Tag Archives: Brett Hull

The Controversial Brett Hull Goal

During the third overtime period of game six of the 1999 Cup Finals between the Dallas Stars and Buffalo Sabres, the Stars’ Brett Hull scored the winning goal that gave his team the Stanley Cup.

The Sabres and much of the hockey world screamed blue murder over this, as Hull’s foot was in the crease.

Below is the video of the play and explanation from Supervisor of Officials Bryan Lewis, and below the video are a couple of pucks (both sides), produced afterwards, that kinda show that the lovin’ feeling was lost with Sabres fans.

puck 1

puck 2

puck 3

puck 4

Seeing The Island Sky

Below, the Powell River Kings on board the Island Sky ferry at Saltery Bay, south of Powell River, where I worked until recently. (Although the last few years were on shore working the ramp and selling tickets).

The BCHL Kings were on their way to Nanaimo to face the Clippers and were being serenaded by the ship’s first officer. At this writing, the Kings lead the Clippers two games to one in Island Division playoff action.

The BCHL is wonderful hockey and a host of players end up with hockey scholarships throughout North America.

Many go beyond too.

Brett Hull played for Penticton, Carey Price stopped pucks for Quesnel, Sens forward Kyle Turris starred for Burnaby, and most importantly of course – Scott Gomez dazzled with South Surrey.

Thanks to Beatnik for sending me this. I was there when the Island Sky was a brand new ship having just arrived and it’s nice to see it again. I had worked on two other ships prior to the Island Sky – the Queen of Tsawwassen, which is now in retirement, and the Queen of Chilliwack, that sails the inner passage to Prince Rupert.

Good Wood

Ron Green in Orillia sends along an interesting story from TheStar.com – Hockey Is In Tom Scanlan’s Bones  – about a fellow who bought game-used sticks once owned by the 42 players who scored at least 500 goals in the NHL. The sticks were up for auction last June from Classic Auctions in Montreal.

42 is a lot of sticks, especially when you attach the importance of the players who handled them. I have two that belong in this category – Wayne Gretzky and Jean Beliveau. He has 40 more than me, including the Rocket’s, which has me oozing with envy. I’ve always wanted one of Rocket’s sticks.

There’s a few in the 42 I can do without, starting with Mark Recchi, but all in all, it’s a beautiful pile of timber and good for the guy for being the winning bidder.

For the record, here’s the 42 men who’ve scored at least 500 goals, in order of ranking:

Wayne Gretzky - 894
Gordie Howe – 801
Brett Hull – 741
Marcel Dionne – 731
Phil Esposito – 717
Mike Gartner – 708
Mark Messier – 694
Steve Yzerman – 692
Mario Lemieux – 690
Luc Robitaille – 668
Jaromir Jagr – 665
Teemu Selanne – 663
Brendan Shanahan – 656
Dave Andreychuk – 640
Joe Sakic – 625
Bobby Hull – 610
Dino Ciccarelli – 608
Jari Kurri – 601
Mark Recchi – 577
Mike Bossy – 573
Mats Sundin – 564
Mike Modano – 561
Guy Lafleur – 560
Joe Nieuwendyk – 559
Johnny Bucyk – 556
Ron Francis – 549
Michel Goulet – 548
Maurice Richard – 544
Stan Mikita – 541
Keith Tkachuk – 538
Frank Mahovlich – 533
Bryan Trottier – 524
Pat Verbeek – 522
Dale Hawerchuk – 518
Jarome Iginla – 516
Pierre Turgeon – 515
Jeremy Roenick – 513
Gilbert Perreault – 512
Jean Beliveau – 507
Peter Bondra – 503
Joe Mullen – 502
Lanny McDonald – 500

New Kids In The Hall

Congratulations to Joe Sakic, Mats Sundin, Pavel Bure, and Adam Oates for their induction into the Hockey Hall of Fame, the shrine in Toronto that houses photos, plaques, artifacts, and memories of players who once played  the sport that has become extinct and remembered by oldtimers who think back to a time, like last year, when the game was actually being played and fans would come to the rinks with full wallets and leave with empty wallets.

These are four worthy inductees, all classy, all proficient, and which include two Canadians (Oates and Sakic), one Swede (Sundin), and one Russian (Bure). Bure was a shoo-in to make it big ever since he, Alex Mogilny, and Sergei Fedorov dazzled in the World Junior Championships when they were just young, peach-fuzzed Russkies. I also remember talking to a buddy about Bure and agreeing that this guy must not have had any trouble getting the ladies when he was starring in Vancouver.

Sundin rubbed me the wrong way slightly when he came out of retirement to play for the Vancouver Canucks, taking him until January to actually make up his mind and lace up for a measly five million to play half a season Sundin Helps His Wallet. But a great player, huge at 6’5, 230 pounds, and enjoyed a brilliant career, particularly in Toronto.

Adam Oates was not only a great playmaker but also an excellent musician, teaming up with Daryl Hall to record such smash hits as “Rich Girl” and “Kiss is on my List.” Oh wait, wrong guy. Oates teamed up with Brett Hull in St. Louis to become Hull and Oates, not Hall and Oates. Sorry.

