Category Archives: Chicago Blackhawks

More To The Roy And Brian Spencer Story


A new email adds greatly to an old story.

In 2008 I wrote about former NHLer Brian Spencer and the tragic events surrounding his dad when CBC decided to air a Vancouver-Oakland game instead of the Leafs and Chicago, which was Brian’s first NHL game.

Brian’s dad, Roy, furious at not being able to see his son in this huge moment in time, decided to bring a rifle to the local TV station, where he would be gunned down by the RCMP.

You can see the full story here – The Sad Story of Roy Spencer and his son Brian.

Today I received an email from a woman named Carole Fawcett who was working at the TV station when Roy Spencer burst in, and I appreciate very much her taking the time to describe those horrific events.

Here’s her email:


I was at the actual event in Prince George, where I worked for CKPG Radio and Television. Just wanted to clarify a few details about the Roy Spencer incident.
He had actually been calling the station all day asking where the game was going to be showed. He was very abrasive and rude I remember being told. He came to the station that night, and once in the door, lunged toward me (I was at the reception desk), wrenched the phone from my hands, banging it against my face in the process. Then he went further into the station. Fast forward to the TV studio where he had us all lined up with his gun pointed toward us and told the TV Switcher to shut down the TV which he did – so all people watching in Prince George would have had their TV’s go black. He told us he had killed (said he was a commando in the war) and would do so again and that we were NOT to put the TV back on the air. He threatened one of the staff members and then subsequently all of us. Unbeknownst to him, Fiori D’Andrea had managed to call the police before he got to the television studio. So, when he went outdoors, the RCMP said – “Halt – or we will shoot”……………and he ended up wounding three RCMP officers. He was killed in the process. He was suffering from serious mental health issues…………………..and his ability to be rational was long gone.

Of course in those days there was no help for staff and we were expected to be back at work the next day.

Just thought you may want some details from someone who was there.

Carole Fawcett, MPCC, CHt
Master Practitioner in Clinical Counselling
Clinical Hypnotherapist

Tight Loss To Preds


It was tight and it could’ve been. But in the end it wasn’t.

Canadiens lose 2-1 to the Nashville Predators, with the game going to a shootout before being decided, and although the Habs grab a point, it’s just another big nail in the Molson wallet.

Nashville scored 3:16 into the first, while Brendan Gallagher replied late in the same frame, at 18:43, and that was it until the shootout.

Tighter than my great-grandmother’s corset. Tighter than a camel’s arse in a sandstorm, as the lamps remained unlit until Nashville’s Craig Smith did his job in the shootout after Montreal’s Sven Andrighetto, Alex Galchenyuk, and Max Pacioretty didn’t.

And thus, the win streak stops at one game. And it’s only the number one team in the league, the Washington Capitals, sitting high and mighty with 92 points, (11 ahead of 2nd place Chicago), on deck Wednesday.

Canadiens have 61 points, so you see the problem.

Random Notes:

Canadiens were outshot 30-29 by the Preds, but midway through the first they were down 6-1 in shots, so they did manage to regroup and make a game of it. Which is better than being comatose throughout.

Dale Weise, who might be changing his address soon, was listed as having the flu.

Mike Condon was in nets again, after backstopping his team to a win on Friday against Philly.

After Wednesday in Washington, the team then plays host to those nutty Toronto Maple Leafs on Saturday.

Two big games. Sort of.




I Think It’s Good Anyway

Once again, for your possible reading enjoyment, some drawings from my grade two exercise book done at West Ward Public School in Orillia, and which I’ve managed to hold on to all these years.

Yes, some of you have seen some of this before, but I’ve added more this time, so that’s good right?

And as another added bonus, I include a photo of West Ward school in the process of burning to the ground in 1968.

But first things first, my art from grade two, lots of it, and which includes some Habs, a portrait of my teacher Mrs. Williams, along with Elvis Presley, which I spelled ‘Elive Prisie’.

If all this isn’t enticing, I don’t know what is.





















West Ward



It Doesn’t Matter


Canadiens lose 5-2 to a real team, the Chicago Blackhawks, and it doesn’t matter.

It doesn’t matter how many goals they scored, or who the referees were, or what the announcers said or didn’t say. It doesn’t matter how they did on the power or how many shots they got overall, or who played what minutes.

It doesn’t matter that they’ve lost 17 of 22 games.

It doesn’t matter who was in goal, or who scored the two goals, or what mistakes were made, or if they looked good for a minute or two, or if they took bad penalties or not. And it doesn’t matter about the coach and GM and possible trades and making or not making the playoffs.

It doesn’t matter.



Another Night, Another….

keystone cops

The Canadiens dominated the St. Louis Blues and still lost, this time 4-3 in overtime, and we watch slightly stunned as the team that once led all teams gradually fades into oblivion.

It’s fine that they showed fire and were involved in several scrums and looked like they’re a truly fed up and pissed off group. And it’s fine that they outshot the Blues 49-22.

