Tag Archives: George Parros

Kassian East, Prust West

Kassian

As you probably know, the Canadiens have sent Brandon Prust to the Vancouver Canucks for big and tough right winger Zack Kassian and a 2016 fifth-round round draft pick.

The 24-year old Kassian not only has good size (6’3, 214 lbs), he’s also tough as nails, although Prust, 31, is no slouch himself when it comes to providing heart, soul, and knuckle sandwiches.

I also temper my feelings by remembering how I thought George Parros would add an important dimension, although Kassian does have some offensive skills to go with his muscle.

Good luck and thanks to Brandon Prust. He was a fine player for the Canadiens and in many ways a leader. And welcome, Zack.

What concerns me is how Prust’s girlfriend Maripier Morin is coping, as her home and career is solidly entrenched in Quebec, and she did mention on Hockey Wives how she dreaded the day Brandon is traded.

It has to be tough for all concerned, and if you don’t mind, I’d like to say a few private words to Maripier. So please don’t read.

“Maripier, I’m only a few hours north of Vancouver. Call me if the move becomes overwhelming. Maybe when Brandon is on a long road trip.”

 

Summer Notes From Habsville

A number of things happened Habs-wise this summer, the most surprising being I was able to decipher the notes I’d made regarding the things that happened Habs-wise this summer.

Gone are Daniel Briere, Josh Gorges, Brian Gionta, Tomas Vanek, Ryan White, Douglas Murray, George Parros, and anthem singer Charles Prevost Linton.

Francis Bouillon, at this writing, remains stranded on the desert island named Limbo. Douglas Murray’s island is slowly sinking. George Parros’ island is somewhere near the lost continent of  Atlantis.

White now finds himself in Philadelphia where one of his jobs will be to protect captain Claude Giroux from grabbing police officers’ buttocks, and Bouillon’s future seems secure. If he doesn’t find a hockey job, the City of Montreal is ready to step in and make him a fire hydrant.

Auditions are now in process for the anthem singing gig. Unfortunately, management, with a somewhat prickly attitude, has informed me that I’m not allowed to be singer AND stick boy.

Forward P.A. Parenteau, from Colorado in exchange for Briere, is now part of the family, and Gorges and Gionta aren’t, as the two UFAs were picked up by Buffalo, a place Gionta is probably happy about being. Gorges, maybe not as much, considering it’s Buffalo.

Parenteau is 31 and hopefully more effective than Briere, who is on the verge (Oct. 7th) of becoming 37. Gorges’ passion and shot blocking will be missed. Gionta’s captaincy will be replaced in a year or two, and until then, Max, Markov, Pleks and P.K. will serve as assistant captains.

In the spirit of fairness, Markov, with the most seniority, should be the one to accept the Stanley Cup from Mr. Bettman next spring.

Signings this summer involved free  agents Manny Malhotra (1-year, from Carolina), Tom Gilbert (2-years, from Florida), and goaltender Joey MacDonald (1-year, from Calgary). And Jiri Sekac from the KHL Lev Praha squad signed a two-year entry level deal.

Those with new contracts include P.K. Subban, at 9 million a year for 8 years. Apparently there is no truth to the rumour that P.K. has bought the Sun Life Building in downtown Montreal to use as his winter residence, so you can stop thinking about that.

Regulars Andrei Markov (3 years), Dale Weise (2-year extension), Mike Weaver (1 year), Lars Eller (4 years), and coach Michel Therrien (4-year extension), also penned their names on paper.

Chosen in the 2014 Entry draft, 26th overall, was Moscow-born Nikita Scherbak, who looks, speaks, and plays like a young Alex Galchenyuk, who’s a grizzled old guy now.

Assistant coach Gerard Gallant is now the head guy in Florida and replaced by Montreal native Dan Lacroix.

Lacroix helped out behind the Rangers bench last year, and if it was he who advised the despicable Chris Kreider to run Carey Price and then Dustin Tokarski, he should be hung by the thumbs outside a Bell Centre window for several hours, and then be forced to teach our guys (aside from Brendan Gallagher) how to run goalies too.

Player Development guru Patrice Brisebois leaves and replaced by former NHLer Rob Ramage. And Trevor Timmins has had the title “Vice President of Player Personnel” added to his “Director of Amateur Scouting” handle.

Timmins is widely respected, particularly in Northern Ontario where they named a small city after him.

Former Canadiens captain Saku Koivu, an ultra-talented battler if there ever was one, retired after 1124 regular season games played, with his last 5 seasons in Anaheim and 13 years and one lockout season with Montreal before that. Thank you Saku, for all you did for the Montreal Canadiens and the city. Which was plenty.

