Tag Archives: Grey Cup

Happy Grey Cup Day

The 101st Grey Cup goes today in chilly Regina, with the hometown Roughriders going helmet to helmet with the Eastern Champion Hamilton Ti-Cats.

It may be cold in Regina but it’s not exactly sunbathing time in Montreal either. It’s freaking freezing. A cold wind a ‘blowin.

Winter’s beginning. The real hockey starts.

How did I get away from the Grey Cup like that?

Go Saskatchewan.

Hoping for a high scoring affair with a last second field goal to win it.

I was at a Grey Cup game at Lansdowne Park in Ottawa in the 1980s. We sat in temporary end zone seats way too far from the action. I felt like I was sitting in west-end Ottawa and the game was in the east end.

There should be a law against bad seats at any sporting event or concert. In a perfect world, everyone would see the action just like being in front of a TV, only live.

Why don’t they make male store mannequins with beer guts? The mannequin looks like a million bucks in the store window, even without a face. But when I put on the same shirt, it’s pretty bad and it’s giving me an inferiority complex.

How’d I get away from the Grey Cup again?

Go Hamilton!

 

Argos Cancel Stamps

The big game, the 100th Grey Cup, is now in the books as the Toronto Argonauts outshone the Calgary Stampeders 35-22, and it wasn’t nearly as close as the scoreboard showed. Calgary’s offence, with Kevin Glenn at the helm, couldn’t put together any kind of attack, passes fell short, there was no pressure and too many turnovers. They reminded me completely of the Habs power play.

Half time was almost interesting, with good old Orillia boy Gordon Lightfoot warbling his Canadian Railroad Trilogy, followed soon after by Justin Bieber doing whatever it is he does. Gordon looks old, his voice is weaker now but it’s still there, and he needs a haircut. Justin of course is a couple years younger than Gordon, his voice is downright mediocre, and he doesn’t need a haircut.

Maybe I’m wrong but I feel Mr. Bieber won’t be having a brilliant 50-year career like Gordon has. If I am wrong, you can remind me in 50 years and I’ll apologize and buy you a beer.

An unfortunate offshoot to the game? Thanks to it, the hole in the ozone is going to get bigger once again. You think cows give off emissions? You blame the cows for affecting the ozone? They’re not the only culprits. There’s also the Grey Cup partiers who ate chili and drank beer and are now polluting the atmosphere with hideous gases. Chili and beer, lots of it, consumed by way too many football fans, turning the air into a horrific, smelly, ozone hole-creating mess. And sometimes they light lighters under their bums to show they don’t care.

Of course cows are a problem too. It’s disgusting how they spend their days. Maybe if we could get a billion people or so to eat nothing but cheeseburgers and meatloaf for a decade or two, the cattle population would decrease and the hole in the ozone would have time to heal.

Next year, the Grey Cup is in Regina, where the world’s greatest football fans live. Crazy, loveable, hard workin’, hard livin’ prairie football fans.

The ozone’s in big trouble next year.

Big Canadian Day, Eh!

For those of you in other countries, today, Sunday, is a big day in Canada. Grey Cup Day. The 100th Grey Cup. When Canadians from coast to coast gather to eat meatballs, dips and chili. They also drink a lot of beer on this day, which is never a good idea because most have to work the next day, and if they haven’t learned in 100 years, they probably never will. But Canadians are Canadians. Just a wild and crazy bunch.

This Grey Cup will feature the Toronto Argonauts hosting the Calgary Stampeders, and I don’t really have a favourite. Maybe the team with the best-looking cheerleaders. Maybe I’ll root for the Argos because Torontonians have the Leafs and I feel sorry for them.

This was a trophy donated by Earl Grey in 1909. He originally had wanted to give away silverware that represented the best amateur hockey team in the country, but that rascal Sir Montagu Allan beat him to it, so Earl had to make it football because all the good hockey trophies had already been taken. I’ll bet he was pissed when he found out Monty got there first.

Habs great Doug Harvey was a huge fan, and once played against the Argos as a member of the Quebec Rugby Football Union, which in the 1940s was part of the CFL. He said that if he had to choose between hockey and football, he’d choose football. The Canadiens would often find themselves playing in Toronto on Grey Cup night, and coach Dick Irvin warned the guys not to go to the big game in the afternoon because he didn’t want any of them getting colds and sore throats and all that. The fine was $500, and every year Doug would go to the game and then pay the fine.

Cure for the hangover? Okay.

This is a sure thing, and it’s taken most of my life to figure it out. Put your coat on and walk about nine kilometers (5.5 miles), or more. I don’t know why this works. Maybe it’s something about getting the blood flowing. Or crisp air getting into your lungs. But it’s the best hangover cure I’ve ever tried, and I’ve tried a lot.

Random Note:

If your math doesn’t add up, that this is the 100th Grey Cup even though the trophy was donated in 1909, it’s because the game wasn’t played during the First World War years. At least I think that’s how it works.

