Tag Archives: Ken Dryden

Turk Says Dryden’s Overrated

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In Derek Sanderson’s 2012 book “Crossing The Line” that I got at the St. Hubert Library, he says Ken Dryden was overrated, which we’ve all heard from time to time. At least I have.

Sanderson talked about how the Bruins were the better team against Montreal in 1971, but they shot themselves in the foot. Boston didn’t take the Canadiens seriously. He didn’t really talk about Dryden’s accomplishments, he only mentioned that the young goalie had arrived on the scene, had only six games under his belt before the playoffs began, and proceeded to somehow get his body in the way.

He sort of mentioned that the Habs eliminated Boston, but he didn’t go near the Habs winning the Cup after beating Chicago in the finals, and Dryden being awarded the Conn Smythe Trophy. We wouldn’t expect him to. The book’s not about the Habs.

When you put it all together though, it’s a magical piece of hockey lore. Maybe not so much for Bruins fans I guess. They probably hate the story.

Turk Sanderson says this: “Dryden was highly overrated, in my opinion, but he was the first big goaltender. He covered the top of the net so well, and when he dropped and spread, he covered a lot of ground in the bottom part. You’d turn to shoot, and he would have that area covered because of his size. It took us a while to get used to that. It created problems we had never seen before.”

Sanderson goes on to say, “Dryden didn’t provide the stellar goaltending everybody continues to talk about. You could score on Dryden. He wasn’t that good; he was just different.”

Sanderson is saying that Dryden wasn’t a good goalie, he was just a big goalie. But Sanderson was a Bruin for many of the years when they played against each, and he might still have Habs/Bruins issues.

Dryden was in goal for game 8 when it was for all the marbles so Harry Sinden must not have thought he was overrated. And Sinden coached Sanderson. Dryden also collected 6 Stanley Cups during those days, but maybe a much lesser goalie might have too considering the team up front with Lafleur, Robinson, Lemaire et al.

Like I said, I’ve heard various people say over the years that Dryden was overrated but I tend to not think much about it. I just wonder if there are many other players who played against him, like Sanderson did, who also feel he was overrated. And if lots do, does that mean he was?

As an aside, Sanderson also says Cam Neely was the greatest right winger to ever play the game.

 

Dryden’s always had a bit of a reputation for not being overly-enthusiastic about signing autographs, and here’s a great exampleWindsor Star.

Guy And Tim

Busy day coming up, maybe, so now’s as good a time as any to simply throw in a caricature of Guy Lafleur that I took a picture of in Old Montreal. The guy doing the drawing and selling didn’t seem all that thrilled that I took a picture instead of buying it and I don’t blame him.

It’s not a masterpiece, but I like it anyway. The Flower might not but I do. At least I think I do.

Maybe I don’t.

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I read earlier that Tim Thomas has asked his agent to see if any teams might be interested in him. Thomas took last year off, just a couple of years after telling the hockey world at the NHL Awards how unbelievable it was that he’d spent so many years in the minors and had finally made it to the bigs and how fantastic it was.

The novelty wore off somewhere along the line, he refused to go to the White House with his teammates to meet Barack Obama after the Bruins’ Cup win in 2011, but now I guess he’s got it out of his system and wants to come back. But I guess I can’t say much. Ken Dryden got away from the game for awhile too.

But who cares about Tim Thomas. I’m going with the Guy Lafleur picture.

Lafleur

A Beautiful Area And An Old Habs Draft Pick

We’re sitting in our friends’ amazing house built on fifty acres of bushland near Peterborough, and after working our way through the Toronto area, this is about as serene as it gets.

I read a few years ago that Hwy 401 from Oakville to Whitby is the busiest stretch of highway in North America and I believe it. And this from someone who was stuck in traffic on L.A. freeways.

Central Ontario gets a bad rap from those who’ve never been or once rushed through. It can be stunningly beautiful. Turning off the main highway and making our way along country roads was a sensational experience. I’d almost forgotten how nice central Ontario is after spending so many years near mountains and beside the ocean.

Although I’ve never been to Ireland, I think it probably looks like this. Nice rolling hills, full of green fields and old barns. A few leprechauns now and again.

Maybe I don’t have to go to Ireland now. I’ll just visit the Peterborough area from time to time and bring some Guinness.

I think every part of Canada has its own big-time beauty, and around here is definitely no exception.

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My friend Mike Mohun, who grew up in Orillia the same time as me, sent me a great article from the Orillia Packet and Times about John French, a guy I played hockey and baseball with when I was a kid, and someone I’ve mentioned several times here.

I often played on the same line as John, he was way better than me and everybody else, and he was our catcher when our peewee baseball team rolled over all challengers.

John was drafted by the Montreal Canadiens and in training camp played on the same line as Jean Beliveau and Yvan Cournoyer. He also roomed with Ken Dryden.

