Tag Archives: Brandon Prust

Boys Bombed In Game 10


They were never in it but the Canucks were, and the streak ends at nine as the Canadiens are bombed 5-1 at Rogers Arena in Vancouver.

Carey Price allowed five goals in this one-sided fiasco after giving up a total of just nine in his seven other starts. And for the first time this season, the gang allowed a first period goal. Three in fact.

Now they have to start a new streak, beginning Thursday in Edmonton.

I knew I shouldn’t have had the team up to Powell River yesterday for beer, karaoke, and magic mushrooms.

Random Notes:

The Canucks outshot Montreal 28-26.

Habs power play – 0/2

Torrey Mitchell scored the long Habs goal.

Brandon Prust recorded two assists for his new team, and then did what appeared to be serious damage to his foot or ankle while crashing into the boards. Hopefully this fine ex-Hab is okay.

It’s late. Ten o’clock here on the coast. Past my bedtime. Back east, where it’s 1 or 2 am (2:30 in Newfoundland), many are sawing logs and oblivious to this slaughter. Lucky bastards.

Kassian East, Prust West


As you probably know, the Canadiens have sent Brandon Prust to the Vancouver Canucks for big and tough right winger Zack Kassian and a 2016 fifth-round round draft pick.

The 24-year old Kassian not only has good size (6’3, 214 lbs), he’s also tough as nails, although Prust, 31, is no slouch himself when it comes to providing heart, soul, and knuckle sandwiches.

I also temper my feelings by remembering how I thought George Parros would add an important dimension, although Kassian does have some offensive skills to go with his muscle.

Good luck and thanks to Brandon Prust. He was a fine player for the Canadiens and in many ways a leader. And welcome, Zack.

What concerns me is how Prust’s girlfriend Maripier Morin is coping, as her home and career is solidly entrenched in Quebec, and she did mention on Hockey Wives how she dreaded the day Brandon is traded.

It has to be tough for all concerned, and if you don’t mind, I’d like to say a few private words to Maripier. So please don’t read.

“Maripier, I’m only a few hours north of Vancouver. Call me if the move becomes overwhelming. Maybe when Brandon is on a long road trip.”


Boys Bomb Bolts

Such a character win by the Canadiens. I’m prouder than a peacock.

They’ve could’ve folded the tent after that murderous last-second goal in game three, but instead, they game out flying, got that first goal early, then another and another, and the series now shifts back to Montreal after the gang that couldn’t shoot straight took out the cocky Lightning with a tremendous 6-2 shellacking.

It was interesting to see one of the Tampa players in the corridor minutes before the game, shown during the first intermission, singing and having a grand old time. Sing some more, buddy. Maybe the blues? Maybe a hurtin’ tune?

Finally the breaks went the Canadiens way. Pucks that stayed out before went in this time. Ben Bishop was chased after the third goal and his replacement, Andrei Vasilevsky, was fairly lousy. Fans left early to water their palm tress.

Heck, Montreal even managed a power play goal, which in itself, is a mind blower of epic proportions. And Max’s shorthanded marker left me hanging from the chandelier.

Two goals in the first period, beginning with Andrei Markov converting a PK setup from a slightly difficult angle.

Next was Max’s shorty, and in the second period, Bishop was yanked after gloving a DD slapshot but then losing it. Craig Simpson on HNIC disagreed with coach Jon Cooper’s decision to switch goalies, but it worked for me.

The score became a juicy 4-0 when Jeff Petry, on the power play, finished it off after PK and Chucky and the gang threw it around in fine style, and just 15 seconds later, Brendan Gallagher let go a blast from the right side that Vasilevsky is still looking for.

It was good, real good, although Tampa would beat Carey Price twice after the 5-0 score was built, with their second just 17 seconds into the third. The Lightning weren’t going to pot three more, no way, but I was nervous anyway.

Brandon Prust converted Lars Eller’s rebound in the third period, the Bolts were officially fried, and it’s back to the Bell for a rousing game five and another one shift, one game at a time deal.

Random Notes:

Canadiens once again handily outshot Tampa, this time 40-24. Last night it was 31-19. And people say the Lightning are the better team?

I saw the game in a somewhat different place with a bunch of distractions that included that call from producers telling me I’m a “World’s Most Handsome Man” finalist. Pissed me off. So did that photo shoot with the Playboy bunnies during the second intermission.

But I still saw the game. I just wish these people would leave me alone.





Up Against The Brotherhood?

