Category Archives: Montreal Canadiens

Habs Muzzle Coyotes


Beautiful. Tremendous. Hardworking. Almost flawless.

But enough about me. We’re talkin’ Habs here.

The Canadiens, with Carey Price finally back in the nets after 11 long months, took out the visiting Arizona Coyotes with a convincing 5-2 win at the Bell Centre.

Price faced 29 shots while his buddies fired 43 at Arizona’s net, and with the win the boys now see themselves with a mighty fine three wins and a shootout/point in their first four starts.

Who could ask for more? Especially when the entire team put together a rockin’, sockin’, red light-lighting night that will see the bars in Montreal being some of the happiest places on earth this Thursday night.

Maybe because of his World Cup experience, but Alexei Emelin seems a confident and improved player this year, and the hardrock d-man even bulged the twine with a massive blast from the blueline to open the scoring.

Emelin also crushed several unfortunate Coyotes who crossed his path, he hurts when he hits, always has, and this year with Shea Weber on board, he’s not the only one anymore who can turn bones into powder.

Torrey Mitchell in the second period gave his team a nice 2-0 lead after converting a great pass from Nathan Beaulieu, and at this point I thought to myself how cool it would be if Price could shut the door for the entire night.

But I never said it out loud so don’t blame me that it didn’t happen.

Shea Weber scored his first goal in a Montreal uniform, a missile from the blueline on the power play, and also smashed guys on several occasions, especially in the first two frames. A perfect example of why Jonathan Toews said after The Big Trade that it was great that Shea wasn’t in his Conference anymore.

Alex Galchenyuk finally scored his first of the season to make it 4-0, and which sent Coyotes’ goalie Louis Domingue to the bench and replaced by Justin Peters. Peters would see his team begin to fight back and narrow things to 4-2, but in the third, Artturi Lehkonen’s wrist shot lit the lamp, the score became a tidy 5-2, and the clock struck midnight for the visitors.

Random Notes:

We can complain about the weather and high taxes and hospital food and the price of cheese, but we can’t complain about the number of goals allowed by the Habs. Al Montoya and now Price, along with the boys out front, have allowed just seven goals in the four games to start the season.

And the gang has scored 16 in these four games to boot.

Alexander Radulov continues to be a major threat and is a great addition.

David Desharnais assisted on Emelin’s goal and is one of six guys who now have four points in four games (DD, Weber, Petry, Pacioretty, Gallagher, and Galchenyuk).

Next up – Saturday in Boston. Hopefully they can keep this going.




Habs Pluck Penguins


Two goals from David Desharnais, an awakening from Captain Max, and a well-deserved shutout for Al Montoya, and the Canadiens rebound from a dismal outing in Ottawa to finish off the Crosby-less Pittsburgh Penguins 4-0 in their home opener at the Bell Centre.

Definitely better than a few nights ago, and it began with a fired up Max Pacioretty opening the scoring just 23 seconds into the contest. Max was alive on this night, like a young DK at parties when someone would put Led Zeppelin 1 on the turntable.

But although the team played well overall, in particular the top line of Pacioretty, Galchenyuk, and Gallagher, it was Montoya who was truly exceptional once again, and who shut the door when the door needed shutting.

Montoya stopped 36 shots, it was never easy throughout, and has now allowed just five goals in his three games for the good guys. Carey Price is still recovering from the flu, and Big Al is doing the job in a big way.

A couple of goals from Desharnais will see DD’s critics forgive him for a night or two, and it was sensational to see the little guy come through, especially after his puck fanning in the shootout in Ottawa.

Alexander Radulov scored his team’s third marker, one which saw him take a pass from Galchenyuk, skate the length of the ice, swoop across, and bury the puck past Marc-Andre Fleury.

This beauty of a goal, on the power play, demonstrated the kind of skill this guy has, and the team is far better with him on board.

All in all a fine, if not spectacular, showing from the Canadiens, on a night that began with a gorgeous pre-game ceremony to open the 2016-17 season at the Bell Centre, concluding with former coach Jacques Demers passing the torch to Captain Max.

Demers coached a bit more than three seasons in Montreal, and was behind the bench for the Canadiens’ last Stanley Cup win in 1993. He’s in a wheelchair now after suffering a stroke earlier this year.

Random Notes:

Montoya was given an assist on Radulov’s goal, and the point now sees him tied with Tomas Plekanec.

The power play was 1/6.

Jeff Petry’s cross ice pass to DD late in the third to make it a 4-0 game was a thing of beauty.