A really interesting piece, and can be seen here – Little Guy Made It To The Bigs

I just don’t remember him as being little.

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Luci doesn’t know it yet but in awhile, she’s going for her first Harley ride. I can’t wait to see this. My Luci, on the back of a Harley, roaring down the road. Biker chick.

 

Lineups Announced

The rosters for Saturday’s Habs-Leafs tilt have been announced, and as you can see, Leafs coach Randy Carlyle is suiting up. It can’t hurt.

What a team the Habs had, eh?

This is from the 1977-78 season, a season that saw the Canadiens finish with 129 points, take home the Prince of Wales for finishing first, and end with their third straight Stanley Cup.

The Vezina went to Ken Dryden and Michel Larocque; the Hart, the Art Ross, and the Lester B. Pearson trophies were collected by Guy Lafleur; the Conn Smythe was awarded to Larry Robinson; and Bob Gainey won the Selke.

Peter Mahovlich would be sent to Pittsburgh after 17 games, in exchange for Pierre Larouche.

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Jim Ralph Found Another Way

I remember Jim Ralph when he was a goalie for the Ottawa 67′s in the 1970′s. He was never a great backstopper, and his career didn’t amount to much, just bouncing around the minors for a decade after junior, and he never made it to the bigs.

But there’s one thing about Jim Ralph – he’s a funny guy, which has led to many, many television gigs and speaking engagements around North America. Ralph settled in nicely, doing what he does best, after his playing days were finished.

Here’s a sampling, with Ken Dryden, Wayne Gretzky, Gary Bettman and others chuckling away and having a grand old time listening to him.

Dick And Danny Do The Game

It’s the magical combination of Danny Gallivan and Dick Irvin as the Habs and Flyers battle on May 16, 1976. Montreal would win 5-3 on this night, sweeping the Flyers to win their 19th Stanley Cup.

Period one (30 min.) and period three (42 min) are included here, and we see the Cup awarded. Just wonderful, and thanks to my old buddy Rugger for sending it along.

Period One:

Period Three:

Dryden Quirks

Dryden

Goalies apparently are a different breed. We’ve heard that forever. So why would Ken Dryden be any different?

In Gerry Patterson’s 1978 book “Behind The Superstars,” (which I talked about a few posts back – Anne and Gordie ), Patterson writes about Dryden’s legendary unwillingness to open his wallet. (And to sign autographs).

After five hours of new contract negotiations with Sam Pollock, Patterson finally got Dryden what he was asking for. Dryden then asked to speak to Patterson privately, saying he’d decided he wanted another $10,000.

After Patterson had managed to get him his raise, plus the extra $10,000, Dryden invited Patterson to lunch and bought him a cheeseburger and coke.

Whenever Dryden phoned Patterson, whether it was from Toronto, Los Angeles, or Vienna, he always phoned collect.

One year it was decided that Dryden needed a new winter coat, so he searched second-hand stores in Montreal for a good deal.

Every time Dryden visited Patterson at his office in downtown Montreal, he always seemed anxious to leave. Patterson later learned that the goalie would always park in a no parking area to save paying for parking, and he was worried he’d get a ticket.

Dryden and his wife lived in a nice high-rise, but the apartment was furnished with card tables and folding chairs, “in case I’m traded or we have to move for some reason. It’s really very practical.”

Dryden has always hated signing autographs. “People believe that an athlete should be compelled to sign autographs. Well, I am not compelled to sign. Autographs are a complete waste of time for both parties.”

 

 

 

The Art Of Brandy Saturley

Below, examples of the wonderful work of Canadian artist Brandy Saturley.

Canuck Days

Desaturated Cherry

Goalie’s Mask: Red, White, and Dryden. This piece is displayed, along side one of Ken Dryden’s masks, in Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame, with prints available at Goalie’s Mask. Proceeds go to The Hall.

Death of a Rookie (Rise of a Hero)

Saint Kanata

Keep On Dreamin’ In The Free World

Poppies For Louise

Plante Rises

Ken Helps Out

It was this running schtick I had going with my sister for awhile. One of us would say something like, “I’ve known a lot of people in my life…… and you’re one of them.” Or if we were in the car one would say, “You know, I’ve seen a lot of drivers in my life…… and you’re one of them.” Silly stuff like that.

Maybe you had to be there. Seemed funny at the time.

Ken Dryden showed up at a bookstore in Calgary and my sister got him to write this:

More From Kouli

Kouli in Vancouver always has such great photos for sale on his site at Kouli the Greek and I very much appreciate him letting me show some of his stuff, which I do from time to time.

Below, Mr. Beliveau; the 1912 edition of the Habs; Charlie Hodge; Pete and Frank Mahovlich with Pocket Rocket; a scene from the 1970′s movie Million Dollar Hockey Puck; Rocket; Toe Blake; a great ad; Ken Dryden; and a very young Rocket. Hope you enjoy.