Tag Archives: Artturi Lehkonen

Sabres Stab Habs

It’s three losses in the Canadiens’ last four games after falling 3-2 in overtime to the visiting Buffalo Sabres.  Or four losses in six if you’re interested.

Yep, the boys are far from smokin’.

They held on to a thin 2-1 lead going into the third period, they were playing well and were on their way to two big points, but they couldn’t nail down the all-important insurance marker.

They couldn’t muster any killer instinct, Buffalo would tie it at 8:07 of the third, and then the Canadiens simply decided to give about 50% instead of the required 110%. It makes my blood boil, considering I always gave at least 160% wherever I worked.

Sometimes 170%. But I digress.

Well, I’m kinda mad. But not at Carey Price, who was terrific throughout and came up with two astonishing saves in the last 20 seconds of the third period to get the boys into overtime and of course that important single point.

Price got them the point, not the guys in front of him. The Sabres were allowed to fire clear shots and move in close far too many times. It’s soft hockey. Doug Harvey would be rolling in his grave. And if Larry Robinson was dead, he would be too.

Sprague Cleghorn would’ve punched Lehner, a ref, Brian Gionta, and most of his own teammates for losing a game they should’ve won, against a much-inferior squad. Toe Blake would’ve torn a strip off them and taken away the beer on the next train trip. John Ferguson would’ve punched a hole in a cement block. But that was a different time of course.

Today’s players check their investments, go to dinner with friends from the other teams, and say “obviously” a lot when interviewed.

Full marks to Sabres goalie Robin Lehner, who absolutely robbed Alex Galchenyuk in overtime with a glove save on a hard shot while being screened. It’s marked for the highlight reels. His save, and Price’s glove on Rasmus Ristalainen, are two for the ages.

But alas, after Lehner’s big stop, Zach Bogosian would light the lamp and win the game and not that I’m the pessimistic type, but I’d say the Canadiens are in a bit of a mid-winter funk right now.

I’ll also say it again, it’s the wives fault and they should be rounded up and sent to Powell River until the season and playoffs come to a close. I’ll find something for them to do.

Random Notes:

Artturi Lehkonen and Philip Danault scored for Montreal, with both goals coming the middle frame.

Next up – Tuesday, when the Calgary Flames come a callin’.

 

 

Habs Burn Leafs

Just when the young and smug Toronto Maple Leafs and their giddy fans thought the team was rockin’ and rollin’ toward new and amazing heights, they came up against the gritty Montreal Canadiens.

Suddenly, all isn’t so fantastic in Leafland, as the visiting Habs, finishing off a seven-game road trip that took them to winter wonderlands like Miami, Tampa, Dallas, Nashville etc, waltzed into Toronto and won 5-3 in solid fashion over the Toronto Kadris.

Alexander Radulov was sensational, as was Carey Price, but for me the real hero was Shea Weber, who pounced and trounced Zach Hyman after the Leaf forward flew into Price and sent him sprawling. Then, as the second period came to an end, Weber once again sought out Hyman and made his point even clearer.

That’s what we want, and it’s what I knew we’d get from Weber when he came over from Nashville. This is is a guy respected by all, he’s a big brother to some and a leader to all, and he needed to bend Hyman’s nose to say it loud and clear in Toronto and around the league that Carey Price is not to be messed with.

The team will protect Price, and the corner was abruptly turned after New Jersey’s Kyle Palmieri ran Price a month ago and Price took matters into his own hands. His teammates were embarrassed and criticized, but sometimes a team in the midst of gelling needs to learn a solid lesson.

And the Canadiens have.

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Three wins in their first three games of January. Last season, the boys won just three in the entire month. I’m proud of these crazy bunch of beautiful bastards. A team held together with band aids, and they won’t break.

Just a tremendous showing in front of smug Leaf fans.

Random Notes

Habs were outshot by the Leafs 36-31, and were 2/5 on the power play (Scherbak and Radulov).

