Tag Archives: Alex Galchenyuk

Big Numbers, Huge Numbers

Alex Galchenyuk scored again on Sunday as his Sarnia Sting edged the Oshawa Generals 3-2, this coming a night after his three-goal showing in Peterborough, and so while I should have been working, instead I used the boss’s computer and calculator and came up this: (with the help of Miss Vicki, who seemed to know what she was doing).

Galchenyuk has 20 goals and 49 points in 28 games, which, if Miss Vicki is correct, means that he’s on track for a 48-goal season, 119 points in total. That’s fine work for a guy who only played two games last year because of a knee injury. And who knows, maybe he’s just getting revved up and could finish with much more.

I gotta tell you. Keeping a watch on Galchenyuk is much more fun than my Gomez watch.

And before I continue down the junior path, it seems that ECHL players, which Gomez is one of right now, earn an average of $500 a week. With Gomez, that’s more like it.

A 130-point season for Galchenyuk would be great. I think we’d all be happy with that. But have a gander at these numbers:

Bobby Smith holds the OHL record for 192 points during the 1977-78 season, and Ernie Godden, playing for the Windsor Spitfires in 1980-81, scored a total of 87 goals! Godden would be chosen 55th overall by the Leafs, but only played five games with Toronto and that was it for the NHL. Maybe because he was small at 5’8 and 160 pounds, that his career screeched to a sudden halt.

In the WHL, Ray Ferraro holds the record for goals with 108, while Rob Brown (remember him?) had 212 points during the 86-87 season with the Kamloops Blazers.

And of course I save the best for last.

In 1983-84, Mario Lemieux managed 133 goals and a total of 282 friggin points.

Bonus stats!

In the 1971-71 season, Guy Lafleur scored just three less than Mario’s record, nailing 130 goals while with the Quebec Remparts. And Sidney Crosby’s best year with Rimouski saw him net 66 goals and 102 assists for 168 points.

 

Galchenyuk Racks ‘Em Up

Our Habs might have the odd overpaid two-goal scorer and a semi-comatose forward, and maybe a defenceman who doesn’t get closer than three feet of the opposition, and of course the injury-prone team with no power play did end up slightly down in the standings last season. Slightly.

But there could be an excellent silver lining.

I’ll borrow a well-used quote from music critic Jon Landau after his witnessing a young Bruce Springsteen in action in 1974, move things around a little, and say, “I have seen the future of the Montreal Canadiens, and its name is Alex Galchenyuk.

I’m craving a true superstar on the team, and I’ll take a chance and speak for several million other fans by saying they want one too. Patrick Roy was the last one. Guy Lafleur was before Patrick. It’s been a long, harsh drought. Not to put much pressure on the young fellow, but that’s the deal. All he has to do is become a big-time superstar like Guy Lafleur. Is it too much to ask?

Fans of every other team might say they want one too. But who cares what fans of other teams want. They’re lucky we let them co-exist with us in everyday life.

Galchenyuk scored three times on Saturday night in leading his Sarnia Sting to a big 5-2 win over the Peterborough Petes, giving our new future star 19 goals and 29 assists for 48 points in 27 games, putting him third in scoring in the Ontario Hockey League behind Niagara IceDogs Ryan Strome (59 points) and Seth Griffith of the London Knights (49 points).

Strome has played three more games than Galchenyuk, and Griffith two more, so be careful guys, he’s breathing down your neck. Maybe by Christmas these two will be chasing him.

Maybe he’ll leave all concerned in the dust.

Maybe he’ll be a great one.

 

Thirteenth?

The Hockey News says Montreal will finish 13th in the East this season. How can that be? Don’t they realize Scott Gomez is on the team?

It’s just so much bullshit anyway. Anything can happen to any team, whether they’re predicted to finish 1st or 15th. Players we least suspect can catch fire. Key guys can go down with injuries. Some teams and players don’t measure up to their potential. Some overachieve. Important trades can be made. A star player can have a bitchy wife. A good faceoff man can get crabs from a groupie.

These predicters don’t know. It’s just a game of guessing. Sports is rife with stories of the underdog coming through, like the ’69 Miracle Mets, or my peewee baseball team.

I think the Habs can at least make the playoffs. Why not? We now have Brandon Prust, Colby Armstrong, and Francis Bouillon.

Oh. Maybe that’s not so much.

But what if Colby Armstrong has a breakout year and scores 40? What if Brandon Prust becomes the the new John Ferguson, scrapping and scoring and becoming a fan favourite? Maybe Francis Bouillon will be a rock on the blueline. What if Alex Galchenyuk makes the team and sets the world on fire? Brian Gionta is raring to go! And yes, so is Scott Gomez. Any day now we should hear his new promise.

What about that, Hockey News?

Thirteenth. Behind Toronto.

Here’s their picks, the bastards.

