Tag Archives: Dunc Munro

Maroon Money Matters

That other Montreal hockey team, the Maroons, which folded in 1938, was as colourful a team as any, and it really is a shame they’re no longer with us. But in the 1930s, the city of Montreal could only support one team, and so the Maroons bowed out.

They had some good stories, though, while they were in business, (although I don’t remember where I got these stories).

Maroon defenceman Dunc Munro was given the largest three-year contract ever offered a player at that time, and in his contract, Munro demanded that he have the rights to print and distribute all the programs for Forum events. He later told Frank Selke that he netted $50,000 profit on the programs per season.

$50,000 in the 1930s works out to more than $400,000 in today’s money.

The Canadiens and Maroons had such an intense rivalry that after one night when the Maroons beat the Canadiens, one of the team directors was so happy he gave Maroons’ star Hooley Smith (in the photo) a fully-equipped farm in Quebec.

Maroons players were big on playing the stock market, and they did really well with the help of fans who gave them tips. The stock market became so important to the players that at one practice, only two showed up because the rest were downtown counting their riches from a rising market.

These guys lived high and mighty with their new wealth until one day in 1929, the stock market crashed and everyone lost their shirts. But it turned out to be a good thing because after the shock had subsided, they settled down and became a fine and dangerous team after they began concentrating on sticks, not stocks.

Habs And Rangers Back A Bit

Mike Wyman posted the clip below on his Facebook page yesterday, which is a minute from a 1932 playoff game between the Canadiens and Rangers.

The title reads – The Lightning Game – Canada beats America in Play-Offs for Stanley Trophy. And in the spring of 1932, both Aurele Joliat and Pit Lepine were injured and didn’t play. So we beat the bastards that night even with key injuries.

At about the 41 second mark, you can see Howie Morenz (number 7) making one of his spirited dashes up ice. A quick sampling of the man’s talent, and so great to see. We need some of that flair on Thursday.

George Hainsworth is in goal for the Canadiens, John Roach is the Rangers netminder, and  Ching Johnson is the big, balding Rangers defenceman rushing near centre ice. Ching trips, like a Ranger should.

Roach’s nickname was “The Port Perry Cucumber”. For Henrik Lundqvist, I like “The Swedish Squash”.

Number 12 for the Habs that you see a couple of times is probably Dunc Munro, who was playing his lone season with the Canadiens, but teammate Georges Mantha, who usually wore number 6, also wore 12 at times during this era.

Toronto won the Cup that year but that’s certainly not interesting.

Good Move By Gomez

Scott Gomez will wear number 11 this coming season for reasons explained here, and regardless of why, I agree that number 11 is better than 91 as there aren’t a lot of low numbers left on the Habs, only numbers 6 and 8 now as the rest are immortalized in the rafters, and number 11 is a fine number. It’s also been popular over the years as 69 different players have called it their own.

I’ve also spent several quality minutes googling the number 11 and here’s an example of what I’ve found;

Number Eleven possesses the qualities of intuition, patience, honesty, sensitivity, and spirituality, and is idealistic. Others turn to people who are ‘Eleven’ for teaching and inspiration, and are usually uplifted by the experience.

I’m thinking “intuition” means Gomez will be unreal in going to where the puck will be going, like Gretzky used to do. “Patience” of course means he won’t panic with the puck when a scoring opportunity presents itself. “Honesty” means we’re going to get an honest effort from Gomez each and every night. “Sensitivity” I’m having a hard time with. We don’t want sensitivity. We want Gomez to play with an edge and shove the odd stick down someone’s throat when it’s deemed necessary.  “Spirituality” I guess means that if Gomez is a spirtitual type, the odds should be in his favour when playing non-spiritual types, like Sean Avery. Finally, “idealistic” probably means Gomez gets what it means to be a Montreal Canadien and will teach all those around him that they’re Montreal Canadiens and the rest aren’t.

Here’s some former number 11’s, at least at some point in their career with the Montreal Canadiens, without naming all 69.

Saku Koivu, of course.
Joe Malone, whom Frank Selke said was the handsomest player to ever play. Of course, Mr. Selke wasn’t around to see Scott Hartnell.
Dunc Munro, the guy who made 50 grand a year when he was with the Maroons, by owning all the program rights.
Tony Demers, who ended up in St. Vincent de Paul Penitentiary on a manslaughter conviction.
Floyd Curry, who first came to Habs camp when he was only 15.
 

A Little Maroons Story While We Wait For Free Agent Stuff

That other Montreal hockey team, the Maroons, which folded in 1938, was as colourful a team as any, and it really is a shame they’re no longer with us. But in the 1930’s, the city of Montreal could only support one team, and so the Maroons bowed out.

They had some good stories, though, while they were in business.

Maroon defenceman Dunc Munro was given the largest three-year contract ever offered a player at that time, and in his contract, Munro demanded that he have the rights to print and distribute all the programs for Forum events. He told Frank Selke later that he netted fifty thousand dollars profit on the programs per season. Imagine $50,000 in the 1930’s?

The Canadiens and Maroons had such an intense rivalry that after one night when the Maroons beat the Canadiens, one of the team directors was so happy he gave Maroons’ star Hooley Smith a fully-equipped farm in Quebec.

Maroons players were big on playing the stock market, and they did really well with the help of fans who gave them tips. The stock market became so important to the players that at one practice, only two showed up because the rest were downtown counting their riches from a rising market.

Maroons players lived high and mighty with their new wealth until one day in 1929, the stock market crashed and everyone lost their shirts. But it turned out to be a good thing because after the shock had subsided, they settled down and became a fine and dangerous team after they began concentrating on sticks, not stocks.