Young buck Mikhail Sergachev saw less ice time in the second and third periods, to the chagrin, I guess, of his folks and sister who had flown in from Russia. But guaranteed, as Misha’s career unfolds over the years, mom, pop, and sis will have plenty to cheer about.

Next up – Thursday, when the Arizona Coyotes pay a visit.




Canadiens Get A Point


Never mind that the Canadiens somehow came back from a 2-0 deficit to take the lead in the final frame.

Forget that the Ottawa Senators then tied the game with just 2:33 left.

Don’t even think about the up and down, tense 3-on-3 in overtime which didn’t solve a thing.

And try to hide the pain from the face palm you planted on yourself after David Desharnais completely fanned in the shootout which gave the enemy the win.

They didn’t play well, but it won’t do us any good to dwell. We could end up angry and bitter like Donald Trump if we dwell.

Ottawa 4, Montreal 3.

We care, us Habs fans, and we definitely can’t go through major misery like last year. And although the gang squeaked out a point, it was a lousy point that also ended in embarrassing fashion.

I hope the sports networks feel our pain and DD’s frustration, and not show the shootout fanning.

And because most of the boys were lousy for three quarters of this game in Ottawa, it stings a bit more than usual to see them play like they’d gone in back in time to the previous year. We made it, we have scars, and we don’t need to be reminded.

Of course it’s only game two, with another 80 to go, but it doesn’t matter how many games because we have big expectations, and we’ve been waiting all summer for a new dawn. And in this game two, the new dawn was dark and downright miserable, and showed there’s a lot of sorting out to do before visions of going deep into the playoffs next spring dance in our heads.

Thank goodness for Al Montoya, in nets once again for Carey Price, who might have the flu. That’s what they say about our star goalie anyway.

Montoya had 38 pucks fired at him and was steady, while the shaky team in front of him managed just 24 on Sens goalie Craig Anderson. The Canadiens first period was sloppy, disorganized, and downright pathetic, as was much of the second. And although they clawed back and made a game of it, overall it was reasonably sad, but at least there’s a point racked up.

Come to think of it, we don’t want them to win every game out of the gate because that’s what they did last year in their first nine. So that’s sort of a positive, isn’t it?

It leaves a sour taste, though. Even though it’s only game two.

Random Notes:

Jeff Petry, back in the lineup, scored a pair, while Habs rookie Artturi Lehkonen banged one in that tied things at two apiece, with the goal being his first in the bigs.

Habs biggest few minutes of the night? When the score was even at two, the Canadiens killed almost a full two minutes with both Paul Byron and Max Pacioretty in the box.

Next up, Tuesday, when the Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins visit Montreal for the Habs home opener. Will Price be in nets? Who knows. Maybe if he takes enough cod liver oil.

New guy watch –

There were moments when Shea Weber, especially on the power play, blasted a handful of scary shots at the Sens net. But he often missed, and he didn’t score.

Alexander (Sasha) Radulov was quite a force, worked hard, and was one of the better players for his team.

Andrew Shaw wasn’t a factor, and Mikhail (Misha) Sergachev was in the press box.

Old guy watch –

None of them were much good.




Habs Handle Sabres In Opener


It was slightly sloppy and reasonably boring, but it’s October hockey, which is a far cry from deep winter hockey. They’re rusty, like me.

Heck, I quit doing recaps last season with more than a month left to go. But you understand. After the pathetic nosedive by the boys, you’d quit writing recaps too.

They owe us a big turnaround campaign, and it began Thursday night when the Canadiens skated off Buffalo ice with a 4-1 win under their belts.

It’s hard to be overly excited when it’s (a) October hockey, and (b) they won their first nine last year before free falling into the depths of hell, but it’s a new season with a roster makeover, and the new guys in the lineup showed grit and spark and became major factors in this bombing of the Buffalonians.

Al Montoya, in goal for the ailing Carey Price, was as solid as can be and stopped 30 of 31 shots fired at him.

Shea Weber thumped bodies and blasted missiles like we knew he would, although he missed the net several times in dramatic fashion. The big fellow was solid, tough, and imposing, and notched an assist when his wrist shot was deflected by Brendan Gallagher for the all-important third goal of the night for the good guys.

Alex Radulov showed plenty of smarts and composure, something another newcomer, Andrew Shaw, might want to consider.

Shaw batted home his team’s fourth goal of the night, but also received a match penalty at the final buzzer for slew-footing, which is despicable at the best of times, and it’s the kind of brain-dead act we’ll see from this fellow at various times throughout the season.

Shaw can be incredibly valuable, and can also be quite an arse, as we saw when he played for the Hawks. It’s something we need to get used to. If he doesn’t wear the CH we hate his guts, right?