Former referee Kerry Fraser says that after the Brandon Prust/Brad Watson dustup, the Canadiens will be in tough against not only Tampa, but the zebras as well – Refs Will Punish.

Officials are a brotherhood and they don’t like being shown up, is what Fraser more or less said as he backed off from his hairspray for a few seconds.

What happened to the idea that officials simply make the right call, regardless of the team? That’s what it’s supposed to be, but now they’re going to let things slide in favour of the Lightning?

Is this professional? Are the officials going to have a say in how this series plays out because Brad Watson isn’t crazy about Brandon Prust? What kind of third world sport are we dealing with here?

Not to excuse Prust or his teammates. They were all pathetic in game 2 and deserved to lose, although they were still in the game until PK was sent to the box near the end of the first period for a needless crosscheck and Tampa scored with just 24 seconds left to grab the lead and the momentum.

The Habs can’t score, and their special teams are the opposite of special. Can’t put ’em in and can’t keep ’em out. They were horrible in game two.  It was embarrassing. And I’m worried about Maripier Morin and how she’s holding up.

But if they come out in game 3 and play a great game but get shanked by the referees and lose a heartbreaker because of the striped brotherhood’s ‘all for one, one for all’ mentality,  after Fraser said what he said, do you think the league might call a few of the culprits up on the carpet and maybe change the way things are done? Or maybe not?

Habs haters are all over this. We’re a whiny bunch and getting what we deserve, they say as they scratch themselves and smash empty beer cans against their head. And if the Canadiens lose because the officials decided such, they’ll laugh and carry on and scratch and smash beer cans, until it happens to their team. Then they’ll cry that life isn’t fair and it’s only the Montreal Canadiens that get the sweet calls.

And one last thing before I sign off and cut the lawn. At least Prust showed fire, unlike so many others.



Unimpressive Habs

What’s the opposite of smart? The Canadiens in game two.

Blown out 6-2 by the Tampa Bay Lightning, due to a plethora of penalties on a night when the penalty killers couldn’t get the job done and the team as a whole enjoying a nice little Bell Centre sleepover.

The team wasn’t good enough, not by a long shot. 6-2. What the %#*&^ is that?

Penalties killed them, with the boys, led by Brandon Prust, in the box for 53 minutes compared to Tampa’s 13. The Lightning went  4 for 8 with the extra man, while the Canadiens offered up their usual 0 for 3.

And of course, good old Chris Lee was one of the zebras, chosen by the league to work the game (along with Brad Watson). When a referee has a reputation for being a dickhead when working Habs games, why isn’t he assigned another series instead? Wouldn’t it be the thing to do?

I’ll bet Lee’s dad hated the Habs. But regardless, it was mostly Montreal players shooting themselves in the foot all night and not so much anything else.

It had started out well, though, with Jeff Petry sending a wrist shot from the point that beat Ben Bishop and which gave the Habs something as rare as a power play goal – the first goal of the game and an early lead.

Later on, Torrey Mitchell had a great shorthanded chance that might have boosted momentum and made us giddy now instead of the opposite, but it didn’t happen of course. Nothing really happened.

Everything just caved in, beginning when Brandon Prust was given two minutes for roughing and then two for unsportsmanlike conduct for trying, unsuccessfully, to goad Braydon Coburn.

And although the Canadiens killed off the four minutes in impressive style, just seconds later, PK Subban felt the need to do some mindless crosschecking and was promptly sent off, and during PK’s stay in the sinbin, the Lightning quieted the Bell Centre and sent us scurrying to the liquor cabinet by taking the lead with just 24 seconds remaining in the period.

Fast forward to the second period and Steven Stamkos in alone and deking out Carey Price with the greatest of ease, a couple of Lightning power play goals with Gilbert in the box and then Petry, and move on to the third where the Lightning scored once again on the PP to make it 5-1.

Wedged in was a Tom Gilbert goal from the blueline to make it 5-2 before the Lightning added another.

Two goals for the Habs, both from blueliners not known for their goal scoring, while the marksmen up front accomplished nothing. In fact, only Max, in game one, has been able to bulge the twine other than Petry and Gilbert.

It’s tremendously pathetic and discouraging. How do you win playoff games when the boys are on an extended coffee break?

It was also only Habs in the penalty box in the third period to add to the misery, when discipline was needed the most and what obviously didn’t happen. But it was a 4-1 game when the puck was dropped for the third period, so I suppose the game was basically over anyway.

Mitchell for interference on the goalie, Weise a 10 minute misconduct, Mitchell for face-off violation when he grabbed the puck, and Prust for a whack of things including ten minute and game misconducts after tussling with Coburn and throwing an elbow pad into the Lightning bench.

