Tag Archives: Brad Marchand

Here’s To You, Historic Habs


I saw the Beatles at Maple Leaf Gardens in 1966, and Janis and Zappa in Atlantic City in ’69.

I saw Led Zeppelin in Vancouver in ’73, and Evel Knievel sail over 13 Mack trucks on his motorcycle at the CNE in ’74.

NOn my TV in Orillia I saw the Kennedy assassination in ’63, and Neil Armstrong set foot on the moon in ’69.

And from my couch in Powell River in 2016, I saw the Montreal Canadiens have their lousiest season in 75 years.

The historic Habs.

Something to tell my grandchildren.

And their fifth loss in a row (forget the overall loss tally) was against the Boston Bruins, with good old Brad Marchand scoring one of four Bruins goals as his team rolled over the hometown Habs 4-1.

It’s the Twilight Zone, baby.

It was last year when Marc Bergevin gave Michel Therrien a four year contract extension that kicked in this season, at $2 million per, and which takes him to 2019.

This was the report at the time;

Montreal re-signed Michel Therrien to a four-year contract extension Saturday, two weeks after the Canadiens were eliminated from the Stanley Cup playoffs.

“It really shows the stability that [general manager] Marc Bergevin and [owner] Geoff Molson want to establish with the Canadiens,” said Therrien on a conference call. “We’ve progressed a lot over the past two years and we want to continue to progress. It’s a sign of confidence.”

Continue to progress. Yes indeed.

Oh, you like Michel Therrien and argue that it’s not his fault this team is on the fast track into the depths of hell? Do you think getting Jonathan Drouin is the answer instead?

I don’t want my historic times tampered with. So lose boys. And then charge fans for your autograph on your days off.

Random Notes:

Canadiens outshot the Bruins 39-24, with their lone goal coming from d-man Mark Barberio. The sharpshooters are still on their extended lunch break.

Next up – Habs in Toronto on Saturday. Imagine.

Cole Palmer’s Cool Cartoons

Hockey artist Cole Palmer has sent over his latest creation, which deals with the dastardly Brad Marchand and his three-game suspension for his lowdown takeout of Ottawa’s Mark Borowiecki.

I don’t mind anyone taking out a Sen, but it’s Marchand we’re talking about here. And fittingly, his suspension kept him from playing in last week’s Winter Classic, where his teammates were kicked around in solid fashion by the Habs.

Mr. Palmer is a big time talent, there’s no denying, and you can see his other unique works at his website The Hockey Comic.com .

Cole Palmer

Habs Eat Bruins


Nice work by the Galchenyuk, Eller, Semin line as the Habs doubled up the Bruins 4-2 in Boston, thus giving the boys two straight wins to start the season after taking out the Torontonians 3-1 on Wednesday.

Galchenyuk’s line oozed chemistry, with Chucky collecting three assists, Eller two goals, and Semin a pair of assists. A fine early season line that dominated often and enjoyed quality minutes in Boston’s end of the ice. Unlike their team’s power play.

David Desharnais lit the lamp in the first period on the team’s initial power play, but after that it was more of the pathetic, lackluster, confused man-advantage situations that we saw on most nights last year. When the ice chips had settled, it was another of those 1-6 PP outings we’ve gotten used to, and darn tired of.

But it is only game two with eighty more to go, so maybe I should just settle down and give it time. They promised better things and who am I not to believe them? A promise is a promise.

Regardless, two points in the standings, a big night for Galchenyuk and company, and I give big thanks on this Canadian Thanksgiving weekend for the two wins to kick off the season.

Things could be worse.  They could be the 0-3 Leafs.

Random Notes:

Montreal outshot Boston 38-21.

Brad Marchand was hurt in the third period and slowly made his way to the bench after milking it on the ice for a minute or two. Marchand told reporters later that he felt fuzzy and was worried he wouldn’t be able to finish the comic book he began reading last May.

Carey Price sent the puck towards Boston’s empty net but missed. A Price goal would be the coolest thing. It’d put him up in the Scott Gomez net-bulging stratosphere.

A Bruins marker was waved off because of goalie interference by Patrice Bergeron, and after Claude Julien’s coach’s challenge, it was ruled “no goal”. It was a no brainer to me and ten thousand others, and Julien, whose job is on thin ice, lost his time-out because of it.

