Tag Archives: Doug Harvey Jr.

Doug Jr Helped

I got on the phone in around 2008 and called Doug Harvey Jr, who’s my age and was living in Charlottetown at the time. I don’t even know why I’d do this phone thing from time to time. I was a lousy interviewer.  Sometimes I’d just gap out.

Maybe I should’ve had prepared questions ready before I dialed. Hmm. Never thought of that.

But Doug Jr. told me about how the Rocket, Moore, Beliveau and all the boys would come over to the house., which I thought was neat and slightly different than my dad bringing home buddies from the sign shop.

Doug told me about his ski trips with his wife to BC,  his restaurant in Charlottetown, and how being the son of a famous Montreal Canadiens seemed normal, like any other family.

He helped me with my pathetic interviewing. I think he sensed I needed prompting.

What stood out for me was when he said he’d go to games at the old Forum with his mother and they’d have to wait as Doug Sr. signed every autograph for every fan, regardless of how long it took. His mom would get mad at his dad because young Doug had to get up early for school in the morning.

Doug Jr, in the picture above with his dad, is a really good guy. He made my awkward phone call much easier, and I appreciated it. And by the way, I mentioned this picture to him, which is in my scrapbook, and he said it was taken when his dad was building his house, and he often had help from teammates.

I wrote about this chat and not long after a fellow named Peter Galoska  sent in a comment, explaining that he lived two doors down from the Harvey’s in Montreal when he was a kid, and Dougie Jr was his best friend.

Here’s what Mr. Galoska wrote.

“I lived at 4560 St. Ignatius Avenue, two doors down from Mr. Harvey, and Dougie Junior was my best friend. Along with Johnnie Beatty, another boy on our dead-end street located between Somerled Avenue and the Loyola campus, we terrorized the neighbourhood. It was typical boy-kid mischief stuff like ringing doorbells and running away, throwing snowballs at city buses, and lighting firecrackers off in the local church (OOPS – I wasn’t supposed to give that one away!).

I will never forget Mr. Harvey’s generosity with his time – he was quite often the guest speaker at our Coronation Park hockey league’s year-end banquet and I would burst with pride being able to tell my friends that I knew him personally!

Dougie Jr. and I were always in trouble for some mischief or other – finally, when I was 11, in 1961, my family moved away from St. Ignatius and out to Pointe Claire – this slowed down the amount of time that Dougie and I spent together and we finally drifted away from each other.

One thing that I do remember about Dougie was that he really did seem oblivious about his dad being a star – he never used it to be better than anyone else and he couldn’t really understand why we thought it was such a big thing!”

Peter Galoska

Here’s Doug Jr all grown up, with then-Prime Minister Stephen Harper.

Doug Loses To Doug Jr.

This is a nice 1960 commercial featuring Doug Harvey and son Doug Jr. playing a new table hockey game put out by Imperial Oil celebrating Hockey Night in Canada’s 25th year. The game could be bought for a whopping five bucks.

I spoke to Doug Jr. on the phone several years ago when he owned a restaurant in Charlottetown, and when I asked him what it was like growing up with such a remarkable dad, he said it was completely normal and just like any other family, except for the fact that Jacques Plante, Maurice Richard, Dickie Moore, Jean Beliveau and rest would come over for visits. Which is a little bit different than when the guys from my dad’s paint shop came over to our place after first stopping at the Legion for a few pops..

Big thanks to Beatnik for sending over this neat clip.

Canadiens Didn’t Put On A Show, But Bruce Blake Put On His Dad’s Fedora And Cardigan Sweater

I’m not going to go into great detail about tonight’s 3-2 shootout win over the Carolina Hurricanes, other than it was a bit of a sloppy affair, with the Habs being outshot 33-25 by the quick-skating Canes. The boys also took several bad penalties, including a puck over the boards by Carey Price with two minutes left, that almost cost them the game.

But Saku Koivu pulled it out in the shootout.

My feeling is, the homestand was too long, and a little road trip, beginning Thursday in Minnesota, then back east for stops on Long Island, Columbus, and Toronto, can’t come soon enough.

There’s things to be worked on, that’s for sure. Yes, I know, it’s only October. I’m an impatient man.

But they got their two points, and that’s what we see on paper when all’s said and done.

What I really want to talk about is something that happened before the game began. The Canadiens honoured their three most successful coaches – Dick Irvin, Toe Blake, and Scotty Bowman, and when I saw Toe’s son Bruce, my heart did a little dance.

Bruce Blake came out for the ceremonial faceoff wearing what probably was his dad’s old team cardigan sweater. And if that wasn’t good enough, he put on a fedora which also probably belonged to his dad. So there he was, dressed like his dad dressed in the good old days of the 1950’s and ’60.

It was a tremendous moment, and I hope the younger generation picked up on this.

Last year I had a nice long talk, for about an hour, with Doug Harvey’s son, Doug Jr., and he told me that when he was growing up in Montreal, his best friend was Bruce Blake. Imagine being young kids with dads who were members of the famed Montreal Canadiens of the late 1950’s?

Bruce and Doug Jr. were. (Although Doug said it was like growing up the same as any other family, which is hard to imagine.)

And Doug Jr. told me that Bruce still has all those huge players’ murals that hung in the old Toe Blake Tavern, which sat just down Ste. Catherines Street from the old Forum.

Coming Up:

Thursday’s game in Minnesota should be an interesting affair. Montreal’s record after eight games is 6-1-1 for 13 points. The Wild’s, after seven games, is 6-0-1, also for 13 points.