It’s not so fine that Mike Condon in the third period misplayed the puck behind the net and the Blues tied things up, just a few dozen seconds after Tomas Plekanec, who hadn’t scored since the invention of the turtleneck, finally found the back of the net.

And it’s not fine either that in overtime, Andrei Markov lost the puck and the Blues moved in on Condon and capitalized in gut-wrenching fashion.

The good ship Habs takes on even more water.

Random Notes:

It’s also not fine that they went 1/7 on the power play. Although it’s good that PK, with his third of the season, was the marksman with the man advantage.

The Canadiens’ 49 shots is a season-high, for what it’s worth.

They hold on to the final wild card spot by the skin of their teeth, with five teams breathing down their neck and ready to pounce.

Alexei Emelin crushed Paul Stastny with a clean, bone-rattling check that made my heart soar. I’ve missed the soaring heart, so thanks Alexei.

Max, with his 18th, gave his team a brief 2-1 lead in the second before the Blues tied it a minute later.

Sunday in Chicago.





No Excuses, But That Goalie……

It's a Wonderful..

The Canadiens, in the second and third periods at least, were in it to win it.

Of course they lost, but that’s beside the point.

Montreal showed fire and pride on Thursday night against the talented Chicago Blackhawks, but it was Corey Crawford who saved the day for the visitors, and the good guys fall 2-1.

If it wasn’t for this Hawks goaltender, we’d be talking about a Habs team that was tired of losing and finally did something about it. But we can’t say that because of &%$# Crawford.

More and more I’m understanding Leafs fans.

Canadiens caught fire right around the time Alexei Emelin belted a couple of Hawks in clean, old time, rugged fashion, and it was like a girlfriend’s knuckle sandwich on the kisser as the boys woke up, revved up, moved the puck in deep, stormed the net, moved the puck around smartly, caused havoc, and came close often.

But the guy from Chateauguay was there to shut the door.

The Canadiens, on any other night, might have won handily, but they didn’t and the slide continues. And the bottom line is, once again, aside from Paul Byron on this night, no one can put the puck in the net.

Montreal’s solid play in the second and third should give us hope. But unfortunately, their next two games involve St. Louis and Chicago in their barns, so I suppose we shouldn’t let hope get too much out of hand.

Random Notes:

Canadiens outshot the visitors 40-33 (with one lousy friggin goal to show for it).

The power play was 0/1.

Alex Galchenyuk seemed fired up and skated miles, and how great it would’ve been to see the guy provide some heroics after getting punched out by his girlfriend and reamed out by his boss. But the storybook heroics weren’t to be.

The other guy from the Sherbrooke St. love-in, Devante Smith-Pelly, was a healthy scratch.

Next up – Saturday in St. Louis.





Can’t Take Much More

The Canadiens fell 3-1 to the Pittsburgh Penguins on Saturday night at the Bell Centre and the dark journey down Mediocre Lane continues, even though they’d won their previous game against New Jersey.

My heart soars like the Hindenburg.


This was supposed to be the best Habs team in decades, with a decent shot at going deeper than usual in the playoffs. Folks were raving about them. Even the Toronto media mentioned them sometimes.

Now it’s a team that can’t score goals, the power play is ridiculously inept, and they can’t stay out of the penalty box. They’ve also lost 14 of their last 19 games, which is unbelievable. How can that be?

And if I wanted to carry on about this, which I don’t, I could mention passion, desire, will, work ethic, smarts, and anything else they currently lack that I could come up with.

Soon they could find themselves out of a playoff spot after being safe, sound, and smug atop the standings once upon a time, because everything was coming up roses in the beginning.

Fire the coach or pull off a blockbuster trade or feed them steroids or supply their wives with chastity belts. Whatever it takes.

Do something. My enthusiasm is waning.

Random Notes:

P.K. scored the lone Habs goal, his second of the season.

Mike Condon was terrific.

Montreal outshot the Pens 34-32.

Next up – Thursday, when the Hawks pay a visit.

Letters On My Shelf

Many of these letters were written to me, while some I collected along the way. If you find these boring, please don’t tell me.

Beginning with –

Red Fisher (1965) (after I complained to him that Stan Mikita swore at me when I asked him for his autograph at a Hawks-Leafs exhibition game in Peterborough during the Leafs training camp).


Phyllis King (1951) – Clarence Campbell’s secretary and future wife.


Here’s Clarence and Phyllis on their romantic date at the Forum, which helped spark the 1955 St. Patrick’s Day Richard Riot.


Legendary sports editor Elmer Ferguson (1929). The Elmer Ferguson Memorial Award is presented to outstanding hockey journalists and includes the likes of Jacques Beauchamp, Red Burnett, Trent Frayne, Red Fisher, Andy O’Brien, Michael Farber, Roy MacGregor and others.


Sam Pollock (1964). By far my favourite letter.

