Tag Archives: Frank J. Selke

Your Basic Rocket Contract

Below, the Rocket’s contract for the 1956-57 season, drawn up on a 1954 Northern Electric calendar page, for the sum of $12,000, plus a $2,000 signing bonus.

$12,000 is basically the equivalent of $108,000 in 2017 dollars.

Thanks to Bernie Beland in Sudbury for sending me a photo of this great piece.

Interestingly enough, Rocket’s brother Henri’s rookie contract was drawn up on the very same type of calendar page, but from the year before, 1953, even though Henri’s rookie year was 1955-56.

GM Frank Selke must have held on to his old, out-of-date Northern Electric calendar pages because he was a cheap bastard.

Power Struggles

On Tuesday, July 21, much of Powell River will be experiencing a scheduled BC Hydro power outage from 8 a.m to 6 p.m.

This is the notice we all got, and which has sent ripples of fear throughout.

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An apocalypse. Total darkness, except that it’ll be during the day. Warm beer kegs, closed bars, thawed TV dinners, dripping ice cube trays, melted popsicles. No internet or television. For ten full hours we won’t even know what Donald Trump has said next.

But don’t worry about me. Unless you want to, of course.

Because of this power outage, I’d like to direct this to the Montreal Canadiens front office. If you try to email me about the stick boy job during these blacked-out hours on the 21st, I won’t get it because I’ll be cut off from the rest of civilization. The way pioneers were back in the 1980s, except they had TV then.

The best thing to do is phone. Or email me the next day. Or write me a letter like Sam did (except for the saying no part).

The Writers Get Paid

From my collection, this original accounts payable sheet is from Frank J. Selke, signed at the bottom, to various writers who had contributed stories to the Maple Leafs Gardens program in 1938.

Frank Selke, before he became the iconic GM of the Montreal Canadiens from 1946 to 1964, was an assistant and right-hand man to Conn Smythe in Toronto, from 1929 until ’46, when he moved to Montreal.

The names on this sheet are extraordinary, and when you see a payment of $40 for example, according to the Consumer Price Index, $40 in 1938 is equivalent to $642.23 today. And $25 equals $457.42.

Here they are:

Bobby Hewitson, an NHL referee from 1920 to 1934, was the very first curator of the Hockey Hall of Fame, and was sports editor of the now-defunct Toronto Telegram, a newspaper I delivered when I was 11 or 12. I had the final edition copy for years until my ex-wife threw it out.

Bill Grimes, legendary Boston sportswriter.

Elmer Ferguson, legendary sportswriter for the Montreal Herald and Montreal Star, which spanned 39 years. Elmer was also a radio commentator for the Montreal Maroons (1933-38) and the Canadiens (1938-67). He remains one of the greatest hockey writers of all time.

Tommy Munns, assistant sports editor of the Globe and Mail.

Victor O. Jones, sportswriter for the Boston Globe.

Ted Reeves, a true legend. Played on two Grey Cup Argos teams, and became a beloved sports writer with the Toronto Telegram and Toronto Sun. There’s even an arena named after him in Toronto. He used to write these rambling sports poems, one of which I have in an old program, and his nickname was “The Moaner.”

Fred Jackson, succeed Lou Marsh as sports editor of the Toronto Star.

Hal Straight, sports editor of the Toronto Sun, a man who taught Pierre Berton the ins-and-outs of the newpaper business.

Marc McNeil, sportswriter for the Montreal Gazette.

Bill Roche, sportswriter in Sarnia and Toronto, and hockey author.

Jim Hurley, sportswriter for the New York Daily Mirror.

Harry Scott, sports editor of the Calgary Albertan, who played two seasons for the Montreal Canadiens (1913-14, 1914-15), with Georges Vezina and Newsy Lalonde as teammates.

Please note: I couldn’t find any information about Boaxil O’Meara and John Buss. If anyone can fill me in I would appreciate it very much.

They’d Pay Back The Leafs That April

It was the 59th game in a 70-game schedule, and on this night, February 24th, 1960, the Toronto Maple Leafs would beat the Canadiens 3-1. But Montreal would eventually get the last laugh in April, winning their 5th straight Stanley Cup by sweeping these same Leafs in four games.