1. Pittsburgh
2. Boston
3. Washington
4. Rangers
5. Philadelphia
6. Tampa Bay
7. Buffalo
8. Ottawa
9. Carolina
10. Florida
11. New Jersey
12. Toronto
13. MONTREAL
14. Winnipeg
15. Islanders

 

Someone Suggested……

Tonight, while at work and taking a break from giving my usual 155%, I read, on the TSN site I think, someone suggest that Montreal should trade PK Subban to Edmonton, straight up, for Nail Yakupov, the first-overall pick in this year’s entry draft.

The argument is, basically, that PK has way too much of an ego, he’s already been offered $2.75 million a year for two years in which he and his agent said thanks but no thanks, and that he’s going after big money even though he’s still maturing and hasn’t reached elite status yet. And the Oilers really need help on the blueline.

But to trade our PK for an unproven kid yet to play a game in the NHL? Maybe if Bob Gainey was at the helm it might happen. But I don’t think Marc Bergevin would do it in a million years. At least I don’t think he would.

On the other hand, having both Yakupov and Galchenyuk in the lineup might create some serious fire-wagon hockey.

Anyway, we’re all armchair quarterbacks and this fellow just threw the Subban/Yakupov thing out there for the hell of it. But it got me thinking all the way home from work.

I just wish PK would hurry up and sign and we move on to other stuff. Like lockouts and the commissioner and all that.

 

 

 

Galchenyuk’s First Habs Contract

From Canadiens.com

PRESS RELEASE

MONTREAL – Montreal Canadiens general manager Marc Bergevin announced Monday the signing of its 2012 NHL Entry Draft first round pick Alex Galchenyuk to a three-year contract (2012-13 to 2014-15). As per club policy, financial terms of the agreement were not disclosed.

Galchenyuk, 18, only took part in two regular season games with the OHL Sarnia Sting in 2011-12. The 6’1’’, 195 lbs forward missed the majority of the season due to a knee injury. In the playoffs, Galchenyuk registered four points (2 goals, 2 assists), playing in all six contests.

In his first junior season in 2010-11, Galchenyuk ranked third in scoring with the Sting, tied for first in assists, with a total of 83 points (31 goals, 52 assists) in 68 regular season games. He also served 52 penalty minutes.

A native of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Galchenyuk was the Canadiens’ first round selection, third overall at the 2012 NHL Entry Draft.

 

Nokelainen Signs For A Year

Centre Petteri Nokelainen, along with defenceman Brendon Nash, has signed a one-year deal with the Habs, and this now sees the team with a whack of centremen – David Desharnais, Tomas Plekanec, Lars Eller, Nokelainen, Ryan White, Blake Geoffrion, Alex Galchenyuk, who may or may not crack the lineup this year, and of course, the one and only Scott Gomez.

Maybe a nice juicy trade is in the wind. Or maybe the team just loves depth down the middle. Regardless, Gomez should start packing his wallet and electric head razor.

Nash injured his shoulder in training camp last year and missed the entire season, but will see lots of ice time in Hamilton next season. I love his size – 6’3, 214 lbs, and we could see him earn a regular spot with the big club down the road after Tomas Kaberle is traded to Toronto for a vintage CHUM Chart.

 

 

Name-Looking

I guess I was a little surprised by a couple of players who received qualifying offers from the Canadiens. You may not agree with me, but that’s great. I didn’t agree with George Costanza when he ate a chocolate bar with a knife and fork.

I was slightly surprised that Blake Geoffrion was given an offer. Blake wasn’t great by a long shot. He worked hard enough I guess, and is a nice skater, but the offence just wasn’t there, managing two goals and no assists in 13 games. Blake’s grandpa was one of my favourite Habs when I was a kid, and I wanted so much more from the grandson.

But if he accepts the offer and stays, maybe he can pick it up a big notch.

Andreas Engqvist is another who hasn’t dazzled. Fifteen games over two season, with points tallying at 0-0-0. But he was given an offer.

Brad Staubitz is a UFA and his name hasn’t seemed to come up much lately, so I’m assuming there’s still a chance he could be Hab next season. I like teams that are tough, you probably do too, and Montreal wasn’t tough until Staubitz came along and gave Ryan White a hand in that honourable department. Staubitz proved more than willing to pound it out. The opposite of Georges Laraque.

With Staubitz and White being feisty, the Canadiens have that extra dimension we’ve been missing, thanks to previous management miscues.

Michael Blunden wasn’t given an offer, and when I think back on how Blunden played, I see a good-sized player who got his nose dirty from time to time, who crashed the net and got involved, but scored only when certain planets aligned. Just twice in 39 games. Blunden is a right winger, as is Staubitz, so is Staubitz sticking?