Nikita Scherbak, in his very first NHL game, scored his first NHL goal with just one second left in the first period to give the boys a 3-2 lead.

Max Pacioretty had opened the scoring just 20 seconds into the game, and Artturi Lehkonen added another befor e the Leafs stormed back to tie it.

Radu scored his power play marker in the second frame to widen the gap to 4-2, but the Leafs would soon make it a 4-3 game.

In the third period, Michael McCarron salted it away by bouncing the biscuit off Leafs goaltender Frederik Anderson, who was quite shitty on the night. Anderson is keeping up the fine tradition of mediocre backstopping in Cabbagetown. It goes back many decades.

No sense naming the Montreal injury list. It’s old news.

But if you haven’t heard, it’s Gally, Chucky, DD, Pateryn, Markov, Byron, and Shaw.

Next up – Habs at home on Monday to battle the Washington Capitals, then it’s back on the road to Winnipeg and Minnesota on Wednesday and Thursday. The wives must be lonely. (And if you are, my number is 604-555-1212. Call me.)

Photos – First – the art was done by me in grade two. Second – one of my old ads from crumbling newspapers. Third – My hockey coin collection. I have the other four teams complete as well. Fourth – the iconic Maclean’s magazine cover, with added script created by my friend Ed in Ottawa.

Habs Handle Caps

Old mitts. Maybe older than you.

The Canadiens held on and edged the Washington Capitals 2-1 on Caps ice, and displayed a fine rebound game after their pathetic effort Friday against the San Jose Sharks.

Artturi Lehkonen and Jeff Petry scored for Montreal, and Carey Price made his own personal statement.

After the Canadiens’ great start, especially in October when they racked up eight wins and a shootout loss, each win now makes their chances of making the post season even more secure.

It also means that although they have their down moments, like the Sharks game, or that 10-0 thing in Columbus, once the playoffs start you’ll forget completely about the regular season.

You say you won’t but you will.

And if you look at last year, the year of The Nightmare (also known as The Worst Habs Season Ever), you’ll see that the collapse to end all collapses began in December, when they won the first game of the month, then dropped the next four, won again in the middle of the month, then lost another six, and then won just once more before falling in their final game of December.

Three wins in December and three times in January. And the sky did fall.

But I’m now happy to report that the 2016-17 team has won four times already in December, with six games to go, and they remain top of the heap with Pittsburgh and a couple of other pretenders.

So they’ll make the playoffs (yes they will), we’ll forget about anything else, and then they’ll win the Stanley Cup because everyone will be healthy (Andrei Markov left early tonight) and Brendan Gallagher and Tomas Plekanec will see their luck change and light several lamps as the CH steamrolls everyone in their path..

Oh, you have your doubts? Well you obviously haven’t been talking to Sprague Cleghorn and Didier Pitre like I have.

Habs Dump Devils

A fine game by the Canadien. Yes it was.

The boys handed the visiting New Jersey Devils a 5-2 spanking at the Bell after firing a season-high 48 shots on the Devils net, and getting goals from Philip Danault, Artturi Lehkonen, Max Pacioretty, and a pair from Torrey Mitchell.

My recently lost enthusiasm hasn’t come back yet, though. But I liked all the shots, and I was enthusiastic about seeing Carey Price pound a sprawling Kyle Palmieri several times on the back with his glove after Palmieri forgot to stop as he neared Price.

I was also enthusiastic about the boys crashing the Devils crease a bunch of times as payback. Price is his teammates’ bread and butter, of course. They have to discourage this Palmieri/Kreider type of behaviour. I’d be pissed if they sat back and did nothing.

But about this lack of enthusiasm. Maybe I’m too old now.  Not as old as Kirk Douglas, but old enough to have been second baseman on the Orillia Peewee all-star baseball team before Michel Therrien was born.

And it was during that peewee baseball summer that I smoked my first cigar. I smoked my first cigar before Michel Therrien was born.

C’mon enthusiasm. Get back. Get back to where you once belonged.

