Tag Archives: Jean Beliveau

Old And New Quebec Barns

We’re back from Quebec City where we had such a fine and outstanding time. A trip we’ll remember with great fondness.

Although when we were leaving Quebec it was minus-1 with snow and two hours south in Montreal it was plus-12 and sunny.

Below, the Colisee, scene of many a Jean Beliveau triumph with the Aces and Guy Lafleur with the Remparts, and the annual International Peewee Tournament held each February where 11 and 12-year olds sometimes play in front of more than 10,000 fans.

And of course the intense and often vicious Habs-Nordiques rivalry that existed from 1979 to ’95.

The unfinished building next door is the New Colisee, or Quebecor Arena, or whatever it’s going to be called, being built for a possible NHL team coming back in the near future. This place will hold 18,482 while the Colisee seats 15,176.

Coliseeue

Ace Of Diamonds

Aces

We’ve always heard that Jean Beliveau took his time leaving the Quebec Aces to play for the Habs because he had it made in Quebec.

In Quebec he was making as much or more than most NHL players, was given new cars to drive, and he was in no hurry to leave. Jean Beliveau was indeed was the toast of the provincial capital.

But wait – another story from Brian McFarlane’s book “True Hockey Stories: The Habs”.

In the early-’50s a Quebec provincial cabinet minister told the Canadiens that if they took Beliveau out of Quebec City before the Colisee had been paid for, the Montreal Forum would be condemned because it didn’t meet fire-regulation standards.

So Beliveau stayed in Quebec longer than normal because the big crowds he was drawing helped pay off the new arena.

 

 

Darth Does A Devil

Darth has sent over a legendary Devil to join his super cool and ever-growing library.

This one is of a guy Darth says should’ve been a Hab. A Montreal boy whose dad was the Canadiens official photographer for many years.

Definitely, Martin Brodeur would have been a sensational fit for the Canadiens. He’s been playing since 1993 and so for the first three years he’d have to be elsewhere until Patrick Roy left in ’96, and then in a perfect world, the team would have had the future Hall of Famer all those years until young Carey Price  grew up and arrived on the scene.

Here’s Darth’s Martin Brodeur, along with his other Dartharians.

MartinBrodeur

Darth

Old Habs fan

LARSELLER

goalcelebrationpainting1

TheGallys

PK Subban 2

CareyPrice2

DD

waynesimmonds

AlexGalchenyuk

Roadrunner In Action

Photo from my scrapbook of a peach-fuzzed rookie Yvan Cournoyer during the 1964-65 campaign, with Dickie Moore (as a Leaf), Jean Beliveau, Jean Guy Talbot, Bob Pulford, Ted Harris, Ron Stewart, and Charlie Hodge.

And below, although I never scrambled for a foul ball or flying puck, I did manage (very quietly) to get a Cournoyer goal puck through a trade, a goal he scored on Oct. 26, 1972, only a month after the ’72 Summit Series in which Roadrunner played a major role.

Yvan would retire at 35 after 15 seasons, all with the Habs, and 10 Stanley Cups.

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Yvan

“Cournoyer has it on that wing. Here’s a shot! Henderson makes a wild stab at it and falls. Here’s another shot. Right in front. They score! Henderson has scored for Canada!”

Roadrunner '72

And then there was that time he played on a line with Gaston.

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Friday’s Washington Game

Couldn’t see all of the Friday night Habs-Washington tilt, I’m in Ottawa at a family reunion,, and all I know from glancing back and forth from time to time was that Alex Galchenyuk looked good playing on the right side with Morenz at centre and Joliat on left wing.

I also thought the pairing of P.K. Subban and Doug Harvey on the blueline was a good fit, especially on the power play when Harvey outsmarted three Capitals, sent it over, and PK blasted one home.

Max Pacioretty, playing on a line with Jean Beliveau and Maurice Richard, dinged more than one biscuit off the post and apparently enjoyed a fine night all round. Playing with Le Gros Bill and Rocket seems to really agree with Patches, and I hope Toe Therrien keeps them together.

I also hope Toe sticks with the Lach, Bournival, and Lafleur line as well. I see good chemistry there. And anytime now I’m expecting the Steve Shutt, Lars Eller, and Brendan Gallagher triumvirate to finally break out of the doldrums.

The problem is, neither Peter Budaj in the first two periods and Jacques Plante, who replaced Budaj in the third, could handle Alex Ovechkin, who had the two netminders’ numbers in a big way. And it certainly didn’t help when John Ferguson was sent to the box for goalie mugging and shortly after, Brandon Prust for tripping, and it was left to Claude Provost and Tomas Plekanec to kill unnecessary and ill-timed penalties.

Although I must admit, I enjoyed seeing Sprague Cleghorn coldcock the obnoxious Mikhail Grabovski, even though it put us behind the eight-ball once again.

The team really has to get it together. Bobby Orr and the big, bad Bruins are well ahead in first place, and Tampa Bay continues to play well. And if Phil Kessel and Dave Keon continue their torrid goal scoring pace, Toronto’s going to be tough.

Habs get it done/not done in Washington Friday night. And they’ll have their hands full when the Penguins come to town on Saturday.

It’ll be nice when Cournoyer finally gets back.

Another Sanderson Moment

Recently I talked about reading Derek Sanderson’s recent book Crossing the Line and how he went on about Ken Dryden being overrated.

I forgot to mention something else.

Sanderson wrote that when he was a kid the Montreal Canadiens walked by him at a rink and when he approached Jean Beliveau for an autograph, Jean told him he was sorry but he had to hurry to catch the bus.

Sanderson said he never forgot that and the first time he played against the Habs as a rookie, he skated over to Beliveau the first chance he got and punched him in the mouth.

He then said he had to get the hell out of there because John Ferguson saw exactly what had happened.

I don’t know what to say. Why Sanderson would want to include that in his book is hard to say. Surely he had other things to write about instead of bragging about popping Le Gros Bill, who certainly has several more layers of class than Turk Sanderson.

Geez I wish Fergy would have………..

Jean 1

Jean 2

 

 

Face-Off

I went to see Face-Off in downtown Toronto when it was brand new in the theatres. It was sort of interesting. Some great players had cameos in this Canadian story of a folk singer and a hockey player having problems because of the difference in lifestyles, but without the decent hockey footage, I think the story would suck.

Rick Ley, a kid from the neighborhood in Orillia playing for the Toronto Maple Leafs at the time, was in it and I even think he had a one-line speaking role.

In the U.S. the movie is called “Winter Comes Early”. I don’t know why. Maybe the studio was worried that too many people, particularly in the warmer areas, wouldn’t have a clue what the title meant.

I like the last paragraph in the clipping below about Jacques Plante.

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The Original Six In Splendid Quality

I’m out of town for the day and thought I’d just re-post this because it’s so freakin’ unbelievable. Enjoy the Original Six, with Beliveau and the gang, in splendid quality.

I don’t know how often this has ever been in circulation, but it’s one of most greatest ten minutes of hockey clips you’ll ever see.

It’s from 1967, the quality is sensational, like it was filmed today, and we see Jean Beliveau, as smooth as smooth can be, Bobby Hull, Gordie Howe, Jacques Laperriere, Terry Harper, Ralph Backstrom, Terry Sawchuk, and just about everybody else from that time, all from the old Montreal Forum with the pillars in the background.

It’s called Blades and Brass, is set to music of a Mexican brass band, and comes from the National Film Board of Canada. So just sit back and enjoy the Original Six at the old Montreal Forum, in perfect quality.