Tag Archives: Boom Boom Geoffrion

We’ll Take Fifty Please

Richer

I was reading Le Journal de Montreal the other day, or trying to read it. It helps me learn a bit of French. I find the cartoons work well.

In Saturday’s paper was this drawing which I like, and which happens to have a Stephane Richer poster on the wall.

Stephane Richer scored fifty goals for the Canadiens twice – 50 in ’87-88, and then 51 in ’89-90.

It’s been twenty-four years since Montreal had a fifty-goal scorer. Twenty-four years since we had someone who knew how to light the lamp on a regular basis.

We’re not even close to having a guy who puts terror in the hearts, eyes, and groins of opposing defencemen and goalies.

The opposition isn’t the least bit uptight now from our guys who jump over the boards, except for P.K. Subban who sends missiles from the blueline. The team is small, is 29th of 30 teams when it comes to regular-strength goals, and our leading point-getter, P.K. isn’t even a forward and is 64th in the league with 36 points.

Our top goal-scorer, Max Pacioretty, has 21 which isn’t bad, but he won’t come close to fifty. Tomas Plekanec, next in line, has 16 and may or may not reach 25.

We have two superstars in our midst – Subban and Carey Price, who’s a goalie. Although Price has two assists, which ties him with Douglas Murray and Ryan White.

I want a guy at the top, or near the top, in scoring. A guy fans in other rinks buy tickets to see.

He’d be so good, even CBC announcers would say nice things about him.

Fans in the seats would point him out to their sons and daughters. Look, they’d say, there’s Gaston LeBois. He’s the best.

Instead, we have guys who go games without a shot on net. They can’t find the back of the net but they always manage to find their pay cheques.

This isn’t THE Montreal Canadiens. Not even close. The is the Montreal Journal de Montrealers. Featuring the women from the fashion and society pages.

We need a big scorer, and I know it’s easier said than done. But I could care less. We need one. End of story.

Could it be Alex Galchenyuk? Maybe. He’s just turned 20 years old, and we won’t really know what we have in him for a few more years.

And if it’s not him, how many more years before one comes along? Twenty? Forty?

Here’s the Habs who managed to light the lamp 50 or more times:

Stephane Richer – 51 – 1989-90
- 50 – 1987-88
Guy Lafleur – 50 – 1979-80
- 52 – 1978-79
- 60 – 1977-78
- 56 – 1976-77
- 56 -1975 76
-53 – 1974-75
Pierre Larouche – 50 -1979-80
Steve Shutt – 60 – 1976-77
Bernard Geoffrion – 50 – 1960-61
Maurice Richard – 50 – 1944-45

Gaston LeBois – 61 – 2029-30

Name Tags

I’ve always liked this picture, which is in my old scrapbook, even though it’s a little worse for wear. Two fine Habs fans showing off their favourite players the best way they knew how. Good thing their favourite player wasn’t named George Stroumboulopoulos or Ronaldo Konabopopolopolis. It would have to carry on down their legs.

Harvey captured the Norris Trophy seven times between 1954 and 1962, with Johnson winning it for the 1958-59 season. With these guys on the blueline, along with the usual suspects like the Richards, Beliveau, Moore, Geoffrion, Plante etc, it’s no wonder the Canadiens won five straight in the late fifties.

 

Nice Old Set

The title sounds like I’m talking about Sophia Loren.

I have the majority of the 1954-55 Parkhurst set in various conditions ranging from good to excellent, which is a ways down from near mint and mint, but still pretty darn good. The 100 cards were from the Original Six teams, plus some action shots.

This is a nice set to have, considering kids back then didn’t really collect cards, but instead threw them against buildings, playing closest to the wall. They (we) also put them in bicycle spokes and created a nice sound as the wheels turned and cards got destroyed.

Below are the complete Habs, which include, in order, Gerry McNeil, Dickie Moore, Jean Beliveau, Eddie Mazur, Bert Olmstead, Butch Bouchard, Maurice Richard, Boom Boom Geofrrion, John McCormack, Tom Johnson, Calum Mackay, Ken Mosdell, Paul Masnick, Doug Harvey, and Floyd Curry.