 

Radulov To Galchenyuk

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Above, the Joe Louis Arena (the white building) in Detroit, taken a few months ago when I was visiting my old friends Mike and Diana Williamson in the Windsor area.

Yes, the Joe Louis Arena. Where on a Saturday night in late November, Alexander Radulov fed Alex Galchenyuk in overtime, the net bulged, and the Canadiens begin their five-game road trip with a 2-1 win over the Red Wings.

I might as well save the next sentence and just copy and paste it after every Habs win…….. Carey Price saved the day once again.

The Wings opened the scoring in the third period of a slightly dull game, but Brendan Gallagher would soon even things up, and for Habs fans, it wasn’t as dull anymore.

Gally, who hadn’t scored since Oct. 24th when he deflected a Radulov shot on the power play for the game winner against Philadelphia, hopefully now has that great big mother of a piano lifted from his back.

Random Notes:

Shea Weber was penalized in overtime for slashing but Price and the boys held the fort. Soon after, Weber came out of the box and rang one off the post. One of the more exciting moments of the night.

Charles Hudon was out, due to a fractured sternum (breastplate). These young guys. Can’t even play with a lousy fractured sternum. Hell, in my day………..

Replacing Hudon was Arturri Lehtonen, who was absolutely robbed by Wings netminder Petr Mrazek with a glove save that you’ll see for the next several weeks or months on TV.

Detroit outshot Montreal 33-24.

Next up – Tuesday in Anaheim, which means a late night for eastern time zone fans.

Habs Muzzle Coyotes

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Beautiful. Tremendous. Hardworking. Almost flawless.

But enough about me. We’re talkin’ Habs here.

The Canadiens, with Carey Price finally back in the nets after 11 long months, took out the visiting Arizona Coyotes with a convincing 5-2 win at the Bell Centre.

Price faced 29 shots while his buddies fired 43 at Arizona’s net, and with the win the boys now see themselves with a mighty fine three wins and a shootout/point in their first four starts.

Who could ask for more? Especially when the entire team put together a rockin’, sockin’, red light-lighting night that will see the bars in Montreal being some of the happiest places on earth this Thursday night.

Maybe because of his World Cup experience, but Alexei Emelin seems a confident and improved player this year, and the hardrock d-man even bulged the twine with a massive blast from the blueline to open the scoring.

Emelin also crushed several unfortunate Coyotes who crossed his path, he hurts when he hits, always has, and this year with Shea Weber on board, he’s not the only one anymore who can turn bones into powder.

Torrey Mitchell in the second period gave his team a nice 2-0 lead after converting a great pass from Nathan Beaulieu, and at this point I thought to myself how cool it would be if Price could shut the door for the entire night.

But I never said it out loud so don’t blame me that it didn’t happen.

Shea Weber scored his first goal in a Montreal uniform, a missile from the blueline on the power play, and also smashed guys on several occasions, especially in the first two frames. A perfect example of why Jonathan Toews said after The Big Trade that it was great that Shea wasn’t in his Conference anymore.

Alex Galchenyuk finally scored his first of the season to make it 4-0, and which sent Coyotes’ goalie Louis Domingue to the bench and replaced by Justin Peters. Peters would see his team begin to fight back and narrow things to 4-2, but in the third, Artturi Lehkonen’s wrist shot lit the lamp, the score became a tidy 5-2, and the clock struck midnight for the visitors.

Random Notes:

We can complain about the weather and high taxes and hospital food and the price of cheese, but we can’t complain about the number of goals allowed by the Habs. Al Montoya and now Price, along with the boys out front, have allowed just seven goals in the four games to start the season.

And the gang has scored 16 in these four games to boot.

Alexander Radulov continues to be a major threat and is a great addition.

David Desharnais assisted on Emelin’s goal and is one of six guys who now have four points in four games (DD, Weber, Petry, Pacioretty, Gallagher, and Galchenyuk).

Next up – Saturday in Boston. Hopefully they can keep this going.