I’m not trying to be an expert, and maybe I’m missing certain technicalities that I’m not aware of, but what I know is, the Canadiens have to pull up their socks like they’ve never been pulled up before, so the decisons to keep some and let others go are key decisions. Onwards and upwards. The team found themselves in the dumpster last season, and now it’s time for them to climb out, wipe themselves off, and go to work to make sure such disaster never occurs again. At least not in my lifetime.

That sound a little selfish. Not in my lifetime. Yes I care about future Habs fans who will want Cups long after I’m gone. I can see these future fans now, watching on their 100 inch 3-D televisons while robots brings them beer, the sight of grizzled 40-year old Alex Galchenyuk Jr., son of legendary Hall of Famer Alex Galchenyuk, hoisting the Cup for the 7th time in his illustrious career. The tradition continues.

 

 

 

It’s Galchenyuk!

I haven’t been this excited about an entry draft in a long time. We know what this can mean for the club. A club that desperately needs a young star and game-breaker. Here’s hoping we got one.

Alex Galchenyuk’s named was called by Trevor Timmins, and add this to the Habs’ lineup – a highly-skilled, 6’2 centreman with all kinds of charisma, who plays a complete team game according to Craig Button, and who also has a good-looking mother and girlfriend.

Welcome to Montreal, Alex. Isn’t it a great thing that Andrei Kostitsyn and his brother aren’t there to lead him astray. And hopefully it’s sooner than later when he dons the CH and begins to set the world on fire. Maybe he could centre another bright light – Brendan Gallagher.

I talked about this guy the other day Going For Galchenyuk and I don’t want to repeat myself now. And I don’t want to get all warm and fuzzy about this pick, but I’ll say I’m very excited to say the least.  Number 3 picks don’t come along that often, unless you’re really lousy every year, and to get a quality, world-class, big centreman makes me all warm and fuzzy anyway.

 

 

 

Going For Galchenyuk

It was an impressive bunch indeed who took part in the recent NHL Combine, a 100 or more young physical specimens lifting and jumping and squeezing in front of an audience of NHL bigshots who studied these young fellows like men ogling strippers from the front seats of a strip club.

These young guys, strong, quick, and with great hair, are ready to make their mark in the big leagues, and watching them is a reminder how things have changed in pro sports with big contracts on the line. Long gone are the days of whipping into shape two weeks before the season opener. Gone are the days of the chubby and out-of-shape. Rest in peace, Gump Worsley.

With Montreal choosing third on Friday’s Entry Draft, it was interesting to see these kids and hear them talk and see what they can bring to the table. Do the Habs need a great young defenceman such as Ryan Murray, Mathew Dumba, or Morgan Rielly, or is a flashy forward like Mikhail Grigorenko or Alex Galchenyuk the answer? For me, from watching the Combines, I’m hoping it’s Galchenyuk who puts on the CH in four days.

Galchenyuk not only impressed at the Combines with his jumping and lifting, but also with his personality. This is is a kid with all kinds of charisma, and the fans, media, and ladies would love him. If Montreal is going to have a great young superstar, it’s terrific that he’s interesting and doesn’t come off as a cardboard talking head.

Most importantly, of course, is his talent, and from all accounts, this guy has plenty. He’s a big 6’2, 185 lb. package of speed and skill, notching 83 points in 68 games as a 16-year old with the Sarnia Sting of the Ontario Hockey League. The following season he played only two regular season games and six playoff contests because of a knee injury, but that hasn’t seemed to bother scouts and general managers. He makes them drool even without playing.

Galchenyuk is also a bit of a curiosity. He’s American-born, from Milwaukee, his dad was a minor league hockey player, but the family returned to Minsk when Alex was a toddler. The family would come back to the U.S. when the young fellow was 15 so he could play Midget AAA for the Chicago Young Americans, where he sparkled, and a year later he was drafted by the Sarnia Sting.

Galchenyuk speaks English with a light Russian accent, and is a dual citizen, holding both American and Russian passports. He has said that when it comes time to play for his country, it would be the U.S., which should put to rest any concerns about the kid bolting to the KHL. That and the fact that he’s spent his formative teen years in North America honing his craft.

Galchenyuk apparently has what it takes to be a star in the NHL, and what better place to shine than in Montreal? In interviews he’s showed he’s not nervous in front of a microphone, he believes in himself, and seems a rare breath of fresh air. He’s poised and skilled and you would have to think there would be an opening for him in the near future when you consider the Habs’ centremen currently consists of David Desharnais, Tomas Plekanec, Lars Eller, Ryan White, and yes, Scott Gomez. Surely he’d find a spot in there somewhere. And it’s just another in several dozen reasons to send Gomez packing.

Of course, all this is wasted two-fingered typing if the young fellow goes second, after Nail Yakupov, or fourth, which is the Islanders’ pick. I’m just saying he’d be a nice pick for the Habs, and I’m hoping it happens.