Artturi Lehkonen seemed to have some chemistry with Tomas Plekanec and didn’t look out of place, although having said that, my mind did tend to wander throughout the game and maybe I missed a couple of things.

And young Mikhail Sergachev, only several months removed from being a 17-year old punk kid, looked fine but also at times looked like he might need another year in junior. But he’s a beauty with a great future.

Yes I’m excited about Sergachev, but I was excited about Jacob de la Rose, Jiri Sekac, and Michael Bournival too, so I have to contain myself. But Misha was the best d-man in the Ontario Hockey League last year, so maybe it’s safe to be excited.

Misha is the everyday nickname for Russian guys named Mikhail, so if you want to call Sergachev this, it’s perfectly fine. And while I’m at it, Radulov can be called Sasha, which is the common name for Alexander.

It was the heart of the team who did the most damage, though. Brendan Gallagher would contribute a pair on this night, the opener which was a long shot from the top of the circle that rang in off the post, and his deflection of Weber’s wrist shot for the third Habs goal.

Torrey Mitchell would score his team’s second goal after Paul Byron’s speedy rush created the opportunity.

Random Notes:

The Sabres outshot the Canadiens 31-24, but Al Montoya shut the door. The name Al Montoya sounds to me like a lounge singer with connections to the mob. I’ve always thought that.

Buffalo’s Evander Kane smashed into the end boards after getting tangled up with Alexei Emelin, and was taken to the hospital. Hope he’s okay, even though he can be a bit of a dipshit off the ice.

Next for the boys – Saturday in Ottawa to clash with a natural enemy.



Houses Of The Holy

Presenting the boyhood homes of four of the greatest players of all time.

All four photos were taken by yours truly. Not that I’m bragging or anything.

Below, the house in Bordeaux, Quebec, just north of Montreal, where Onesime and Alice Richard moved to from the Gaspe area when Onesime took a job in the big city as a CPR machinist. This is where son Maurice grew up with brother Henri and six other siblings.

When Maurice was older his dad got him a job in his machine shop for $20 a week.


Bobby Orr’s place in Parry Sound, across the street from the Seguin River where young Bobby learned to play the game better than anyone else, except for maybe the fourth player on this page.

This house is only a couple of hundred feet from Parry Sound’s main drag, but I’m guessing he didn’t hang out there looking for trouble, like I did in my home town.


Wayne Gretzky’s pad on Varadi Avenue in Brantford. A fine house on a nice tree-lined street. Bicycles and a little hockey net sit in the driveway, probably for various grandkids visiting Walter.


And finally, Elmer Ave. in Orillia, where the smallish yet shifty Dennis Kane grew up. This is a guy who, while playing for Byers Bulldozers midget all-stars, had his shot clocked at an incredible 29 mph. And aside from seven or eight others, was the fastest skater on the team.

It’s a shame that scouts were either drunk or weren’t paying attention when Kane was playing.  It’s a shame that he was too smalI with shitty muscles. It’s a shame his shot sucked. It’s a shame that the wild and crazy 1960s came along and he got sidetracked. It’s a shame that he had a hard time focusing and would sometimes sing Beatles songs under his breath while carrying the puck down the wing.

There are several other fine excuses as well.


Wanna Take You Higher


As you probably know, PK is selling his condo on Montreal’s Sherbrooke St. for 1.4 million bucks, with the new buyer also needing $23,000 a year for condo fees.

Nice place. Nice street. PK’s TV is too high.

If PK wasn’t popular with his teammates, it’s probably because of the TV.

“Hey guys, wanna come over and watch the Super Bowl at my place?”

“Uh, no thanks PK.”

“Hey guys, wanna come over to my place and play video games?”

“Uh, no thanks PK.”

So it went. More and more, PK felt slighted and gradually grew apart from his teammates who always wanted to watch TV elsewhere.

And no, PK, when your coaches told you to keep your head up, they didn’t mean while watching TV.

Beatles, Habs, And Leafs


On August 17th, 1966, the Beatles played two shows at Toronto’s Maple Leaf Gardens.

I was at the afternoon concert, and I’m pretty darn proud of it.

In the summer of ’66 I was 15 and had a summer job as a highway construction slave labourer, but the boss let me go early and I went down to Toronto from Orillia with a disc jockey my sister worked with at the local radio station. She had got word to me just that morning that the DJ was going and asked if I would like to go with him.

I didn’t have a ticket, but believe it or not, they were still available when I showed up at the Gardens, and I got a $5.50 ticket in the very last row on the floor.

