Tag Archives: Chris Lee

Habs Taste Their Own Medicine

I suppose Devils players thought if Montreal could come back from a 2-0 deficit on Friday and win, why couldn’t they on Saturday?

And so they did, skating away with a 3-2 overtime win over the Canadiens in Montreal, ending a perfectly good Habs winning streak (4 games), and ruining Alex Galchenyuk’s excellent two-goal night that pointed to yet another example of Galchenyuk’s sudden jump into a new and bright stage of his career.

But in true party-killing fashion, the visitors scored two third period goals, the last with just 28 seconds left and Cory Schneider pulled for the extra guy, and the game was tied.

In overtime, the final wall came tumbling down. But the home team got a point and remain in the penthouse, and things are good in general. Really would’ve like a five-game win streak though.

Random Notes:

Shots on goal – Habs 32, Devils 31.

Next up – Tuesday, when the Columbus Blue Jackets come a buzzin’.

The Leafs lost.

I’m truly sorry I have to cut this short, but I have to leave soon. Homer’s saving me a seat at the nearby watering hole.

In the meantime, maybe you’re not aware of this but not long ago, the NHL Board of Governors decided that if any NHL referee is deemed truly horrible and far from being up to scratch, they’re sent to London where they’re sliced up and made into zebra burgers.

I had the ‘Chris Lee’ when I was at a London market last week, and it tasted like shit.

Zebra burger

 

 

Habs Senatized

Sens

I downloaded a free app called Fresh Paint and the picture above is my first stab at it after being confused for several days.

I painted the cross, not the Sens logo of course, plus that little red blob over on the right which was an accident.

I feel the red blob somehow represents Mark Stone, on the outside looking in, currently sitting out a two-game suspension for a hit to the head of Detroit’s Landon Ferraro, and who is probably still recovering from his near-death experience when the evil PK Subban tapped him on the wrist last year.

A trooper, that’s what he is.

I’ll bet Landon’s pop Ray Ferraro  wouldn’t mind tapping this trooper.

Canadiens fell 2-1 in overtime to the visiting Ottawa Senators, although they carried most of the play and outshot the obnoxious pricks 37-27.

But it wasn’t to be as Max and Tomas Plekanec were caught during the newly installed three on three overtime, leaving Jeff Petry to fend off three oncoming Sens, and that was that. Bam. Kyle Turris ended it just 34 seconds in.

This loss is just the Canadiens third of the season, Michael Condon’s first in his five starts, and the first game to go beyond regulation time for the boys. It’s a loss but not something to lose sleep over. They played well, but Craig Anderson, between the pipes for the Sens, did too.

Now it’s time to focus on the N.Y. Islanders, who check into the Bell on Thursday.

In my world, a loss isn’t a disaster, but another after that is getting there, and another after that sucks to kingdom come.

So we need a win on Thursday to avoid all that.

Random Notes:

Dale Weise, with his seventh of the year, scored Montreal’s lone goal. Weise is now tied with Max for goals scored.

Montreal’s power play went 1/3. They also gave up a shorthanded goal to J-G Pageau in the second frame which opened the scoring.

Lars Eller, I felt, played a fine game.

A Habs goal was called back in the first period when referee (and Habs nemesis) Chris Lee ruled that Brendan Gallagher interfered with Anderson in the crease. It was looked at, and the call stood.

I, however, disagree.

Unimpressive Habs

What’s the opposite of smart? The Canadiens in game two.

Blown out 6-2 by the Tampa Bay Lightning, due to a plethora of penalties on a night when the penalty killers couldn’t get the job done and the team as a whole enjoying a nice little Bell Centre sleepover.

The team wasn’t good enough, not by a long shot. 6-2. What the %#*&^ is that?

Penalties killed them, with the boys, led by Brandon Prust, in the box for 53 minutes compared to Tampa’s 13. The Lightning went  4 for 8 with the extra man, while the Canadiens offered up their usual 0 for 3.

And of course, good old Chris Lee was one of the zebras, chosen by the league to work the game (along with Brad Watson). When a referee has a reputation for being a dickhead when working Habs games, why isn’t he assigned another series instead? Wouldn’t it be the thing to do?

I’ll bet Lee’s dad hated the Habs. But regardless, it was mostly Montreal players shooting themselves in the foot all night and not so much anything else.

It had started out well, though, with Jeff Petry sending a wrist shot from the point that beat Ben Bishop and which gave the Habs something as rare as a power play goal – the first goal of the game and an early lead.

Later on, Torrey Mitchell had a great shorthanded chance that might have boosted momentum and made us giddy now instead of the opposite, but it didn’t happen of course. Nothing really happened.