 

 

 

Habs Handle Sabres In Opener

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It was slightly sloppy and reasonably boring, but it’s October hockey, which is a far cry from deep winter hockey. They’re rusty, like me.

Heck, I quit doing recaps last season with more than a month left to go. But you understand. After the pathetic nosedive by the boys, you’d quit writing recaps too.

They owe us a big turnaround campaign, and it began Thursday night when the Canadiens skated off Buffalo ice with a 4-1 win under their belts.

It’s hard to be overly excited when it’s (a) October hockey, and (b) they won their first nine last year before free falling into the depths of hell, but it’s a new season with a roster makeover, and the new guys in the lineup showed grit and spark and became major factors in this bombing of the Buffalonians.

Al Montoya, in goal for the ailing Carey Price, was as solid as can be and stopped 30 of 31 shots fired at him.

Shea Weber thumped bodies and blasted missiles like we knew he would, although he missed the net several times in dramatic fashion. The big fellow was solid, tough, and imposing, and notched an assist when his wrist shot was deflected by Brendan Gallagher for the all-important third goal of the night for the good guys.

Alex Radulov showed plenty of smarts and composure, something another newcomer, Andrew Shaw, might want to consider.

Shaw batted home his team’s fourth goal of the night, but also received a match penalty at the final buzzer for slew-footing, which is despicable at the best of times, and it’s the kind of brain-dead act we’ll see from this fellow at various times throughout the season.

Shaw can be incredibly valuable, and can also be quite an arse, as we saw when he played for the Hawks. It’s something we need to get used to. If he doesn’t wear the CH we hate his guts, right?

Artturi Lehkonen seemed to have some chemistry with Tomas Plekanec and didn’t look out of place, although having said that, my mind did tend to wander throughout the game and maybe I missed a couple of things.

And young Mikhail Sergachev, only several months removed from being a 17-year old punk kid, looked fine but also at times looked like he might need another year in junior. But he’s a beauty with a great future.

Yes I’m excited about Sergachev, but I was excited about Jacob de la Rose, Jiri Sekac, and Michael Bournival too, so I have to contain myself. But Misha was the best d-man in the Ontario Hockey League last year, so maybe it’s safe to be excited.

Misha is the everyday nickname for Russian guys named Mikhail, so if you want to call Sergachev this, it’s perfectly fine. And while I’m at it, Radulov can be called Sasha, which is the common name for Alexander.

It was the heart of the team who did the most damage, though. Brendan Gallagher would contribute a pair on this night, the opener which was a long shot from the top of the circle that rang in off the post, and his deflection of Weber’s wrist shot for the third Habs goal.

Torrey Mitchell would score his team’s second goal after Paul Byron’s speedy rush created the opportunity.

Random Notes:

The Sabres outshot the Canadiens 31-24, but Al Montoya shut the door. The name Al Montoya sounds to me like a lounge singer with connections to the mob. I’ve always thought that.

Buffalo’s Evander Kane smashed into the end boards after getting tangled up with Alexei Emelin, and was taken to the hospital. Hope he’s okay, even though he can be a bit of a dipshit off the ice.

Next for the boys – Saturday in Ottawa to clash with a natural enemy.

 

 

Fine Finnish Habs Fan

I first started to see Jarno Tauvo’s comments on Hockey Inside/Out, and I’m very grateful to learn that he comes here too.

And when I learned that he did, I contacted him because I was interested in knowing the path he took in becoming a solid Habs fan.

Below is Jarno, from Turku, Finland, who wrote back and explained.

Jarno

“My native language is Finnish, but the lovely woman who lives with me speaks Swedish. So we speak mixed Finn and Swedish at home. Mostly the person who starts to speak first chooses the language (and she speaks a lot).

“It’s quite common here in Turku to speak Swedish too, this is a bilingual city, only 160 kilometers from Stockholm (Sweden), and luckily we have that narrow sea between us.  So most Swedes understand to stay on their side. My father didn’t, he went to study to Sweden in the 60’s, but was wise enough to come back.