Nutty stuff. Undisciplined and unacceptable, and not the way to be successful in the playoffs. Everybody knows this. But somehow, the Canadiens, in this game two, forgot.

I’ve always loved a feisty team. I’m just not crazy about a dumb team.

Game three on Wednesday night. Another showing like this and we’re screwed. But unless we go down three games to none I’m staying positive. It’s in my blood. Sort of.



Price & Co. Snuff Sens

Ye Olde Coffin Nail

It wasn’t easy, for the players and for us, but with Carey Price being Carey Price, the Canadiens move on and the Sens don’t.

A big 2-0 shutout win in game six to end the drama. As tense as can be with the Senators swarming the Canadiens goal, with shrieks and oohs and aahs filling Canadian Tire Centre as the Sens poured it on with the clock winding down.

But Price and company withstood those heart-stopping moments, and now wait patiently for the Detroit-Tampa to end, with the Red Wings currently up 3-2 in the series.

Of course, whenever one talks to a Sens fan anytime over the next eight months or so, the conversation will center around the play being  whistled dead when Price bobbled the puck and it was banged home. But from where referee Chris Lee was standing, Price had the puck and that was that.

A good and proper call. Sorry Sens fans.

For the first time in the series, Montreal opened the scoring when Brendan Gallagher batted home a bouncing puck, and overall, the Canadiens as a whole played a fine, hard-working first period.

It’s a beautiful thing when the team is in the lead instead of behind, and not having us wonder if Craig Anderson can be beaten and a game made of it. A much better feeling. Love those leads.

It was just a matter of getting a second goal, which ultimately didn’t happen until Max sent it down the ice into the open net in the dying seconds. We need the Habs to open the scoring more often. It’s much easier on the nervous system and several vital organs. A second goal soon after would be nice too.

The second period saw the Canadiens play their disturbing ‘sit back’ type of game, at one point being outshot 12-1 and totaling 16-3 overall, but Lars Eller rang one off the post and and Tomas Plekanec had an amazing chance to buried it but it sailed over the net instead.

So regardless of the fact the boys were outshot, they still showed slivers of danger. How the air would’ve left the building if Eller or Pleks had buried one of those. It would’ve been a beautiful thing.

In the third period, Canadiens found themselves with a plethora of great chances, including a Parenteau and Mitchell combo on one sequence, Weise on another, and at least two from Brandon Prust. Beautiful chances, and when no light was lit, dark clouds began to form. We knew how these things usually work. Great chances, no goals, and the other team scores shortly after.

That’s how it usually works. Just not tonight. Because Carey Price was Carey Price and his teammates for the most part, stood their ground. Good, grinding hockey while withstanding an Ottawa team that refused to let up.

So nice to be rid of the Ottawa Senators. I’ll spend a couple more seconds thinking about them, and then begin wondering about the Wings and Bolts.

Either will be tough, but nobody said winning the Stanley Cup would be easy. For the players or us.

Random Notes:

Ottawa outshot the Habs 43-20.

Andrei Markov was a bit of a disaster, coughing up pucks, looking slow, showing uncharacteristic sloppiness with the puck from start to finish. We need Markov to be the general and in strict control out there, not a Mike Komisarek or Dion Phaneuf clone.

Hard and effective workers included, among others,  PA Parenteau, who was inserted into the lineup for Brian Flynn; Brandon Prust, who played a feisty game and as mentioned, had a handful of good scoring chances; Brendan Gallagher, who scored what became the winner and was his usual Gallagher self; Lars Eller, who once again was excellent; and of course Price, who rose to the occasion after not exactly being on top of things the other night.

Maybe it was my ears, but I think I heard the wild and crazy Glenn Healy give us what he called a Beatles reference when he mentioned things being “A long day’s night.” It’s “A Hard Day’s Night” Glenn. Or maybe you were thinking of “A Long and Winding Road”. Regardless, leave the Beatles out of your mutterings.

Tampa and Detroit play game six on Monday. We watch and wait.





Canadiens Fail To Sweep

Before I start, there’s something you might not have heard. Mark Stone has a sore wrist.

It’s back to Montreal for game five on Friday after the Canadiens were shut out 1-0 by the Sens and that’s fine. They’re still up 3 games to 1. And they didn’t deserve to win anyway.

Montreal just didn’t have it, pretty well right from the get-go. It was easy to sense that they were off, and they never managed to be on.

