Category Archives: Carey Price

Back In The Saddle Again

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The day began with Marc Bergevin dealing Hamilton Bulldogs multimillionaire Rene Bourque to Anaheim in exchange for 6’5″, 225 lb. defenceman Bryan Allen, and it ended with the Canadiens looking solid in their 4-1 win over the visiting St. Louis Blues.

The Bourque trade seems a fine move by the GM. Clear out what needed to be cleared out and shore up a less-than-rugged blueline corps while doing so. (Not to mention that Bourque still has another year left on his contract and big Allen doesn’t).

Maybe it’s also symbolic. The players know the fat is being trimmed, it’s a gradual tightening up a quarter way through the season, holes are being filled on defence (with Gonchar and Allen), Jiri Sekac is truly finding his place and giving Eller new life, and it’s onwards and upwards.

And as the important tweaks are made, the Canadiens, on a cold friggin night in Montreal, buried some beauties, while at the other end, Carey Price once again came up huge and allowed his team to get the job done.

After Vlad Tarasenko opened the scoring in the first period when he batted the floating puck past Price, Dale Weise in the second frame, again showing colour and character, intercepted a Kevin Shattenkirk clearing pass from behind the net, hesitated and calmly fired the puck over a sprawling Jake Allen.

Shortly after, P.A. Parenteau sprung Max with a beauty of a pass which Max buried, while in the third frame, Price shone, kept his team in front when called upon, and Max would notch his second of the game on a nice pass from DD, and Lars Eller would light the lamp after some great work from linemates Prust and Sekac.

A tremendous rebound game after being shutout 4-0 on Tuesday by Pittsburgh, with all four lines playing well and the defence, (with the help of Price) holding the fort.

It puts them back on track and looking impressive while doing so, and as Sportsnet’s Jason York said when the game ended, the Canadiens are showing that they are definitely for real and a force to be reckoned with (or words to that affect).

Now it’s a short jaunt down to Boston to meet the Bruins on Saturday night. The Canadiens have won seven of eight, and making it eight of nine in Boston would be a beautiful thing.

Like A Rolling Streak

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The Canadiens would score the game’s first three goals, which is more than unusual, and all three would be power play goals, which is even more unusual. To say the least.

And even thought the Philadelphia Flyers clawed back and made a game of it, the hometown gang ended up doubling the score and skated away with a big 6-3 win to extend their streak to five games.

Love those streaks. And of course we want more. We want six straight, and then seven, and then eight and maybe squeeze out nine or twelve because we’re a greedy bastards.

Greed. One of the seven deadly sins. Only acceptable when we’re talking about Montreal winning streaks. And way better than the other six deadly sins sloth, gluttony, embellishing, gooning, whining, and sucking, like Boston and Toronto.

Two power play goals in the first from Parenteau and DD, and then one from PK in the second, and hopefully now the man advantage woes have been sorted out and they’re off to the races.

A good power play can make a good team a great team if things are going well in most other areas. It’s what’s been missing in Montreal, and judging from this game and the previous Boston tilt, it’s coming around.

The Flyers would narrow it to 3-1 and then 3-2 with just 1:14 left in the second, and after Parenteau had given the boys a two-goal margin when he deflected a Sergei Gonchar shot from the point, the Flyers once again made things dicey when the puck sat within a crease scrum for what seemed like way too long, although the referee could see it the entire time.

It eventually scooted out and was driven home, and it was a 4-3 game and the Flyers had momentum. But Dale Weise, first with a five-hole shot that Ray Emery should’ve had, and then another when the puck bounced in off our man Lafleur Weise, and any thoughts the Flyers had of mounting a final comeback were laid to rest.

This by the guy who just last game had a Gordie Howe hat trick and a Rocket Richard home run, and tonight dropped a fine deuce.

Next it’s a relatively short jaunt on Sunday to Detroit to try and keep the streak going on. They can do it. They’ve got Dale Weise. And Carey Price.

Random Notes:

Philly outshot Montreal 29-28.

Habs point-getters included Plekanec, Gonchar, Max, and Markov with two assists each, Gachenyuk with three assists, Parenteau and Weise with two goals each, DD with a goal and an assist, and PK with a goal.

Brandon Prust  found himself in a decent scrap with Zac Rinaldo. I find it impressive that Rinaldo can make the switch from soccer to hockey like that. Don’t you?

A bit of a quiet night for two guys who’ve been burning it up lately, Eller and Sekac. And that’s fine. Others picked up the slack.

To think it was only six games ago, when Chicago pounded the Canadiens 5-0, that many of us were quite pissed at these guys.