Tomorrow, for those wild and crazy Montreal Canadiens, it’s Ottawa, the team that blew a three-goal lead to the Leafs on this night, but still won in the shootout.




Well I Woke Up Sunday Morning

It’s Sunday morning and although the grass needs cutting, I can’t get out there and do it because a little baby is sleeping. What a fantastic excuse!

Nathan Beaulieu has signed a two-year contact with the Habs, at a million per. Great to  have this done, it doesn’t break the bank, and it should inspire the young fellow to be all he can be and ink a whopper in a few years.

It seems like only yesterday that we debated the idea of who would win a full-time job first, Beaulieu or Jarred Tinordi, but Beaulieu came through with his skating, puckhandling and poise, while Tinordi lagged behind because of his tentativeness with the puck. But we can’t give up on the big fellow, mainly because he’s a big fellow.

And regarding Beaulieu and his dad’s assault charge in 2013, it came to light only recently that the two had heard someone at a party saying Kane’s blog sucked and they naturally took matters into their own hands. “Nobody says that and gets away with it,” said papa Jacques Beaulieu.

The Leafs have signed former Leaf Wally Stanowski to a one-year deal. Stanowski, 96, says he’s anxious to suit up as it’s been awhile, and if someone can help him onto the ice and then off again, he feels he should be at least as mobile as Dion Phaneuf, and probably a better fighter.

Below, Wally at a recent press conference. “With Montreal inking Beaulieu, we felt this signing was necessary to keep pace,” said Leafs president Brendan Shanahan. “All we ask is that he quits smoking.”


Other tidits: The Chicago Blackhawks have taken a 3-2 series over Tampa Bay, the Arizona Coyotes are in building lease trouble, and NBC’s Sports Chairman Mark Lazarus says playoff beards should go.

It’s hard to know which is the most important of the three. Probably the Cup Final, although as a Habs fan, any playoff passion has been squeezed out like that last drop from a bottle of Four Aces. And then, of course, the Coyotes situation, which everyone should be used to by now, and which could possibly end with Quebec getting their well-deserved team.

But the beard thing is definitely important too.

“I just don’t like the beards,” said Lazarus. “You can’t see their faces. Although, for that very reason, it was good when Brad Marchand grew one.”

For me, I don’t know what to think. The Rocket and Beliveau never grew playoff beards. What about that?

Below, Lazarus at his recent press conference, explaining the beard problem.


Habs Take Out Bruins


Milan Lucic, pictured above, screwed any chance of his team catching the Habs late in the game when he was sent off for mugging Alexei Emelin with just over a minute left and his team down a goal.

Lucic isn’t the smartest thug. Probably most gangsters aren’t. If this was Chicago of the 1930s, he’d be wasting away in Alcatraz instead of making millions as a boneheaded Bruins hothead.

Although he might be slightly brighter than teammate Brad Marchand. I’m just guessing. It’s hard to tell.

Shortly after Lucic’s temper tantrum against Emelin, who had leveled the thug early in the game with a juicy and clean hit,  the Canadiens on the power play saw P.A. Parenteau find the empty net, his second marker of the night, and the boys skate off with a solid 6-4 win over the Bruins.

It was a dandy night for Brendan Gallagher, who notched two goals and added an assist, and led his team in grit and points and heart and desire.

The team would end their power play woes, with two out of three chances bulging the twine.

Jiri Sekac finally scored his first NHL goal, with his family and girlfriend in the crowd, and you can’t much better than that. Dad was excited, and Jiri’s girlfriend is cute.

Tuukka Rask was chased from the Bruins net in the third period after Gally made it 5-3 good guys.

And as the season wears on, if Magilla Lucilla doesn’t seriously injure Emelin, I’ll be surprised. Bruins coach Claude Julien, if he has proper balls, should harness this thug. And while he’s at it, bench the despicable Brad Marchand, who at one point shoved his stick between P.K.’s legs.

That’s sounds rude in a couple of ways, doesn’t it?

On second thought, Julien should leave both alone. Their constant brain farts will sink this Bruins team.

A grand night at the Bell, the Canadiens home opener, with the scoring nicely spread around. Gally with two goals and an assist. Max – a goal and two assists. Parenteau with two goals. Pleks, DD, and Emelin all with two assists. And Chucky, Bourque, and Tinordi with an assist each.

Just one small concern, although I’m sure it’ll be ironed out in no time because we’ve learned before to chill out when this happens. Carey Price has allowed 14 goals in his not quite four games played.