Joe Sakic is from Burnaby, which explains why he’s called Burnaby Joe. A quiet and all-round respected and admired fellow who was such an excellent player, and whom of course would have looked mighty fine in a Habs uniform. He possessed a wicked wrist shot, and just seems to be a fine gentleman, as do the other three as well.

Four great players who deserve to be called Hall of Famers, and I can’t wait to see what their wives, if they’re all married, look like at the ceremony.

 

Rocket’s 500th

Thanks a lot to Beatnik for sending the video below.

It was Glenn Hall in nets for the Hawks who was the victim on the night the Rocket notched his 500th regular season goal, which was the first time a player had reached that milestone. I had breakfast with Hall once when he was in Powell River for the Allan Cup, and although I didn’t mention the goal, I did ask him who the greatest player ever was, hoping he’d say the Rocket. But it wasn’t to be. His answer, and I wasn’t all that surprised, was Gordie Howe. But he did mention that the Rocket scared the hell out of him close in.

Rocket’s 500th was scored on the power play on Oct. 19, 1957 when he took a pass from Jean Beliveau and blasted it home. He was 36 years old, and received a 10 minute standing ovation from the Forum crowd.

Rocket was the first to hit 500, but not the last by a long shot. He now sits 28th on a list of 42 players to have reached this magical mark and beyond, including Wayne Gretzky in first place, who managed a ridiculous 894 when all was said and done. But of the 42 players, only seven scored their 500th in less time than Rocket, who did it in 863 games. (Rocket would score 544 regular season goals before hanging up his skates).

The others who scored their 500th in less games than Rocket would be:

Wayne Gretzky, who got his 500th in just his 575th game, which is mind-boggling. Mario Lemieux made it after 605 games, Mike Bossy in game number 647, Brett Hull scored his 500th during his 741st game. Phil Esposito in his 803rd game, Jari Kurri in his 833rd match, and Bobby Hull in 861 games.

Ron Caron Dies

St. Louis is in Montreal tonight to meet the Canadiens, the same day “The Old Professor,” Ron Caron, passes on. He was 82.

Mr. Caron worked alongside Sam Pollock as their Montreal Canadiens won six Stanley Cups in the 1970′s, and in the early 1980′s became general manager of the St. Louis Blues, where he pulled strings for 10 years and rebuilt a struggling franchise by bringing in young players such as Doug Gilmour, Brett Hall and Adam Oates.

He was an old-school hockey man, excitable and passionate, who had bled bleu, blanc, et rouge, learned in the mecca of hockey, and then like so many others, set out to tackle other hockey challenges.

RIP Mr. Caron

 

Shooting From The Lip

A fellow at work brought in a book for me to read called “Shooting From The Lip” (2004), which is a compilation of hockey quotes. Here’s a few of them…..

My brother Dash hit me on the head with five textbooks in a gym bag. Tie Domi, asked about the hardest hit he’s ever received

Man, is that guy ripped. I mean, I’ve got the washboard stomach, too. It’s just that mine has about two months of laundry on top of it. Shawn Burr on Eric Lindros

Every time I see you naked, I feel sorry for your wife. Jaromir Jagr to teammate Matthew Barnaby

They always try to play with our minds. But that won’t work with our club. We’ve got 20 guys without brains. Bobby Clarke in 1976 when Red Army played Philadelphia

I was young and stupid then. Now I’m not young anymore. Jyrki Lumme on his early years with Montreal

You can always get someone to do your thinking for you. Gordie Howe, during a 1970′s appearance on the Dick Cavett Show, on why hockey players always wear a protective cup but rarely a helmet

It’s about 40% technique and about 75% strength. 6’1″ Canadien Patrice Brisebois, on why he lost a fight to Theo Fleury

Everything was set for us to play a real good game. Then we left the dressing room and everything went to hell. Thrashers coach Curt Fraser

The kids just aren’t the same anymore. Canadien Doug Gilmour after asking a rookie to sneak a case of 24 beers onto the team bus and finding out he only got six cans

Only problem is I was going high on the glove side. Senator Lance Pitlick on scoring his first goal of the season with a low shot to the stick side

Guys, I don’t want to tell you half-truths unless they’re completely accurate. Canadiens coach Alain Vigneault after a loss in 1999

It’s not so much maturity as it is growing up. Bruin Jay Miller, asked if his improved play was due to maturity

Jason Arnott will be here as long as I’m here, for the time being. Oilers GM Glen Sather on Arnott trade rumours

He could rile up the Montreal fans in a hurry. God, sometimes I felt sorry for the man. He must have got a standing ovation when he went shopping. Gordie Howe on Maurice Richard

It’s always good to have the building filled, even if it’s with low-IQ Rangers fans. Islander GM Mike Milbury before a home game against the Rangers

I’m the luckiest man alive. I don’t even like the game and I’m successful at it. Brett Hull

I’d rather fight than score. Dave Schultz

Rocket had that mean look on, every game we played. He could hate with the best of them. Gordie Howe on Maurice Richard