The ole song was being sung in the second period. Hate that song.

 

 

Canadiens Stomp Bruins

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Imagine that. The Bruins thumped 6-1 in Toronto and 24 hours later smoked 5-1 by the Canadiens.

Take that, Bruins fans.

The Canadiens looked just fine on this night, a solid three periods led by the guy whose name was mentioned beforehand not for what he might accomplish, but for what Milan Lucic might accomplish.

Dale Weise was a ball of fire, a guy who came to play, and with his fight in the first period with Gregory Campbell, then seeing him tie the score in the second on a penalty shot and setting up Max later on, it all added up to a sensational Gordie Howe hat trick.

But I’ll take it one step further, because after all that, he later on crashed the Bruins net in serious fashion, so I’m gonna call it a Rocket Richard home run.

Very impressive, those crazy Habs, even though, as sure as Bob Dylan won’t be singing opera and not one winning number will be on my lottery ticket, the Canadiens wouldn’t hit the back of the net in the first period and once again fell behind.

They didn’t get down on themselves though. They were dominant for the most part, and the worrisome power play was sharp all night and would eventually click on the fifth try when Jiri Sekac made it 5-1. But I’m  ahead of myself here. Tons of stuff went down.

Max Pacioretty was flying all night, and after not scoring on a last minute, clear cut breakaway in the first period, would light the lamp in the second and again in the third.

Nathan Beaulieu found himself in a fight with Matt Fraser and clocked the Bruin with a right that sent the fellow to the room with a sore face, leaving Beaulieu to add ice to the hand. Fraser had goaded Beaulieu to drop ‘em, and such a mistake it was.

40-year old Sergei Gonchar, after just one practice and playing in his first game with the Habs after coming over from Dallas in the Moen trade, was solid and effective all evening, including on the power play where he showed poise and smarts, otherwise known as experience.

Tomas Plekanec pulled off the coolest little between-the-legs pass to Gally in the crease, but unfortunately it couldn’t be finished off. Looked great though.

Lars Eller notched his third goal in three games with a nifty backhand after great work by Gally. Eller’s a new man.

Pleks had a wide open net on a power play and hit the crossbar. But I think at that point we could all feel a power play goal was only a matter of time and it was.

PK stood up to Lucic after the big thug had levelled Sekac. Luckily nothing developed, but good on PK anyway.

Weise looked like Mike Bossy on the penalty shot goal.

Alexei Emelin bumped and thumped as he likes to do against the Bruins. It’s a beautiful thing when he’s rattling bones. Especially Beantown bones.

Alex Galchenyuk pulled off several very cool moves to once again give us a more hints of what’s in store for years to come.

And Carey Price continues to stop most everything and show once again that when he’s doing his thing, the team always has a chance to win.

Great game, tremendous result. And if you turn your TV or radio down and open the window, that sound you hear are Bruins fans everywhere grinding their teeth and pushing down little old ladies..

Random Notes:

Canadiens outshot Boston 34-22 and dominated much of the time.

The power play had a new feel to it. Therrien had two left handed blueliners, Markov and Gonchar, paired up, and two righties, Subban and Gilbert, for most of the five man-advantages.

Near the end, Nathan Beaulieu was rewarded for his fine play over the evening by getting some time on the power play as well. And it wasn’t just the d-men changing the environment. The power play units up front stormed the net, played like they were on a mission, and finally…..finally….Sekac scored after the team’s 28 previous attempts had proved futile.

Next up – Saturday when Philadelphia pays a visit.

 

Price’s Night Against Jets

Certainly a well-deserved shutout by Carey Price as he stopped the Winnipeg Jets cold in the Canadiens’ decent 3-0 win at the Bell.

Price must have had the Jets talking to themselves as he foiled almost sure goals a bunch of times, while at the other end, Lars Eller in the second and Alex Galchenyuk and Tomas Plekanec in the third lit the lamp, with Pleky’s being an empty-netter.

It was another night for the third line to shine, with Eller, Sekac, and Prust buzzing around the Jets’ goal all evening. Sekac, chosen second star on the night and his second straight game being one, continues to show he’s the real deal. It seems he and Eller have some serious chemistry going, and Brandon Prust must be happier than a pig in shit to have landed on this line and is adding to the said chemistry.

Others guys chipped in too. Brandon Gallagher caused havoc in the crease and Alex Galchenyuk flashed some serious moves. But often, especially from the Desharnais, Pacioretty, Parenteau trio, the chances to shoot were there and weren’t taken. Fancy moves don’t work all that often against NHL defencemen.