Nothing to fret about. Price is starting slow and soon enough will pick up steam. I’m sure about that.

Random Notes:

Shots on goal, Boston 29, Montreal 26.

Next up – Saturday, when Colorado pays a visit.

Summer Notes From Habsville

A number of things happened Habs-wise this summer, the most surprising being I was able to decipher the notes I’d made regarding the things that happened Habs-wise this summer.

Gone are Daniel Briere, Josh Gorges, Brian Gionta, Tomas Vanek, Ryan White, Douglas Murray, George Parros, and anthem singer Charles Prevost Linton.

Francis Bouillon, at this writing, remains stranded on the desert island named Limbo. Douglas Murray’s island is slowly sinking. George Parros’ island is somewhere near the lost continent of  Atlantis.

White now finds himself in Philadelphia where one of his jobs will be to protect captain Claude Giroux from grabbing police officers’ buttocks, and Bouillon’s future seems secure. If he doesn’t find a hockey job, the City of Montreal is ready to step in and make him a fire hydrant.

Auditions are now in process for the anthem singing gig. Unfortunately, management, with a somewhat prickly attitude, has informed me that I’m not allowed to be singer AND stick boy.

Forward P.A. Parenteau, from Colorado in exchange for Briere, is now part of the family, and Gorges and Gionta aren’t, as the two UFAs were picked up by Buffalo, a place Gionta is probably happy about being. Gorges, maybe not as much, considering it’s Buffalo.

Parenteau is 31 and hopefully more effective than Briere, who is on the verge (Oct. 7th) of becoming 37. Gorges’ passion and shot blocking will be missed. Gionta’s captaincy will be replaced in a year or two, and until then, Max, Markov, Pleks and P.K. will serve as assistant captains.

In the spirit of fairness, Markov, with the most seniority, should be the one to accept the Stanley Cup from Mr. Bettman next spring.

Signings this summer involved free  agents Manny Malhotra (1-year, from Carolina), Tom Gilbert (2-years, from Florida), and goaltender Joey MacDonald (1-year, from Calgary). And Jiri Sekac from the KHL Lev Praha squad signed a two-year entry level deal.

Those with new contracts include P.K. Subban, at 9 million a year for 8 years. Apparently there is no truth to the rumour that P.K. has bought the Sun Life Building in downtown Montreal to use as his winter residence, so you can stop thinking about that.

Regulars Andrei Markov (3 years), Dale Weise (2-year extension), Mike Weaver (1 year), Lars Eller (4 years), and coach Michel Therrien (4-year extension), also penned their names on paper.

Chosen in the 2014 Entry draft, 26th overall, was Moscow-born Nikita Scherbak, who looks, speaks, and plays like a young Alex Galchenyuk, who’s a grizzled old guy now.

Assistant coach Gerard Gallant is now the head guy in Florida and replaced by Montreal native Dan Lacroix.

Lacroix helped out behind the Rangers bench last year, and if it was he who advised the despicable Chris Kreider to run Carey Price and then Dustin Tokarski, he should be hung by the thumbs outside a Bell Centre window for several hours, and then be forced to teach our guys (aside from Brendan Gallagher) how to run goalies too.

Player Development guru Patrice Brisebois leaves and replaced by former NHLer Rob Ramage. And Trevor Timmins has had the title “Vice President of Player Personnel” added to his “Director of Amateur Scouting” handle.

Timmins is widely respected, particularly in Northern Ontario where they named a small city after him.

Former Canadiens captain Saku Koivu, an ultra-talented battler if there ever was one, retired after 1124 regular season games played, with his last 5 seasons in Anaheim and 13 years and one lockout season with Montreal before that. Thank you Saku, for all you did for the Montreal Canadiens and the city. Which was plenty.

And finally, Mensa member Brad Marchand mentioned that he dislikes Tomas Plekanec quite a bit. “Anybody who spells “Thomas” without  an “H” is a rotten bastard”, said Brad.

Other things could happen in the days and weeks too. If so, just mentally paste them to this.

Bye Bye Bruins

Don’t poke the bear? Why, what happens?

I found that statement arrogant and I wanted to shove it down the throat of anyone who said it.

How sweet it is. How sweet that the Montreal Canadiens went into Boston and won game seven and the series. Once again the Canadiens prove to be Boston’s biggest headache.

I love that!