A Motivating Factor

Talk about motivation to play well. Blake Geoffrion today signed a one-year, two-way contract with the Habs which will give him $803,250 if he plays for the big club, but just $62,500 if he’s sent to the minors. That’s a difference of $740,750, which is substantial to say the least. Imagine the Boom Boom and Howie memorabilia this would buy.

This is the kind of contract Gomez needs. Maybe he’d scored three or four instead of a lousy two if he had to play scared.

 

 

 

 

A Habs’ Loss, And No Storm Squad

I looked for them during the game and couldn't find them.

It was a night of great saves by both Cam Ward and Peter Budaj, and in the end, it was another Habs unwanted point in a 2-1 Hurricanes shootout win.

It was a game that gave the Canadiens last place overall in the east, third last in the league at this point, and it’s back to what we know best – losing and not scoring, especially on the power play, after a great game the night before against the Tampa Bay Lightning.

Montreal was a tremendously sad 0 for 7 with the man-advantage, the Desharnais line was shut down, and the cameras never once showed the Carolina Hurricane cheerleading Storm Squad, a spectacle I don’t mind seeing as long as it’s not at the Bell Centre. I just enjoy the jiggling and bouncing of the assets.

Peter Budaj and Cam Ward put on a show, foiling players left and right, with a little help the posts from time to time, but the big one was Ward on David Desharnais, when, with a wide open net, Desharnais fired it and Ward got the big paddle out. You’ll see it when you tune in any hockey highlights in the next 24 hours.

Montreal’s only goal came from Blake Geoffrion, his second of the season, when he swooped around the back of the net and found an opening. I’m sure grandpa Boom Boom scored many a goal like this. Boomer wasn’t just a one-trick pony, booming shots from the point on the power play. He was a gifted scorer and although Blake’s was a beauty tonight, I’m sure he’ll never come close to racking ‘em up the way gramps did.

I can’t wait for the misery to end. This was game 81, and mercifully, only Toronto is left, a Saturday night tilt to close off this most embarrassing of seasons.

No wonder I drink.

Random Notes:

I thought Chris Campoli played a fine game, carrying and blocking pucks, and although this guy can have some bad nights, he’s still more effective than Tomas Kaberle.

Shots on goal – Montreal 31, Canes 29

Rene Bourque was…has…did……….never mind.

At one point it became a 4 on 3 Montreal power play, with as much open space as you’ll ever see, and two Canadiens still managed to run into each other.

 

Gill Goes To Music City

Hal Gill has been dealt to the Nashville Predators. Gill, along with a 2013 5th round draft pick, leaves the Habs who now welcome aboard forwards Robert Slaney, a 2nd round pick in 2012, and Blake Geoffrion, son of Danny, grandson of Boom Boom, and great-grandson of Howie Morenz. Talk about a guy with Hab bloodlines.

Gill was a leader with the Habs, a character guy, and will be missed because of this. But he was slower than molasses, and the way Alexei Emelin and Raphael Diaz have found their way on the the blueline, Gill’s time had come. So long, Hal. You’re a good guy.

PRESS RELEASE

MONTREAL (February 17, 2012) – Montreal Canadiens general manager, Pierre Gauthier, announced today the acquisition of forwards Blake Geoffrion and Robert Slaney, as well as a second round draft pick in 2012 from the Nashville Predators, in return for defenseman Hal Gill and a conditional fifth round draft pick in 2013.

The 24-year old Geoffrion played 22 games with the Predators this season. He registered three assists, 29 hits and 17 penalty minutes, playing an average of 10 minutes and 20 seconds per game. In his second year in professional hockey this season, he also played with the AHL Milwaukee Admirals recording nine points, including two goals, in 20 games.

The 6’01′’, 190 lbs left winger has collected 11 points (6 goals, 5 assists) in 42 regular season games in the NHL.  Geoffrion displays a career +1 plus/minus differential. He added two assists in 12 playoff games in 2010-11, along with a +1 plus/minus ratio.

A native of Plantation, Florida, Geoffrion was drafted in the second round, 56th overall by the Predators at the 2006 NHL Entry Draft. He was awarded the Hobey Baker Memorial Award, as the Top U.S. Collegiate Player in 2010.

Slaney, 23, notched one assist in nine games with the AHL’s Milwaukee Admirals, and 18 points (11 goals, 7 assists) in 30 games with the ECHL’s Cincinnati Cyclones this season.