“You asked how I became a Habs fan. Well…
It’s not easy to explain, but I’ll try.

“I was born in 1972.
When I was a child, everybody in Finland followed only skiing or ski jumping. At summertime,  long distance runners were our heroes. News from NHL was normally a week old, if there was any at all. I remember reading different hockey books at the library wondering how cool it looked to play hockey in the NHL.

“Ice hockey was (and still is) quite an expensive sport to have as a hobby. I have to admit I was a fortunate one, because my parents could afford to pay my hockey hobby.

“That was the time when every Finnish boy was a huge fan of Jari Kurri and Esa Tikkanen in Edmonton. I talked with my father about hockey and the NHL. He told (lied probably) me that Gretzky wears #99 only in honour to the greatest ever, #9, you know who.  He also told me that Montreal Canadiens are the only real hockey team that has been around almost as long as hockey has existed and it is the reason why there is that game of hockey I like to play and watch. That’s probably the moment when I started to search for information about Habs.

“I was extremely happy when Jyrki Lumme was drafted by Montreal. It was at the time when Finnish television aired only Stanley Cup finals. Almost through the whole 90’s, it was the only the Finals we could see. So I’ve seen the Avalanches, Red Wings and Devils ‘domination. Before the internet I had seen only one Habs’ Final game, vs the Kings.

“I became a real “Hardcore Habs fan” when Saku moved from Turku to Montreal. I’m the same age as the older Kiprusoff brother, Marko, who had a short stint there too. He was almost my childhood neighbour. Those were the days when a Finnish hockey legend Timo Nummelin lived in the same building with our family. He has a son Petteri Nummelin, who has played a lot with Team Finland. Petteri plays still in the Finnish elite league “Liiga” at age of 41.

“Suddenly one cable television company from Sweden started to air NHL in Finland too and I had to purchase their package. The only bad thing was that Detroit and Colorado had too many Swedes, so they showed mostly their games. On a plus side, Toronto had Sundin and they played often against the Habs. Thanks to Sundin, I saw those games and a game here and there.

“One of my biggest emotions in a hockey game was to watch Saku’s comeback game vs. Ottawa. Live. I sat on a couch, eyes full of tears, amazed by the standing ovation the Bell Centre gave to him. Then I was sure that being a fan of the Montreal Canadiens means much more than just supporting a team. It is a worldwide community. At the same time when the Bell Centre was celebrating Saku’s comeback from cancer, I lived the same emotions at home, wiping tears and screaming when Craig Rivet scored and rushed to the bench to hug the captain.

“I’m not sure how I became a fan, but maybe that isn’t so rare not to know? As an example, my hometown has a two hockey teams. TPS and TuTo. TPS is like the Habs in Finland. Finns say about Finnish hockey: Game lasts for 60 minutes and at the end TPS wins. Although the last couple of seasons they have been suffering. Finland is a small country with only a little more than 5 million people here and the NHL-players from TPS include the Koivu brothers, Kiprusoff brothers, Jani Hurme, Jere Lehtinen, Kimmo Timonen (started here as pro) Joni Ortio, Rasmus Ristolainen, etc…

“But still my hometown favourite team is TuTo. I don’t know why. They are not a bad rival, because TuTo plays in second highest level. But it’s small and nice team where everybody knows each other.
It’s cool that I work a little with them too. I’m a photographer and I’ve taken their group photos and commercial photos. My photo studio is also a minor sponsor to them… It’s nice that they play well and are the best team in their league, but still. When Habs win, Habs win. TuTo’s headcoach is Artturi Lehkonen’s dad, Ismo Lehkonen. He kept joking about my Habs’s shirt to me, when I was shooting their group photo.

“Here’s some shots from Turku, Finland. The big and old building is the church which is from 1300 century. The river in the photos is the River Aura, that floats in the middle of Turku. It normally freezes in the winter. I Just noticed I don’t have photos from Turku at the summer.”

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