Life is just a place where we spend time between games. Flyers coach Fred Shero

Hockey is like a religion in Montreal. You’re either a saint or a sinner., there’s no in-between. Patrick Roy

Hmmm, 600 games? What does it mean? It means I’m that much closer to getting fired. Jacques Lemaire after coaching his 600th game

Playing with Steve Guolla is like playing with myself. Shark Jeff Friesen on his teammate

What I’ve learned so far is that to win the Stanley Cup, you have to make the playoffs. Caps owner Ted Leonsis

Every time I get injured, my wife ends up getting pregnant. Blackhawk Doug Wilson

I don’t care if we lose every game for the next five years and the team goes broke and moves to Moose Jaw. I will not trade Pavel Bure. Canucks GM Brian Burke several weeks before trading Bure to to the Panthers

Brian Sutter said I looked liked Charles Manson. He called me Charlie, then it became Killer. Canadien Doug Gilmour on the source of his “Killer” nickname

 

Local Guys Make Good

I’d like to give a big shout out to three Powell Riverites after Canada West beat Canada East 4-2 in in the World Junior A Challenge held in Langley BC the other day.

For those unaware, I live in Powell River.

Head coach of the Powell River Kings, Kent Lewis, was behind the bench for the gold medal team.  Kings forward Evan Richardson scored one of the West goals in the final. and goaltender Sean Maguire is also a King and was voted to the tournament all-star team.

I don’t know the two players but I know Kent Lewis, and he’s a gentleman and a fine hockey man. Who knows, maybe he’ll become a bench boss in the NHL some day. Maybe he’ll replace Jacques Martin!

This tournament featured Tier 11 Junior players from Canada West and Canada East, along with teams from Sweden, Russia, the U.S. and the Czech Republic, all going head-to-head, and I wasn’t there but my friend Wayne was, and he said it was fantastic hockey which you can well imagine.

These teenage players in Tier 11 hockey don’t usually go the route of Major Junior players, who focus on making it to the pros. Tier 11 guys end up with university scolarships instead, although there have been exceptions. Brett Hull came out of the British Columbia Hockey League from the Penticton Knights, Milan (POS) Lucic was a member of the Coquitlam Express, and Carey Price donned the pads for the Quesnel Millionaires before he moved up to Tri-City. There’s been a bunch of ex-BCHLers who made the bigs.

The Powell River Kings used to come into the restaurant I owned in Powell River in the late 1990′s and you can’t believe how much these young guys can eat.

Anyway, congratulations to Kent, Evan, and Sean. It must have been a fantastic experience.

Guest Blogger With A Great Name Tells His Story

A fellow in Vermont contacted me after finding this site, and sent in this story.  He and I have one major thing in common. We have the same name. 

The Hockey Story of another Dennis Kane
 
I recently came across your site and was drawn, I admit, less because I am a die-hard fan of the Canadiens, than because I think you are the first other Dennis Kane I have come across.  I am, I’m sure you will be relieved to know, a hockey fan, both my daughters and my son played through high school.  The oldest two played club hockey in college and the youngest is aiming to play in college next year.  She is now playing for the Taft School in Connecticut.  So I have been to countless youth games.
 
I was raised in New Jersey and was never a hockey fan growing up.  Upon moving to Vermont to go to graduate school I discovered the college game where a ticket to get into some University of Vermont games was as tough as getting in to see the Yankees when they were winning.  What really got me hooked was following UVM when Martin St Louis, Tim Thomas and Eric Perrin played together and the team went to the Frozen Four.  St. Louis and Perrin were amazing to behold and once I saw St. Louis come within 1 second of scoring a hat-trick of short-handed goals.
 
My friend and I started a tradition of taking my son and his friend to college conference tournaments every spring for eight years and they still talk about those trips to rinks all over the northeast US.  We also began to follow the UVM players in the NHL including John LeClair, Patrick Sharp and now, Torrey Mitchel of the Sharks and so have seen a bunch of games of the Lightning, Bruins and Blackhawks.
 
My one hockey experience at the Fourm was watching the USA play Canada in the World Cup and seeing Gretzky, LeClair, Hull  and a host of majors stars play an amazing game (from our perspective, anyway).  It was quite an experience cheering for the USA at that game.  Not much of a hockey history compared to a life-long Canadiens fan I’m sure.
 
I still live in Vermont.  I’m 60 years old and play in a fantasy hockey league with my son and his friends. (I won last year).  My branch of Kanes was for many years in northern NJ and has been traced to Ireland.
 
I put your site on my favorite list and will be checking in on my hockey rounds.  The Canadiens look good this year and seem to be strong in every position.  It would be a great thing for them to win it all this year.
 
Nice to come across you.  You might be interested to know that I have always remembered when I was in high school in some literature class the teacher used my/our name as an example of a particularly smooth sounding phrase, a “euphonious” phrase that she compared to Mark Twain’s favoite of “cellar door”……..go figure……my 15 seconds of fame.
 
Nice to come across you
 
dennis

Dennis Kane
Director
VT Higher Education Collaborative
VTHEC.org