Everything just caved in, beginning when Brandon Prust was given two minutes for roughing and then two for unsportsmanlike conduct for trying, unsuccessfully, to goad Braydon Coburn.

And although the Canadiens killed off the four minutes in impressive style, just seconds later, PK Subban felt the need to do some mindless crosschecking and was promptly sent off, and during PK’s stay in the sinbin, the Lightning quieted the Bell Centre and sent us scurrying to the liquor cabinet by taking the lead with just 24 seconds remaining in the period.

Fast forward to the second period and Steven Stamkos in alone and deking out Carey Price with the greatest of ease, a couple of Lightning power play goals with Gilbert in the box and then Petry, and move on to the third where the Lightning scored once again on the PP to make it 5-1.

Wedged in was a Tom Gilbert goal from the blueline to make it 5-2 before the Lightning added another.

Two goals for the Habs, both from blueliners not known for their goal scoring, while the marksmen up front accomplished nothing. In fact, only Max, in game one, has been able to bulge the twine other than Petry and Gilbert.

It’s tremendously pathetic and discouraging. How do you win playoff games when the boys are on an extended coffee break?

It was also only Habs in the penalty box in the third period to add to the misery, when discipline was needed the most and what obviously didn’t happen. But it was a 4-1 game when the puck was dropped for the third period, so I suppose the game was basically over anyway.

Mitchell for interference on the goalie, Weise a 10 minute misconduct, Mitchell for face-off violation when he grabbed the puck, and Prust for a whack of things including ten minute and game misconducts after tussling with Coburn and throwing an elbow pad into the Lightning bench.

Nutty stuff. Undisciplined and unacceptable, and not the way to be successful in the playoffs. Everybody knows this. But somehow, the Canadiens, in this game two, forgot.

I’ve always loved a feisty team. I’m just not crazy about a dumb team.

Game three on Wednesday night. Another showing like this and we’re screwed. But unless we go down three games to none I’m staying positive. It’s in my blood. Sort of.

 

 

Price & Co. Snuff Sens

Ye Olde Coffin Nail

It wasn’t easy, for the players and for us, but with Carey Price being Carey Price, the Canadiens move on and the Sens don’t.

A big 2-0 shutout win in game six to end the drama. As tense as can be with the Senators swarming the Canadiens goal, with shrieks and oohs and aahs filling Canadian Tire Centre as the Sens poured it on with the clock winding down.

But Price and company withstood those heart-stopping moments, and now wait patiently for the Detroit-Tampa to end, with the Red Wings currently up 3-2 in the series.

Of course, whenever one talks to a Sens fan anytime over the next eight months or so, the conversation will center around the play being  whistled dead when Price bobbled the puck and it was banged home. But from where referee Chris Lee was standing, Price had the puck and that was that.

A good and proper call. Sorry Sens fans.

For the first time in the series, Montreal opened the scoring when Brendan Gallagher batted home a bouncing puck, and overall, the Canadiens as a whole played a fine, hard-working first period.

It’s a beautiful thing when the team is in the lead instead of behind, and not having us wonder if Craig Anderson can be beaten and a game made of it. A much better feeling. Love those leads.

It was just a matter of getting a second goal, which ultimately didn’t happen until Max sent it down the ice into the open net in the dying seconds. We need the Habs to open the scoring more often. It’s much easier on the nervous system and several vital organs. A second goal soon after would be nice too.

The second period saw the Canadiens play their disturbing ‘sit back’ type of game, at one point being outshot 12-1 and totaling 16-3 overall, but Lars Eller rang one off the post and and Tomas Plekanec had an amazing chance to buried it but it sailed over the net instead.

So regardless of the fact the boys were outshot, they still showed slivers of danger. How the air would’ve left the building if Eller or Pleks had buried one of those. It would’ve been a beautiful thing.

In the third period, Canadiens found themselves with a plethora of great chances, including a Parenteau and Mitchell combo on one sequence, Weise on another, and at least two from Brandon Prust. Beautiful chances, and when no light was lit, dark clouds began to form. We knew how these things usually work. Great chances, no goals, and the other team scores shortly after.

That’s how it usually works. Just not tonight. Because Carey Price was Carey Price and his teammates for the most part, stood their ground. Good, grinding hockey while withstanding an Ottawa team that refused to let up.

So nice to be rid of the Ottawa Senators. I’ll spend a couple more seconds thinking about them, and then begin wondering about the Wings and Bolts.

Either will be tough, but nobody said winning the Stanley Cup would be easy. For the players or us.