It was madness, of course. There were about six bands in the lineup, including the Ronettes, the Cyrkle and Bobby Hebb, and the Beatles played for about 40 minutes with girls screaming and fainting and carrying on.

That fall, hockey season began, and the next spring, the Toronto Maple Leafs beat the Habs in six games to win their last Stanley Cup.

The Leafs were an old team with guys like Terry Sawchuk, Johnny Bower, Red Kelly, and Allan Stanley, but Montreal wasn’t that young either. Henri Richard was 30, John Ferguson 27, Claude Provost was 32, Dick Duff 30, Ted Harris 30, Jean-Guy Talbot was 34, Jean Beliveau was 35, and the goalies, Gump Worsley and Charlie Hodge, were 37 and 33 respectively.

Of course, Montreal also had kiddies. Yvan Cournoyer was all of 22. Claude Larose was 23, Jacques Laperriere 24, and Serge Savard and Carol Vadnais were just 20.

John and Ringo were 26, Paul 24, and George 23.

The Habs and Beatles remain in the hearts of millions.

The Leafs continue to suck.

Reusch Checks Out The Lineup


A big and hearty thanks to Bill for sending Ron Reusch’s look at how the Canadiens stack up this year by position.

It was something I had kinda thought about doing, but you know how lazy I am. And Mr. Reusch does a way better job anyway.

Here’s Ron’s excellent look at the 2016-17 Montreal Canadiens so far – The Reusch Blog

You be the judge on whether or not you feel this is a team that can make a serious dent.

And by the way, the much-respected Reusch, who’s been covering Montreal sports since the 1960s, somehow manages to put out smart and sharp posts on a regular basis and his blog is for sure worth a hard look.

Borrowed from his website is a little bit about this fine fellow.

“Ron Reusch covered sports both nationally and internationally over five decades. (1960s through 2010). Based in Montreal, Ron worked on the English language play-by-play broadcasts of the NHL’s Montreal Canadiens and NL’s Montreal Expos.

As a member of the CTV Television Network, Ron covered a variety of including the 1980, 1984, 1988 and 1994 Winter Olympic Games and the 1976, 1984 and 1992 Summer Olympic Games. He also did play-by-play for CTV’s coverage of the first three Canada Cup hockey tournaments (1976, 1981 and 1984) and served as color commentator to Dan Kelly’s play-by-play for the NHL’s 1984–85 and 1985–86 seasons on CTV plus the 1987 Canada Cup. Other CTV assignments included live broadcasts of the Indianapolis 500 (6 times), and the Canadian Grand Prix.

Reusch’s broadcast career started in the B.C. Interior as a broadcaster for the Kamloops Chiefs of the Okanagan Senior Hockey League and then with the Kitchener-Waterloo Beavers of the Eastern Professional Hockey League. Reusch moved to Europe in 1962, where, among other things, he covered the 1964 and 1968 Winter Olympics for American Broadcaster CBS Radio. Reusch returned to Canada and Montreal in 1969 where he began a 39 year association with the Montreal CTV affiliate CFCF. For twenty years he was CFCF Sports Director.”


Radulov Enters Habs Universe


Alexander Radulov is a new Montreal Canadien, for a year at least, which means I think we should hardly ever think about the jerk he once was and concentrate on the fact that he might be a great guy now.

Most importantly, this is a skilled forward, a top six guy like we knew the Canadiens needed, and so a big hole has been filled, adding to my ongoing optimism that the team is now bigger, tougher, and more talented.

I hope that some of the boys from BC, like Carey Price, Brendan Gallagher, and Shea Weber, will find it within themselves to bring the Stanley Cup to Powell River next summer.

Radulov, who’ll be 30 on July 5th, made his millions these past few years in the KHL with Ufa Salavat Yulayev and CSKA Moscow. He also certainly knows North America, where his #22 sweater is retired in Quebec after starring for the Remports, scoring 61 goals and 91 assists in just 62 games back in 2005-06, his second and last season with the QMJHL club.

And of course with the Nashville Predators, where not only did he collect 102 points in 154 games, but he also earned a well-deserved spoiled shithead reputation.

Radulov dishonored his Preds contract to bolt to the KHL, and also decided to party with teammate Andrei Kostitsyn until 5 am at a bar in Phoenix, just before game two of their playoff series with the Coyotes in 2012. Who knows what else he did?

But we forget these things now because he’s a Montreal Canadien. Maybe not a Jean Beliveau-type Montreal Canadien, but hopefully a guy who can really make an impact up front.

It’s a new chapter for Radulov, and it’ll be up to him to show that not only is he a great player, but a great guy as well.