 

 

 

 

This Is Why Newspapers Should Never Become Extinct

The things you find in a January 6, 1940 Toronto Daily Star.

There’s an ad for a game at 8.30 between the Montreal Canadiens and Toronto Maple Leafs at Maple Leaf Gardens, with good tickets available at 75 cents, $1.50, $2.00, and $2.50.

There’s a nice photo of star left winger for the Canadiens, Toe Blake, and in the accompaning article, it says, “Last time Canadiens and Leafs met in Montreal it was a delirious donnybrook. If the boys resume where they left off it will be a show no fight fan can afford to miss.”

And last but not least – ‘The Letter Box’, which features some interesting letters, including this from Harry Donnelly in Toronto.

“If you would make a survey of hockey fans here in Toronto or anywhere else in the NHL you will find it 12 to one in favour of a more open game, meaning bigger score and less whistle blowing. After all, it’s the fans who keep the NHL in existence and it seems it is high time they were taken into consideration. Even if it is only to the extent of finding out if they want less whistle blowing and a more open game with more scoring. After all you must remember the sports writer’s opinions and the fan who pays are often of opposite views.
   “I don’t say go back to the old seven man hockey but before the blue line was brought into effect there was some wonderful hockey played. Not all whistle blowing. Did you ever hear of a fan leaving a game that finished in a scoreless tie that felt he got his money’s worth?
Yours for whatever it’s worth.
Harry Donnelly

And then there’s this, from R.O.L.

“Well, here we are at the end of another sports year. Living as I do in “Hogtown” I glance back through the months to count the renowned trophies that are now being displayed in Hogtown. But I seem to have lost track of some of them, “or sumpin”!
“Can you help me out? Where is the Mann Cup, the Minto Cup, the Grey Cup, the Stanley Cup, the Allan Cup, the Memorial Cup, the Connaught cup, the Little League World Series trophy.
“Where, oh, where can they be?”

Cheering For The East In The West

I’m going to the annual Grey Cup party which is held at different people’s houses every year, where I’ll have a couple of beer and lose my usual 30 bucks because for some reason, God doesn’t think I should have money.

Anyway, because this is the west coast, everyone at the annual party always hopes for the west. And I go along with this mostly because they’re all pretty proud of their west coast and I admire that and respect it. And I love it here too, even though my own roots are eastern roots.

But I can’t bring myself to cheer against the Als. Even though Saskatchewan fans make me smile, like the guy who blows fire out of the top of his head.


Some Things Never Change. Letters To The Editor Sixty-Eight Years Ago.

 

Some things never change, I suppose. Especially when it comes to hockey and the Toronto Maple Leafs.

 

And now that I’m on a bit of a roll with neat old ads and stuff from old newspapers, I think you’ll find this very interesting. Because even though these Letters to the Editor of the Toronto Star date back to 1940, they very well could be today.

 

Hope you enjoy.

 

1940

 

To the Sports Editor:

“Well, here we are at the end of another sports year. Living as I do in Hogtown (Toronto), I glance back through the months to count the renowned trophies that are now being displayed in Hogtown. But I seem to have lost track of some of them.

 

Can you help me out? Where is the Grey Cup, the Stanley Cup, the Allan Cup, and the Memorial Cup?

Where, oh where, can they be?”

 

“PS. – By the way, may I take this opportunity of lodging a protest over the foolish and most confusing custom of referring to hockey seasons in terms of two years, such as 1934-35, 1935-36, 1936-37 etc.

The hockey leagues have already opened their 1940 seasons. True, they beat the gun, but what difference? The 1939 championships were won last spring – in 1939. Why anyone wants to confuse us by tacking 1939 onto the front of the 1940 season is more than I can see.”

 

LETTER NUMBER TWO

 

SPORTS EDITOR;

 

“Being a constant reader of The Star I would like to express my objection to the remarks of President John Kilpatrick in Lester Patrick’s plan to cut down whistle blowing.

I have attended hockey and baseball games for over 20 years and have always made it my business to ask as many real fans of both games as possible what type of game they prefer.. Evidently Mr. Kilpatrick is an American so we will take his national game of baseball to start with.  Nine out of ten ball fans would prefer a ball game ending in a 6-5 score to one finishing in a 1-0 score.

 

As for hockey, I would say the percentage increases. If you would make a survey of hockey fans here in Toronto, or anywhere else in the NHL, you will find it 12 to 1 in favour of a more open game, meaning bigger scores and lesser whistle blowing. After all, it’s the fans who keep the NHL in existence and it seems it is high time they were taken into consideration. Even if it is only to the extent of finding out if they want less whistle blowing and a more open game with more scoring. After all, you must remember the sports writer’s opinions and the fans who pay are often of oppoite views.

I don’t say go back to the old seven man hockey, but before the blue line was brought into effect there was some wonderful hockey played. Not all whistle blowing. Did you ever hear of a fan leaving a game that finished in a scoreless tie that felt he got his money’s worth?