Random Notes:

Ottawa outshot the Habs 43-20.

Andrei Markov was a bit of a disaster, coughing up pucks, looking slow, showing uncharacteristic sloppiness with the puck from start to finish. We need Markov to be the general and in strict control out there, not a Mike Komisarek or Dion Phaneuf clone.

Hard and effective workers included, among others,  PA Parenteau, who was inserted into the lineup for Brian Flynn; Brandon Prust, who played a feisty game and as mentioned, had a handful of good scoring chances; Brendan Gallagher, who scored what became the winner and was his usual Gallagher self; Lars Eller, who once again was excellent; and of course Price, who rose to the occasion after not exactly being on top of things the other night.

Maybe it was my ears, but I think I heard the wild and crazy Glenn Healy give us what he called a Beatles reference when he mentioned things being “A long day’s night.” It’s “A Hard Day’s Night” Glenn. Or maybe you were thinking of “A Long and Winding Road”. Regardless, leave the Beatles out of your mutterings.

Tampa and Detroit play game six on Monday. We watch and wait.

 

 

 

 

Habs Need Eyesight Checked

The Canadiens fought back in the third period to erase a two-goal Buffalo lead, but lost 3-2 in overtime with two seconds left in a P.K. Subban high-sticking penalty, which was a borderline call by any stretch. And it wasn’t even Chris Lee officiating.

So their winning streak ends at five, but they got a point, and the best thing to do now is start a brand new five-game streak. Or an elusive six-game beauty. They’ve been rebounding all year and they’ll let this slide off them like water off a White-winged Scoter duck.

It wasn’t the most exciting game ever played, but the Habs did make people sit up in their seats after they’d removed much of the rust that had blanketed them early on. They took over, and in the third period Brendan Gallagher did all the work on Max Pacioretty’s goal, and Alex Galchenyuk set up Colby Armstrong’s marker which tied things up.

If I could’ve stood up and cheered I would have. But I’m a bit crippled right now so I had to mostly just smile and maybe grimace slightly.

The kids were involved, especially Gallagher, and TSN’s Ray Ferraro compared our guy to a young Theoren Fleury. Small but plays big. Has all kinds of fire and oodles of talent. I hadn’t thought of this comparison before and I like it.

Hopefully down the road, Gallagher won’t blow a million bucks in one weekend on wine, women, song and a few other things, like Fleury did.

But things should never have been as tight as it was on this night at the Bell Centre. Montreal outshot the Sabres 34-21, including 11-2 in the second period, and aside from that, they missed the net close in way too many times. I don’t think there’s any excuse. They’re trying to thread the needle and they’re missing the mark. I hate that.

Maybe some of guys are spending way too much time on hand-held video games and their eyesight is getting damaged. Michel Therrien may want to monitor the video use on the team. Missing the net more than twenty times was ridiculous and the Habs should have won this game by a healthy margin and been sitting at six straight. Imagine all the rebounds that didn’t happen.

Random Notes:

Habs are on Long Island on Thursday to take on the Islanders. The last time these two met, the Islanders won 6-3, but Montreal began their five-game winning streak just after.

Brian Gionta had a fair amount of zip tonight.

Thanks to all the well-wishers about my back problem. I’ve really done a number on myself here and can barely walk. It’s not the first time I’ve put my back out, but this is one of the most serious I think. But as I say many times, I’m from Orillia, where men are men etc.

 

 

Kane Teasers

NHL referee Chris Lee and his wife are sitting at home when his wife gets up, turns out all the lights, and goes to bad. Chris decides to stay up and read for another hour.
How could he read without lights?

Answer: He was reading braille.

A man saw Gary Bettman crossing the road and swerved to crush him with his tires. All the street lights were off as well as the car’s headlights. There were no other lights on along the road.
How did the man see Bettman?

Answer: It was during daylight.

Brad Marchand is riding a horse. To the right of him is a cliff and in front of him is an elephant moving at the same pace and he can’t overtake it. To the left of him is a hippo running at the same speed and a lion is chasing him.
How can Brad get to safety?

Answer: Get off the merry-go-round.

Scott Gomez works his way into the corner, fights off several others by pushing and shoving, and comes out with the puck. How did he do this?

Answer: He was playing road hockey in a maternity ward.

Imagine Gary Bettman is alone on a boat with a large hole in the bottom. Sharks are swimming around him on all sides and the boat is sinking fast. How does Gary survive?

Answer: Stop imagining.

Tim Thomas’ mother has three girls.  One is named April and one is named May. What is the other named?

Answer: Tim