And finally, Mensa member Brad Marchand mentioned that he dislikes Tomas Plekanec quite a bit. “Anybody who spells “Thomas” without  an “H” is a rotten bastard”, said Brad.

Other things could happen in the days and weeks too. If so, just mentally paste them to this.

Habs Unreal (In A Bad Way)

Not much to chat about here.

Not after the Habs sucked more than the septic truck that used to come on the Island Sky ferry and suck the gook out of the tanks.

They don’t want home ice advantage and I don’t blame them. It’s an extra night of not having to endure the blaring techno music the Bell Centre pipes out.

The Canadiens played what was basically an AHL team on Thursday night, the New York Islanders with 11 or 12 raw rookies in the lineup, including 3 AHL defensemen. But it didn’t look like it.

The home team couldn’t score even once. They were bottled up all night. They were confused and uninspired and hopefully the wives make them sleep on the couch tonight.

Blanked 2-0 by the Islanders, who played a great game. The Habs played like the septic truck on the ferry.

But I’m not concerned. They were skating well just 24 hours prior in Chicago. And we’ve seen them flat like this before. Not even Didier Pitre knows why.

Random Notes:

Tampa Bay beat the Flyers 4-2, so they’re doing the right things on the verge of the playoffs, as opposed to what the Canadiens are doing.

They’re saving their motivation for next week.

Douglas Murray slammed Johan Sundstrom head first into the boards, got tossed, and a suspension is a distinct possibility, coming just after he sat for three games for an elbow to the head of Tampa’s Michael Kostka on April 1st.

George Parros was in another scrap, and once again it was nothing to write home about. When we got this guy, I thought we were getting a brute. Instead, we got a paler-skinned Georges Laraque with a mustache.

Both Islanders goals came on the power play.

Shots on goal – Islanders 30, Habs 19.

Luci and I are heading to Quebec City for the weekend. Hopefully there’s a good sports bar near our hotel on the edge of the Plains of Abraham to watch the Canadiens smash the Rangers and Max notch his 40th.

 

 

You Shoot Because You Do

As mentioned on Hockey Inside Out, both Josh Gorges and Dale Weise might be suiting up for Wednesday’s game in Chicago.

All we need now is Brandon Prust and Travis Moen back, and hope  everyone else is as healthy as a 40-year old Jack LaLanne when the real season begins.

Gorges is a left-handed shot, as are Francis Bouillon, Jarred Tinordi, and Douglas Murray, who’s back from his suspension after one more game. Somebody’s gonna take a rest there.

Dale Weise shoots right-handed, as does Rene Bourque and George Parros. So one of those fellows will also be having some down time.

I did a little Googling and found that the majority of Canadian hockey players, young and old, shoot left-handed, while the majority of Americans shoot right-handed.

It’s odd and there are different theories, none of which I had the time to try and understand when I was reading up on it.

And how do they know that folks young and old shoot more left or right? Because since curved sticks became the norm in the 1960s, American hockey manufactures say they’ve been shipping way more lefts than rights to Canada ever since.

It’s sort of the same with golf only different. Seven percent of Canadian golfers swing left, which is apparently the highest percentage of any nation. And the reason they give is because Canadians pick up hockey sticks at an early age and it’s therefore imprinted when it comes time to pick up a golf club.

European players are mostly left-handed shots too, and one site gives the example of the great Soviet teams of the 1980s, some of which never had even one righty on the roster.

I shoot right, write left, my fork is in my left, and I put my right shoe on first if you’re interested.

Habs Spank Sens

It seems there are no normal games when the Canadiens and Senators play each other.

Friday night  in Kanata saw a wild 7-4 win by the Habs over the sinking Sens after spotting Ottawa an early 3-0 lead.

It had been a dismal beginning for the Canadiens to be sure, shockingly finding themselves in a deep hole in under six minutes of play, but soon enough, pucks started finding their way behind a shaky Craig Anderson.

And when the dust had settled, the Canadiens had scored seven straight goals before Ottawa would notch a late one.

This was the same Craig Anderson who stoned the Habs last year in the playoffs. On this night, the Sens might have had better luck with Pamela Anderson.

The DDs burned it up again, with Max getting three plus two assists. Thomas Vanek had three assists and DD two.

I heard recently that some who study advanced stats have decided that because the DD line isn’t great defensively, they could hurt the team and should be broken up.

Talk about throwing water on a beautiful thing.