Claude Mouton (1985)

Irving Grundman (1983)

Almost three months to the day after General Manager Grundman wrote this letter, he was fired by the Canadiens and Serge Savard would take his place.

Forum secretary Manon Bruneau (1984)

Letter from Sam Pollock to Habs prospect Michel Lagace (1962). This is the kind of letter I would have liked to receive.


Looking for tickets at Maple Leaf Gardens (1965 & 1966)

Two replies from Claude Mouton (1983) about my request for a stick. He gave me a Bob Gainey stick, signed by the entire team, which I picked up at the Forum after driving from Ottawa after graveyard shift.

Jean Beliveau (1984)

I decided I needed an 8X10 glossy of the Rocket shaking hands with Sugar Jim Henry, so I went right to the top. I wrote a letter to La Presse and it ended up on the desk of editor-in chief Gerard Pelletier (1964)

Pelletier would later serve in the Pierre Trudeau government, and was eventually awarded the Order of Canada.

Frank Selke Jr. (1961)

Habs Snuff Out Sens


The Canadiens snapped their four-game losing streak by besting the Ottawa Senators 3-1 at the Bell, and Sens forward Mark Stone only grimaced in unimaginable pain four or five times during the contest.

Goals by Brian Flynn and Max Pacioretty in the first period (Max’s came with just 33 seconds left), and a Jeff Petry marker in the second did in the obnoxious nation’s capital representatives, and reporters in the Sens room said afterward that Stone could barely put on his street leotards.

Montreal outshot Ottawa 27-8 in the first period, which ties a team record for shots in one frame, but Ottawa would regroup at some point in the second and make a game of it, including a slightly worrisome goal by J-G Pageau after the home team held a 3-0 lead.

But it ended as a 3-1 win by the boys in red, and as Confucius once said when he was coaching the Chinese National Team many years ago, “He who wins feels better than he who loses.”

Twenty-seven shots in one period is a lot, of course. And no one would expect them to put up that sort of shot total in the second and third because in that case, they would’ve had a ridiculous 81 shots in all.

But even 81 shots wouldn’t be a record. Boston fired 83 in a game against Chicago netminder Sam LoPresti in 1941, and barely winning 3-2.

Canadiens ended with a terrific 42 shots to Ottawa’s mediocre 26 on Dustin Tokarski, who started his second straight game.

Next up – Tuesday, when the San Jose Sharks swim in.

High Times for Max And P.K.


For those who came here by mistake, don’t follow hockey, and are unsure of who’s who, Max is the one in the blue shirt.

Great news this week concerning P.K. Subban and Max Pacioretty. One who gave and one who received.

First with the Subbanator, who only a few days ago donated a cool ten million bucks (over seven years), to Montreal’s Children’s Hospital.

What a gesture by the 2015-16 Norris Trophy winner and key  member of next spring’s Stanley Cup-winning team. A big-hearted man of the people, and a guy with lots of money.

Rocket Richard gave to charities, visited hospitals, and accepted invitations to countless banquets, not only because certain duties were required, but because he truly loved kids. But in his day, if he’d handed over even a grand to a hospital, his house might have gone into foreclosure.

Whatever. Rocket then, P.K. now – it’s about caring and helping and loving kids and beating the shit out of the Leafs and Bruins.

We now tap our fingers and wait for Erik Karlsson to do something almost as good as what P.K. did. Is it possible? Or is P.K. truly one of a kind?

Maybe Patrick Kane might want to think about doing something like this too.


P.K. and the boys cast their votes, and Max Pacioretty was chosen by his buddies as Montreal’s newest wearer of the iconic C. A great honour and Max deserves it. He’s a class act on and off the ice, a dangerous sharpshooter, and obviously popular with his teammates.

Maybe his French leaves much to be desired, but hopefully some media folk and fans don’t get their shorts in a knot and just suck it up and let it be.

Habs fans missed having a captain last year, and now the letter is back in place. Max will look terrific when he accepts the Stanley Cup from wee Bettman next June.

Last year I sat with Max, Brendan Gallagher, Brandon Prust, and Tomas Plekanec at a table while they signed autographs, and while Prust and Plekanec hardly said a word and left as soon as they could, Max and Gally were as friendly as can be to all concerned, and stayed afterward and met people connected with the event.

Max’s dad and I have exchanged emails over the past several years, and I might sound like Don Cherry or Glenn Healy here, but I told Mr. Pacioretty a couple of years back that I thought his son would make a fine captain.

And because I mentioned Rocket’s house a few paragraphs ago, here’s a photo of it, situated in the north end of Montreal (Ahuntsic), where he raised a family while scaring the bejesus out of opposing forwards, defencemen, and goalies.

It’s a beautiful house on a corner lot, with a park and river across the street, and the main difference now, compared to when Maurice and his gang lived there, is the upper part, which is completely different than the original dwelling. That and different windows.

I took Lucy to see it, and she seemed impressed that it was Rocket’s house. I stress the word “seemed.”


Here’s the original if you feel like comparing.