A product of the QMJHL’s Cape Breton Screaming Eagles the 6’02’’, 203 lbs left winger registered eight assists in 52 career games in the AHL. Slaney added 53 points (19 goals, 34 assists) in 113 career games in the ECHL.

The Upper Cove Island, Newfoundland native Slaney signed as a free agent with the Toronto Maple Leafs on April 14, 2009. He was acquired from Toronto by the Predators on July 3, 2011.

“First and foremost, I would like to thank Hal Gill for his contribution to our team over the last three seasons. His leadership and commitment were much appreciated. I wish him the best of luck with his new team. We are also very pleased to have acquired a second round draft selection in 2012 and two young prospects for our organization. We look forward to working together with Blake Geoffrion and Robert Slaney to continue their progression,” said Canadiens’ general manager Pierre Gauthier.

Hal Gill played 53 games this season with the Canadiens registering eight points (1 goal, 7 assists). He recorded 48 hits and 122 blocked shots, playing an average of 16 minutes and 44 seconds per game.

Since joining the NHL, Gill has recorded 179 points (36 goals and 143 helpers) and maintained a +43 plus/minus ratio in 1,047 NHL regular season games.

 

Boomer And The Boys Sing Da Doo Ron Ron

At the bottom of this story, Boom Boom Geoffrion, Marcel Dionne, and Rogie Vachon sing up a storm on the Rene Simard Show. Simard was sort of Canada’s answer to Donny Osmond.

I have no other words to describe this. Except to offer my sympathies to the Crystals and Phil Spector.

Boomer was a bit of a singer in his day, entertaining his teammates whether they wanted him to or not, and he appeared at least once on The Juliette Show, which came on CBC after the hockey game on Saturday night. I remember Juliette. She seemed like somebody’s hot mother, which she probably was.

Boom Boom was a fun-loving guy, loved to laugh, and I’ll bet he had a blast doing this with Dionne and Vachon, although it’s tremendously cheesy. I’m sure he was the leader of the pack, and I’m willing to go out on a limb and say he had the most talent of the three.

Boomer was a great guy by all accounts, and as a kid growing up he was a huge Habs fan. He said many times over the years how much he loved the Rocket, not only as a kid, but also when he finally played alongside his boyhood hero.

Imagine, he ended up playing on the team he worshipped, with the player he had idolized.

Dreams do come true.

When Richard was suspended in 1955 for having a slight disagreement with a linesman, which led to the St. Patrick’s Day Richard Riot, Boom Boom sailed past Rocket in the last few games of the season to win the scoring championship and the Art Ross Trophy. The poor guy was booed by Canadiens fans for denying Rocket the title number 9 had never won, and not only booed, but also received threatening phone calls and his kids were hassled at school. I think it’s ridiculous that fans would want Geoffrion to tank so the Rocket would win. Asking a bit much, I’d say.

Geoffrion wasn’t exactly sure in the beginning about the whole idea of beating the Rocket. He was uneasy about it. But Doug Harvey saw it was bothering him, took him aside, and told him he’d better score when he got the chances or he’d have to answer to him.

The fans got over it.

Here’s the video. You probably know but if you don’t, it’s Marcel Dionne on the left, Boom Boom in the middle, and Rogie Vachon on the right.

Whistle While You Work

Doug Harvey, Jean Beliveau, Dickie Moore, Jacques Plante, and Bernie Geoffrion looking like they’re on the set of “Mad Men.”

They’re all smiles, which could mean a variety of things. They’ve just destroyed the Toronto Maple Leafs, or they’re rolling along in first place, or Toe or Mr. Selke told them how much they were appreciated, or they just got paid.

Maybe they just finished off a few pops in the dressing room!

One thing’s for sure. This is the look of Stanley Cup champions.

 

 

Hey Scrapbookin, Whatcha Got Cookin?

This episode begins with a reply from Sam Pollock after I’d asked the team when I was a kid if I could be stick boy for one game. Good old Sam said if they did it for me they have to do it for others too so I’ll just have to be content to watch and enjoy instead. Give the letter a couple of clicks and make it bigger.

Also, Jean Beliveau does some modeling at Christmas, and a host of other things I hope you like.

And for any of you who may not know, all of my scrapbook posts can be found by going over to “Categories” on the right-hand side and scrolling down to “The Old Scrapbook.”