Guy Lafleur and Steve Shutt weren’t exactly defensive specialists either, but no one was complaining when they were popping 50 or 60 goals a season.

The way this game started, with three goals in under six minutes by Ottawa, it was certainly cause to be concerned. Was it one of those nights for Peter Budaj?

Were the Senators determined to pay back in a big way for being embarrassed at the Bell on March 15th?

Instead, Budaj was great. Tremendously sharp. The DD line would soon catch fire. And it all started when Andrei Markov bounced one in off Anderson from behind the line, near the side of the net.

Then it was off to the races, although the Sens would hit some posts and Budaj had to be sharp as a razor from time to time.

After Markov, the goals just kept coming, almost every second shot went in, and it became Weaver, then Max, Eller, Max, Max and DD, and it’s two big points and the Sens are basically screwed.

Random Notes:

Shots on goal – Ottawa 43, Montreal 23.

P.K. Subban rode the bench for most the first period after not being harder on checks during a couple of Sens goals. PK would see a very low 13:39 of ice time.

I truly disagree with Michel Therrien’s methods regarding P.K. A Norris trophy winner being treated like a raw rookie.

There were several scuffles throughout, including Galchenyuk and Karlsson, Tinordi and Gryba, and Gally and Neil, with a player scrum developing from it. But all in all, it could’ve been worse. It could’ve been a Canadiens-Nordiques type of affair.

George Parros played while Rene Bourque watched from the press box, and George not only almost had an assist on the night, but was also sent out to cool things down when characters like Zach Smith and Chris Neil were getting overly obnoxious.

Max scored his 36, 37th, and 38 goals of the season and when one looks at the top four goal scorers in the league, it’s Corey Perry with 41, Joe Pavelski with 39, Max with 38, and Sidney Crosby with 36.

How great is that?

Next up – Detroit at the Bell Saturday night. Should be a beauty, but more about that later.

 

 

 

Toker Stones Ducks

Dustin Tokarski, in nets for the Canadiens for his very first time, came up big in stopping 39 of 42 shots as the boys beat the quackers 4-3 in a shootout and grab a massive two points and a ton of confidence.

Tokarski had previously seen big time duty in the NHL when he was between the pipes for the Tampa Bay Lightning in 2009-10  for two games and then another five in 2011-12, but he played like a seasoned pro in what must have been a nerve-wracking experience last night.

How great is it when your gold-medalist goes down, backup Budaj, fills in nicely, and then Budaj’s backup, Tokarski, also does his job in fine fashion.

It’s very satisfying for all concerned. Except for other teams and people who hate the Habs of course.

Montreal came out flying and took a big 2-0 lead on goals by Brian Gionta and Max with his 30th of the season (which is a fine season indeed).

Max has been playing on another level since returning from the Olympics. More fire, more jump, more confidence. At the perfect time of the year.

Things got slightly dismal in the second frame when a puck got behind a screened Tokarski, another hit a glass support and caromed in while Toker was preparing to corral it around the boards, and then after a terrible and confused Habs power play, the Ducks took the lead.

At this point, it all could have fallen apart like a great party raided by the cops, but credit to the Canadiens, they never gave up, and in the last minute of the second period, Brendan Gallagher banged it home and game was tied.

The game was scoreless in the third period and overtime, but in the shootout, Desharnais, Briere, and finally Andrei Markov beat Jonas Hiller and it made my heart soar like a Himalayan Snowcock.

This was a Habs team with good legs, with jump (aside from their zero for five power play attempts), and the many Habs fans at Anaheim’s Honda Center certainly must have enjoyed themselves.

I know I did, from the friendly confines of my apartment the morning after. I tried to stay up last night but my eyelids felt like they had pucks stapled to them.

Random Notes:

Shots on goal – Ducks 42, Habs 31

Lars Eller was a healthy scratch, and George Parros was given a small tribute on the screen, in which he gave a heartfelt response. George spent six seasons as a Duck.

A huge win. A road trip like this, against some of the league’s elite, seemed daunting, and although they lost a tight one (2-1) the other night in L.A., they came out with jump against the league leading Ducks, played well, and won the thing.

This has to be great for their confidence, and with Weaver and Vanek poised to join their new team, who knows? Maybe a great march onwards and upwards is in the making.

Coyotes on the agenda tonight (9:00 pm ET), and we’re expecting the same jump and character as we just saw. So c’mon boys, keep it up.

 

Habs Take It To The Bruins

With Peter Budaj coming up big between the pipes and a full team effort in front of him, the Canadiens skate away with a solid 4-1 win in Boston.

