and now just 7. So even though he’s slightly off-pace for a normal Gomez year, he’s not far off.

Last season with the Habs he managed only 12.

This is not Guy Lafleur.

I guess all we can expect is that Gomez takes the puck from his end to the other, sometimes make a nice pass, and sometimes kill a penalty. If he really hasn’t been a goal scorer all along, why should we expect him to be one now? 

That’s not being too negative, is it?

Scott Gomez has seven goals in 63 games. These players below scored almost as many in just one game. (This also isn’t being too negative, is it?)

    
Name? Nationality? Team? Date? Goals?
Joe Malone  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01917-12-19 December 19, 1917 5
Harry Hyland  Canada Montreal Wanderers 01917-12-19 December 19, 1917 5
Joe Malone  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01918-01-12 January 12, 1918 5
Joe Malone  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01918-02-02 February 2, 1918 5
Newsy Lalonde[3]  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01919-03-01 March 1, 1919 5
Newsy Lalonde  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01920-01-10 January 10, 1920 6
Joe Malone  Canada Quebec Bulldogs 01920-01-31 January 31, 1920 7
Mickey Roach  United States Toronto St. Pats 01920-03-06 March 6, 1920 5
Joe Malone  Canada Quebec Bulldogs 01920-03-10 March 10, 1920 6
Corb Denneny  Canada Toronto St. Pats 01921-01-26 January 26, 1921 6
Newsy Lalonde  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01921-02-16 February 16, 1921 5
Cy Denneny  Canada Ottawa Senators 01921-03-07 March 7, 1921 6
Babe Dye  Canada Toronto St. Pats 01922-12-16 December 16, 1922 5
Red Green  Canada Hamilton Tigers 01924-12-05 December 5, 1924 5
Babe Dye  Canada Toronto St. Pats 01924-12-22 December 22, 1924 5
Punch Broadbent  Canada Montreal Maroons 01925-01-07 January 7, 1925 5
Pit Lepine  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01929-12-29 December 29, 1929 5
Howie Morenz  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01930-03-18 March 18, 1930 5
Charlie Conacher  Canada Toronto Maple Leafs 01932-01-19 January 19, 1932 5
Ray Getliffe  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01943-02-06 February 6, 1943 5
Syd Howe  Canada Detroit Red Wings 01944-02-03 February 3, 1944 6
Maurice Richard[5]  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01944-03-23 March 23, 1944 5
Maurice Richard  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01944-12-28 December 28, 1944 5
Howie Meeker  Canada Toronto Maple Leafs 01947-01-08 January 8, 1947 5
Bernie Geoffrion  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01955-02-19 February 19, 1955 5
Bobby Rousseau  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01964-02-01 February 1, 1964 5
Red Berenson  Canada St. Louis Blues 01968-11-07 November 7, 1968 6
Yvan Cournoyer  Canada Montreal Canadiens 01975-02-15 February 15, 1975 5
Darryl Sittler  Canada Toronto Maple Leafs 01976-02-07 February 7, 1976 6
Darryl Sittler[5]  Canada Toronto Maple Leafs 01976-04-22 April 22, 1976 5
Reggie Leach[5]  Canada Philadelphia Flyers 01976-05-06 May 6, 1976 5
Don Murdoch  Canada New York Rangers 01976-10-12 October 12, 1976 5
Ian Turnbull  Canada Toronto Maple Leafs 01977-02-02 February 2, 1977 5
Bryan Trottier  Canada New York Islanders 01978-12-23 December 23, 1978 5
Tim Young  Canada Minnesota North Stars 01979-01-15 January 15, 1979 5
John Tonelli  Canada New York Islanders 01981-01-06 January 6, 1981 5
Wayne Gretzky  Canada Edmonton Oilers 01981-02-18 February 18, 1981 5
Wayne Gretzky  Canada Edmonton Oilers 01981-12-30 December 30, 1981 5
Grant Mulvey  Canada Chicago Black Hawks 01982-02-03 February 3, 1982 5
Bryan Trottier  Canada New York Islanders 01982-02-12 February 12, 1982 5
Willy Lindstrom  Sweden Winnipeg Jets 01982-03-02 March 2, 1982 5
Mark Pavelich  United States New York Rangers 01983-02-23 February 23, 1983 5
Jari Kurri  Finland Edmonton Oilers 01983-11-19 November 19, 1983 5
Bengt-Ake Gustafsson  Sweden Washington Capitals 01984-01-08 January 8, 1984 5
Pat Hughes  Canada Edmonton Oilers 01984-02-03 February 3, 1984 5
Wayne Gretzky  Canada Edmonton Oilers 01984-12-15 December 15, 1984 5
Dave Andreychuk  Canada Buffalo Sabres 01986-02-06 February 6, 1986 5
Wayne Gretzky  Canada Edmonton Oilers 01987-12-06 December 6, 1987 5
Mario Lemieux  Canada Pittsburgh Penguins 01988-12-31 December 31, 1988 5
Joe Nieuwendyk  Canada Calgary Flames 01989-01-11 January 11, 1989 5
Mario Lemieux[5]  Canada Pittsburgh Penguins 01989-04-25 April 25, 1989 5
Mats Sundin  Sweden Quebec Nordiques 01992-03-05 March 5, 1992 5
Mario Lemieux  Canada Pittsburgh Penguins 01993-04-09 April 9, 1993 5
Peter Bondra  Slovakia Washington Capitals 01994-02-05 February 5, 1994 5
Mike Ricci  Canada Quebec Nordiques 01994-02-17 February 17, 1994 5
Alexei Zhamnov  Russia Winnipeg Jets 01995-04-01 April 1, 1995 5
Mario Lemieux  Canada Pittsburgh Penguins 01996-03-26 March 26, 1996 5
Sergei Fedorov  Russia Detroit Red Wings 01996-12-26 December 26, 1996 5
Marian Gaborik[6]  Slovakia Minnesota Wild 02007-12-20 December 20, 2007 5
Johan Franzen[7]  Sweden Detroit Red Wings 02011-02-02 February 2, 2011 5