Tag Archives: Larry Robinson

A Blown Opportunity, And A Big Night Coming Up

It could’ve been a beautiful thing, a Hollywood sequel, where the good guy in the white hat wins, grabs the girl, and rides off in to the sunset.

But it wasn’t to be. Montreal battled back against Pittsburgh, down 3-1 to grab the lead 4-3. But late in the game, the bad guys, the men with black hats, the Pittsburgh Penguins, scored twice quickly and got two big points.

So I’ve got nothing to say about this, except that Pittsburgh star Evgeny Malkin had a goal and two assists, and Montreal’s Michael Ryder scored again to make it four goals in three games, and is now either a little safer in his job with the Habs, or is much better trade bait for the team if they want to try and get someone like Alex Tanguay.

So enough about this blown opportunity. It’s time now to focus on Saturday night when Columbus comes to town. Montreal must win this game or they’re only another loss or two away from another slump, which can’t happen at this stage of the game.

And also on this same night, prior to the game, Montreal GM Bob Gainey gets his old number 23 retired to the rafters.

Gainey will join a nice long list of players to receive such an honour in Montreal. And because I want to take my mind off the loss tonight, instead I’m going to focus on giving you a list of the Habs stars who have their numbers retired.

They are:morenz.jpg

1. Jacques Plante

2. Doug Harvey

4. Jean Beliveau

5. Bernie Geoffrion

7. Howie Morenz

9. Maurice Richard

10. Guy Lafleur

12. Dickie Moore and Yvon Cournoyer

16. Henri Richard

18. Serge Savard

19. Larry Robinson

29. Ken Dryden

And this Saturday Night. No 23. Bob Gaineygainey.jpg

The Germ Of Philadelphia Flyers Goonship. PLUS – Habs Sweep! (And Catch Ottawa!)

bobby-clarke.jpg

The photo above is of course long-time Philadelphia Flyer Bobby Clarke. He was the leader of the Broad Street Bullies in the early part of the 1970’s when they had such goons as Dave Schultz, Bob Kelly, Don Saleski, and Moose Dupont. Clarke was their leader, but any one of them could have beat the shit out of him.

The Flyers of the 1970’s might have gooned other teams, but when it came time for the Montreal Canadiens, these same Flyers behaved like a bunch of mice. Not only could the Habs play better hockey, but the big boys like Larry Robinson, Pierre Bouchard, and Rick Chartraw sent them home to their mommies, and Montreal won the 1975-76 Stanley Cup, their first of four straight.

Not only that, because Russian star Valeri Kharlamov was so vastly superior in 1972, Bobby Clarke broke the guy’s ankle with his stick during the Summit Series.

The 2007-2008 edition of the Flyers is a little bit the same as the thugs of the 70’s, with several suspensions for thinly-veiled attempted murders, but just not quite as good. Regardless, Montreal takes care of business. (Like a 5-3 win tonight in Philly, and catching Ottawa in the process.)

Phil Esposito Must Be Rolling Over In His Brylcreem

Since the late 1960’s, the Boston Bruins have liked nothing better than beating the Montreal Canadiens. They’ve liked it better than pretty well everything – sex, chocolate, maybe even their wives.

But now, with the glorious 8-2 demolition by the Habs last night, those Boston Balloons, er, Bruins, have lost nine times in a row to the good guys. What would Espo, Orr, Cashman, Middleton, O’Reilly, and Bucyk think?

On the other hand, The Canadiens were simply champions last night. The Kostitsyn brothers are going to make the Sedin twins in Vancouver look like a couple of Swedish meatballs. These two young Russians have been just an excellent and a somewhat surprising find for the team, adding speed and creativity to the attack. On top of that, Alex Kovalev looked like Valeri Kharlamov, and Mike Komisarek was Larry Robinson in disguise.

The entire Montreal squad was impressive. Geez this must burn Boston fans’ asses.

On a very serious and sombre note, I would like to thank the fans at the Bell Centre for waiting to sing the ‘olay’ song until after the team had about a five goal lead. Way to go, fans.

Next up, Thursday against the New Jersey Devils. More about that tomorrow. Right now I’m just trying to savour the big thumping.

Mike Komisarek Is On The Hit Parade, But The Song Isn’t

I thought it was Larry Robinson out there. But it wasn’t. It was Mike Komisarek, taking care of those nasty Boston Bruins in a way you’re supposed to, by crashing and crunching and slamming and blocking. If Komisarek continues like this, he’s going to be one of the scariest in the league to play against.

Komisarek coming into his own is good news for the Habs and Habs fans. He’s not quite 26 years old, is 6’4″, and weighs 241. The perfect guy to slam opponents’ faces into the glass, bend ribs, crush heads, and scare the bejeesus out of lesser men. With him around, Koivu, Kovalev, Higgins, and the rest feel slightly more at ease.

Montreal pounded Boston 5-2 and it was a beautiful sight. I have only one complaint, and you might have heard this before from me but I’m not letting up until this foolishness ceases. Montreal was leading comfortably 3-0 in the second period and it started. That wretched song again, being sung by Habs fans IN BOSTON. You’ve heard it before, this obnoxious, incessant, vomit-inducing Olay, Olay, Olay, Olay song they sing when the team’s winning. But 9 times out of ten, the other team comes back and scores, and often wins, because the song is sung too early and it’s a big jinx as far as I’m concerned. Last night, just after it started, Boston, naturally, scored. Then, naturally, they scored again. MONTREAL ALMOST LOST BECAUSE OF THIS SONG THAT I DISLIKE MORE THAN SEAN AVERY. And probably Steve Downey. 

Please people, quit singing this song. It’s smacks of smugness, arrogance, and over-confidence. If you have to sing it, please wait until the final minute when the team is winning by 3 or 4 goals. Thanks.

Next up, the Rangers on Saturday night. Time to pull away even further. Sean Avery is hurt but he might be faking so he doesn’t have to play against Mike Komisarek.