And just like that, two wins in row and they’re in everyone’s good books again. Or mine at least. I hate speaking for everyone else.

But I’m sure in yours too.

Because they played well and don’t deserve to have anyone mad at them right now. It’s a night and a tomorrow to savour. Then we’ll see how things go on Saturday.

It was in the air early on, when the game was played often in the Boston end, the boys were working hard and passing well, and slowly but surely we saw the Desharnais, Pacioretty, Gallagher line all over the place, getting chances, stirring things up near the Bruins crease.

We saw Alexei Emelin lay on solid thumps and get pucks in deep from the blueline, including the notching of his first of the season, a seeing-eye blast in the first to open the scoring.

Emelin, like his team, has played better these last couple of games, and seeing him be a force simply stirs the soul. A big tough hombre doing things right instead of wrong.

Like we knew he could because he has.

The Emelin play of late was hopefully just an aberration, lanced and purged, kicked to the curb and exorcised. Never to return.

The big bear also drew Milan Lucic into a penalty after some healthy punishment near the boards, which was nice to see considering it was Lucic who barreled over Emelin last April to put the big Russian out for seven or eight months.

Emelin’s getting back to what he does best. Not being gun shy. Playing with more confidence. Converting rib bones into dust.

And of course there was Brendan Gallagher, sending Max into the clear with a nice pass that Max would convert. And then Gally springing Daniel Briere loose for a fourth goal after Brian Gionta had tipped in a Tomas Plekanec shot.

And  a great feed from Gally to Desharnais which didn’t make it through but was a sensational pass from number 11, who absolutely played one of his finest games of the season.

It was a night for most Habs. Douglas Murray used his strength and was a rock throughout. Rene Bourque had all kinds of shots and good chances. Briere had a goal and an assist.

Michael Bournival was simply flying at times. Bournival’s still finding his way in the league, and in a year or two should be a real key guy.

Even George Parros made some noise, and it was interesting to see him in the Boston crease surrounded by Bruins and not one looked eager to try any of the after-whistle stuff.

Completely different from the mess some of our small guys find themselves in often. Size in the crease is a beautiful thing.

The Bruins were basically quiet throughout because the Canadiens weren’t going to be denied. Certainly they were as fed up with their mediocre play as we were. Maybe more but it’s hard to imagine.

And they played like they’ve moved onwards and upwards.

This was a tremendously important win. Two wins after such a funk they’ve been in lately. With everyone on board and in sync.

It makes my heart soar like an American Three-toed Woodpecker.

And although the Carolina team was probably tired after playing a bunch of games in a short time, Montreal was still full marks for that win and a huge A-plus for their effort at the TD Garden in Boston.

Bruins announcer Jack Edwards is presently crying in the announcer’s private toilet. They’ve taken his belt away from him.

Random Notes:

So great to see Budaj enjoy such a fine game after being on the losing end for his last six outings. Although three of those were in relief of Carey Price.

Shots on goal – Boston 35, Montreal 33.

Tuukka Rask was yanked halfway through after giving up the Gionta goal. It warms my innards.

Also great fun to see dejected Bruins fans leave early.

Next up – Saturday at 1 pm ET, when Tampa Bay comes a callin’. Then 24 hours later, the Winnipeg Jets are at the Bell. Two matinees on Super Bowl Weekend.

 

More George Might

The team had George Parros in the lineup Saturday night and the boys freewheeled, no one on the Hawks paid back Alexei Emelin for his clean bone cruncher on Patrick Kane, and as a bonus, George was parked in front of the net when Andrei Markov opened the scoring.

They should play him every night and see how it goes.

Maybe he’ll end up playing the next thirty six.

Stuff – Including Max Makes Team

I’m at work, I’m very busy, and I can only offer the following, which isn’t much.

Puck drops at 8:30 ET tonight in Dallas, and the question lingers – will the Canadiens continue to smell? We can only wait and see.

The U.S. Olympic team was announced following the Bridgestone Winter Classic, and George Parros isn’t on it.

But Max Pacioretty is.

First a baby boy, and not long after, an Olympic roster spot announcement.

Congrats Max.

And about the Winter Classic, with more than 105,000 fans in attendance at “The Big House” in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

The smallish yet shifty right winger skated casually out of his own end, and suddenly without warning, he burst in. It was like the others were standing still.

You can’t see the 105,000 fans here. They were far, far from the action, which has been my annual beef since these outdoor things began. Even the first row is probably a lousy view for the paying public, considering it’s about fifty feet from the boards.

But that’s their choice so maybe I’ll just shut up.

Anyway, the big rush.