Tag Archives: Joe Louis Arena

One More For Tampa And Detroit

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The Canadiens must now wait for the Lightning and Red Wings to battle it out in game seven after Tampa held on for a 5-2 win in game six.

I’m not sure whom I want Montreal to face. Both teams look decent. Originally I would’ve said Red Wings after the Canadiens skunked them four games to none during the season while the Habs lost all five to Tampa. But either way is fine. Bring ’em on.

Detroit was Henri Richard and Claude Provost’s favourite place to play, although at that time it was at the Olympia, which opened in 1927 with the Detroit Cougars (and then Falcons), and closed in 1979 when the Red Wings, who played under that name from 1932 on, took over the brand new Joe Louis Arena.

When I was playing bantam or midget hockey in Orillia, our coach told us we had the choice of playing in a tournament somewhere in Ontario, or in an exhibition game at the Olympia in Detroit.

We had a vote, and the majority of the guys voted to play in the tournament. I was pissed then and I’m still now. I never understood my teammates about this. We were in lots of tournaments, but the chance to play at the Olympia was a once in a lifetime thing.

I’ll bet the guys don’t even remember the tournament. I don’t. But we’d all remember the Olympia.

A Short Tale Of Two Arenas

Game four of the Stanley Cup finals is played, of course, at Pittsburgh’s Mellon Arena. This place, once known as the Civic Arena and nicknamed the Igloo, is the oldest in the league, having opened its’ doors in 1961. It holds about 17,000 people, is old, it leaks in places, and some people can’t see because an overhead structure obstructs their view. So televisions have been placed so they can watch the game they’re at on the screen.

The Civic Arena became the home of the Penguins when the team entered the league in the 1967 expansion.  The name was changed to Mellon in 1999, and was, like several other arenas around the league, named for a bank. 

When game five goes in Detroit, it will be, as always, played at the Joe Louis Arena, named after Detroit native and world champion boxer Joe Louis. It’s nice that this arena isn’t named after a bank or some other conglomerate.

The Joe has been around since 1979, and before that, the Wings played at the old Olympia, home of Gordie Howe, Alex Delvecchio, Terry Sawchuk, and several hundred dead octopi.

It holds just over 20,000. 

Pittsburgh and Detroit Go For The Cup. This Is Good, I Suppose.

Two real good teams are going to tangle for the Stanley Cup. I’ve got no complaints about this. It’s not like it’s the Florida Panthers, Carolina Hurricane, or Tampa Bay Lightening. Or even, dare I say, the Anaheim Ducks.

No, the Pittsburgh Penguins and Detroit Red Wings are a solid matchup and two good hockey towns to boot. Pittsburgh had an NHL team in 1925, the Pirates, which lasted until 1930, and the city’s had the Penguins since league expansion in 1967.

Detroit’s been in the league since 1926 when they took over the Victoria BC franchise. The city and team like to call itself Hockeytown, which is a little off. If Detroit’s Hockeytown, then Montreal and Toronto must be Hockeycities.

And if the Joe Louis Arena in Detroit doesn’t start getting more fans in the seats, the nickname might have to be changed to ‘Used to Be Hockeytown.’

This leads me to my second complaint. It’s fine that Gordie Howe is called Mr. Hockey, but isn’t that for others to label the man? My personal opinion is, he shouldn’t be signing autographs as “Gordie Howe, Mr. Hockey.” Doesn’t that make him just a little bit full of himself?

Gordie Howe is considered by not all, but many, as the greatest ever. Greater than Gretzky, Orr, Richard, and Lemieux. It’s a judgement call. Hall of Fame goalie Glenn Hall told me Howe was the best there was.

He doesn’t need to blow his own horn. Let others do that for him. Let others call him Mr. Hockey.

And I say this with the utmost respect for Mr. Howe.

Am I wrong for thinking this? I’m pretty sure Mario never signed as Mario “The Magnificent One” Lemieux, or Orr as Bobby “The World’s Greatest Defenceman” Orr, or Maurice “Hero of a Province” Richard.

This year’s final is a sexy affair because of so many stars involved. Crosby, Malkin, Hossa, Staal, Malone, Zetterberg, Datsyuk, Franzen, Lidstrom, Draper. And the guy who played on the original 1926 Wings, Chris Chelios.

It’ll be good. I may even watch some of it.

The thing begins Saturday in Detroit.