How sweet that with a hard-fought 3-1 win, the Habs send Boston fans home unhappy and the Bruins into summer hibernation.

How sweet that Dale Weise got the game’s first goal, that Max Pacioretty scored his second in two nights, and Daniel Briere notched an assist on Weise’s goal and banked a puck off Zdeno Chara’s skate for the insurance marker.

Thank you Zdeno. You ruined any chance of a comeback. With a little help from Johnny Boychuk, who was penalized in the last few minutes for crosschecking Michael Bournival in the face.

Self destruction, and don’t blame the zebras for ruining the party.

It wasn’t easy for the Canadiens though. Not by a country mile. The Bruins spent far too much time in Montreal’s end, pelting 30 shots at Carey Price while just 18 went Tuukka Rask’s way.

The pressure was on, but Price was once again outstanding, and when a goalie allows just one goal in two pressure-packed playoff games, you know he’s zoned in, and now even more so, the sky really is the limit.

I wonder what Don Cherry is doing, now that the bear got poked not quite the way he was thinking. Put away your Bruins cufflinks and ties, Don. And if you dig deep, maybe you can think of  a couple of nice words to say about the Montreal Canadiens next time you’re on TV. Can you bring yourself to do this, or is it simply impossible?

Brad Marchand? Such a despicable piece of work. We know he’s not exactly a Mensa candidate, but showering Price with snow was truly an idiotic move. And his punching, slashing, chopping, and hacking added up to exactly nothing.

And I don’t know yet what tasteless and classless things Milan Lucic said to Dale Weise during the handshake, but whatever it was, I suppose it’s not all that surprising.

But that’s all I want to say about that team. They’re hibernating and we’re moving on to meet the Rangers to decide best in the east. How cool is that?

This series win was all about hard work and digging deep. About plumbers becoming household names and guys believing. It was about not giving up, giving all they had, and we as fans benefit from having such a character team to cheer for.

We savour this, let it sink in for the next few days, and focus on how the boys match up against Henrik Lundqvist and Marty St. Louis and rest of the Blueshirts.

But right now, our team got it done against a very fine Bruins team, and it’s something to be very proud of.





I just can’t say enough about this team right now. Such character throughout. Digging deep, playing with heart and soul, and winning games six and seven

Close Encounters

Mike and Big M

You go to a Canadian Tire in Toronto to buy a table and chairs and you run into one of the greatest players ever, Frank Mahovlich, who was also shopping and who knows a thing or two about playing the Bruins.

That’s what happened to my old buddy Mike Williamson the other day in outdoor patio and accessories. Frank and Mike talked about what a great series it’s been this year along with other things, and then Frank was off to buy his garden tools or whatever it was he went to Canadian Tire for.

Frank knows a thing or two about playing the Bruins. He was a standout in the 1971 Habs-Bruins semi-finals for example when Montreal took out the heavily-favoured Bruins four games to three.

Frank in those ’71 playoffs scored seven of Montreal’s 27 goals against the Bruins and led all players in the playoffs with 27 points to set a Canadiens record.

Twenty-seven points in the playoffs is amazing. P.K. would need 16 more to equal that but if the Canadiens can carry on and P.K. continues to shine, maybe he could sneak up and catch Mahovlich. Wouldn’t that be something?

This is the third time Mike has run into a player while shopping. He also chatted with Darryl Sittler and Eddie Shack at different times. But, like Mike said, it’s better when it’s an ex-Hab like the Big M.

Frank was also wearing a huge mother of a Stanley Cup ring on his finger. But if he wanted, he could wear six after winning four with the Leafs and two with the Canadiens.

I’m now curious to know who the next player Mike’s going to meet while out and about. Chances are it won’t be Brad Marchand at a library.





Photo ‘Ruins

Game 1: Thursday May 1 at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Game 2: Saturday, May 3 at Boston, 12:30 p.m.
Game 3: Tuesday, May 6 at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Game 4: Thursday, May 8 at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Game 5 (if necessary): Saturday, May 10 at Boston, TBD
Game 6 (if necessary): Monday, May 12, at Montreal, 7 p.m.
Game 7 (if necessary): Wednesday, May 14, at Boston, TBD

Bruins 3

Bruins 4

Bruins 1

Bruins 7

Bruins 10

Bruins 5

Bruins 8

Bruins 9

Bruins 2

Bruins 11

Bruins 12

Bruins 14

Boston 12