The Rocket would retire after this 1959-60 season and Doug Harvey would take over as captain. But because Harvey was heavily involved in creating a players association, and who also marched to the beat of his own drum, both of which didn’t exactly thrill Frank Selke and the rest of management, he would be dealt to the New York Rangers a year later (1961-62). Jean Beliveau would captain the team for the next ten years after Harvey moved on.

It was also only a few months before this 25 cent program went on sale that Jacques Plante would don his mask for the first time, on November 1, 1959, and he would go on to win the Vezina at the end of the season.

What a year. What a program.

 

Selke Pays The Program Writers

From my collection, this original accounts payable sheet is from Frank J. Selke, signed at the bottom, to various writers who had contributed stories to the Maple Leafs Gardens program in 1938.

Frank Selke, before he became the iconic GM of the Montreal Canadiens from 1946 to 1964, was an assistant and right-hand man to Conn Smythe in Toronto, from 1929 until ’46, when he moved to Montreal.

The names on this sheet are extraordinary, and when you see a payment of $40 for example, according to the Consumer Price Index, $40 in 1938 is equivalent to $642.23 today. And $25 equals $457.42.

Here they are:

Bobby Hewitson, an NHL referee from 1920 to 1934, was the very first curator of the Hockey Hall of Fame, and was sports editor of the now-defunct Toronto Telegram, a newspaper I delivered when I was 11 or 12. I had the final edition copy for years until my ex-wife threw it out.

Bill Grimes, legendary Boston sportswriter.

Elmer Ferguson, legendary sportswriter for the Montreal Herald and Montreal Star, which spanned 39 years. Elmer was also a radio commentator for the Montreal Maroons (1933-38) and the Canadiens (1938-67). He remains one of the greatest hockey writers of all time.

Tommy Munns, assistant sports editor of the Globe and Mail.

Victor O. Jones, sportswriter for the Boston Globe.

Ted Reeves, a true legend. Played on two Grey Cup Argos teams, and became a beloved sports writer with the Toronto Telegram and Toronto Sun. There’s even an arena named after him in Toronto. He used to write these rambling sports poems, one of which I have in an old program, and his nickname was “The Moaner.”

Fred Jackson, succeed Lou Marsh as sports editor of the Toronto Star.

Hal Straight, sports editor of the Toronto Sun, a man who taught Pierre Berton the ins-and-outs of the newpaper business.

Marc McNeil, sportswriter for the Montreal Gazette.

Bill Roche, sportswriter in Sarnia and Toronto, and hockey author.

Jim Hurley, sportswriter for the New York Daily Mirror.

Harry Scott, sports editor of the Calgary Albertan, who played two seasons for the Montreal Canadiens (1913-14, 1914-15), with Georges Vezina and Newsy Lalonde as teammates.

Please note: I couldn’t find any information about Boaxil O’Meara and John Buss. If anyone can fill me in I would appreciate it very much.

Have A Nice Trip, Said Toe

Frank J. Selke, Montreal’s Managing Director from 1946 until 1963, had a secretary named Lee Dillon, and I have three things that belonged to Ms. Dillon, two of which I’m showing today, and a third in a little over a month from now.

This first piece is Ms. Dillon’s pass to get into games at the Forum, and how sweet would that have been to have a pass into the Forum?

And below is a greeting card to Ms. Dillon from none other than one of my heroes, Toe Blake.

I’m very proud to own this. Toe Blake was not only the legendary coach wearing the fedora who was at the helm for eight Stanley Cups throughout the 1950’s and 60’s, but who also played on the same team as Howie Morenz in 1936, and was part of the legendary Punch Line with the Rocket and Elmer Lach.

Toe Blake was my kind of coach. Old school, demanded respect, and a winner. Do you think Toe would put up with pampered trillionaire brats? Hah!

Jean Beliveau goes on record as saying Toe was a wonderful guy. Terry Harper told me on the phone that Toe was a real gentleman. And yet he was kicked out of the Forum pool hall for using too much profanity.

Scotty Bowman learned from him. The Rocket considered him a big brother. Players won for him.

And here he writes to Lee Dillon. (And maybe added a few pesos).