There was never any huge pressure on Craig Anderson. They were forced to defend way too much. Passes missed tape, they seemed disorganized, they had way too much trouble keeping pucks inside Ottawa’s blueline, and abundant scoring chances weren’t happening.

Ottawa was better than the Canadiens on this night, although they weren’t all that great either. They could’ve been had if Montreal showed more fire. But there was no fire.

Maybe when Brandon Prust came close to scoring on a shorthanded breakaway. Maybe a couple of other times. And Carey Price was good. But overall, no fire.

It took until the third period before a goal was scored, coming when Tom Gilbert was way too soft in trying to shoot the puck out of his end, which didn’t happen. Gilbert then scurried to the front of the net where he managed to help screen Carey Price as Mike Hoffman’s shot bulged the twine.

Gilbert’s wife is part of the seven Canadiens wives watching a period of hockey with a couple of lucky contest winners and I hope the winners remained nice to Mrs. Gilbert. I know I would have.

But regardless of Gilbert’s faux pas, the team was off for most of the sixty minutes. But I guess if they’re going to be bad, being it with a three-game lead is sort of okay.

The Sens and their fans are certainly happy the series goes back to Montreal. I’m assuming Geoff Molson doesn’t mind that much either.

Not a great night but the boys are still in the driver’s seat. That’s the main thing. Just close it off on Friday and be done with it.

Random Notes:

Did someone forget to freeze the pucks for this game? They were bouncing around all night. And did I mention that Mark Stone has a sore wrist?

Ottawa outshot Montreal 32-28.

The Canadiens went 0 for 3 on the power play. Of course.


The Contest

I move out of Montreal and not long after they come up with this contest – Watch a game with the Canadiens wives. Talk about lousy timing.

The wives of Carey Price, Lars Eller, Torrey Mitchell, Tom Gilbert, Dustin Tokarski, and Mike Weaver, plus the lovely and talented Maripier Morin, girlfriend of Brandon Prust, will show up in a limo at a couple of winners’ homes to watch a period of tonight’s game four vs the Sens.

But I’m in BC, shut out from any chance of doing something very high on my list.  Although one lousy period with the ladies isn’t exactly what was on the list.

It’s not right that because I’m so far away I can’t win this and I’m wondering if the Canadiens will hold another such contest down the road, for out-of-towners like me. But only for those in Powell River. And whose name is Dennis Kane.




I was worried about a couple of things. And then I wasn’t.

Of course there was that 1-0 lead Ottawa had, and were wearing our guys down with some serious banging and new-found vim and vigour.

And I was worried that I’d have to endure Sens fans and media go on for the next two and a half days about how the gang from Kanata is back in it, and how Erik Karlsson took the bull by the horns and led his team to victory.

But Dale Weise had something to say about all that.

With the Sens holding on to a 1-0 lead well into the third frame after Clark MacArthur had beaten Carey Price midway through the first, it looked dismal for the boys, who were hit hard and often, and who simply couldn’t solve Craig Anderson any which way.

They also went 0/6 on the power play, which is basically the same old song and dance, and for all intents and purposes, they seemed quite done.

But Dale Weise, switched to the fourth line with Brandon Prust and Torrey Mitchell, tied things at 14:13 of the third, and in overtime it was Weise again, sending a shot from the left side that Craig Anderson, in nets in place of Andrew Hammond, should have snagged but didn’t.

Weise’s heroics puts his team up three games to none, and even the most optimistic of Sens fans might have to concede the fact that their team is probably done.

I say good riddance anyway.

Ottawa opened the scoring after PK Subban took a Patrick Wiercioch stick to the head with no call on the play, and later on, Erik Karlsson nailed Nathan Beaulieu at centre ice with a check to the head, also with no call.

The explanation from Don Cherry regarding the Subban stick to the head? Because he’s Subban. Which might be the case, but shouldn’t be. And Beaulieu sat on the bench for all of the third, plus the overtime, possibly because of the illegal hit which should have sent Karlsson to the showers.

Montreal’s power play was as pathetic as it’s been all season, all six chances including one in overtime when they had a chance to make amends. But it wasn’t to be of course.

All this after the PP looked fairly formidable in the previous two games.

But whatever. Because even though the Senators bashed and bruised, including the handing out of 27 hits to Montreal’s 16 in the first period alone, they still find themselves in the deepest of holes, and are now on life support.

Ain’t life grand!

Random Notes:

The Canadiens outshot Ottawa 49-34, but were outhit 61-36.

Now we wait until Wednesday for game four. But we wait while feeling high, and Sens fan feeling low.