Speaking of defenceman, P.K. might want to to stay away from the moonshine. In the first period he lost the puck on the power play which led to a Jets breakaway, and he almost did the same thing in the second. All in all, he was a bit of a mess throughout. It’s weird how that happens with PK sometimes.

A fine win, Price’s first shutout of the season and his 26th overall, the team’s third win in a row after a brief slump, and now it’s a matter of the Bruins at the Bell on Thursday.

Gotta win that. We hate the Bruins.

Now, at the risk of seeming like a big friggin baby, I need to go to bed. Yes I’m a suck, but I need to be fresh so I can give my usual 140% at work tomorrow.

 

 

Sekac Outstanding In Habs Win

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Lapointe

It began with an emotional ceremony that saw Guy Lapointe’s number 5 raised to the rafters between his buddies Savard and Robinson.

And the game began like so many others, with the Canadiens not scoring and looking befuddled in the process, relying on Carey Price to keep them in it once again.

But in the second and third they were the team we’ve been craving to see. A team that suddenly found cohesion and speed, with the top three lines dangling and creating chances, and the fourth line punching the clock and sometimes coming close to adding to the festivities, as in Dale Weise ringing one off the crossbar.

And as much as it was a night for Guy Lapointe and a big win that just might boot this group out of the doldrums (I said “might”), it was a coming out party for Jiri Sekac, a healthy scratch for the last seven games, who scored a goal and added an assist and named first star of the night.

If this is what we’re going to see instead of the usual Rene Bourque effort, maybe we could buy Bourque the odd coffee and hot dog as our way of saying thank you for the great games he last played. Last spring.

A big, important, and impressive win on Guy Lapointe night. Imagine if the Canadiens were embarrassed on this special occasion. But they weren’t, and it was a happy night at the Bell for the home team, the hometown fans, and hopefully Mr. Lapointe, who happens to be a scout for the Wild.

The Canadiens got on the scoreboard first, something not often seen, when Gally wired one over the shoulder of Wild goaltender Darcy Kuemper, and after the Wild had evened things up, Lars Eller, with 50 seconds left in the period put the boys ahead again.

In the third, it was Sekac and then Max, and Minnesota was done like dinner.

Two goals in the second, two in the third. A great forty minutes. Now if they can only start scoring in the first. And if they can continue what they started.

Random Notes:

The Sekac, Eller and Prust line combined for 6 points  – Sekac a goal and an assist, Eller a goal and an assist, and Prust, who was outstanding in this game, adding 2 assists.

Other point-getters – Gally and Max with a goal each, and Pleky, Parenteau, and DD with assists.

Next up – Tuesday, when Winnipeg pays a visit.

 

Habs Hear The Boos

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They were doing so well too. A whack of wins in October. Then…….

First Period:

In spite of the fact the Canadiens looked swell and outshot the visiting Chicago Blackhawks 11-5, they of course fell behind 1-0 because that’s what they do. Fall behind. Or at least in 11 of the 13 games they’ve been in.

They had some fine chances too. Parenteau. DD. I’m sure there were others too. It’s all too hazy. But no one scored because that’s what they do. They wait for the other team to score first.

I like what they’re doing. They’re so good they’ve decided to spot other teams a goal, just like we did when we were kids and we had a ringer on our team.

Neat play of the period? Carey Price lunging by the crossbar to push a floating puck away.

Second Period:

Unlike the first period, the Canadiens were a bit of a mess as Chicago outshot the boys 17-8.

2-0 Hawks on a weird bounce. My dedicated Habs fan wife is now reading Facebook.

Neat play of the period – Price sticking his paddle out to stop a Marian Hossa shot.

Not-so-neat play of the period – P.K. Subban nullifying (screwing) his team’s power play by taking a dumb holding penalty.

Not-so-neat play of the period, part two – Tom Gilbert letting his stick fly around into a Hawk player’s face and getting a double minor with just under 4 minutes left in the period.

That sinking feeling is giving me indigestion.

Third Period:

P.K. Subban covered his man in front of the net the way Tomas Kaberle would and presto, his man, Brad Richards, made it 3-0 visitors.

4-0.

Neat play of the period – boos from the crowd.

5-0.

Random Notes:

Tonight (Wednesday) in Buffalo. The Sabres are way down in the basement. Which doesn’t mean a thing of course.

Will the Canadiens score first? Will they score on the power play? Will they score? The answers, my friends, are blowing in the wind.

Humbled At Home

Saying the Canadiens were lousy is pretty well all that needs to be said about the 6-2 loss to the Calgary Flames at the Bell Centre.

The Flames were excellent, the Habs weren’t. Montreal was outworked, outskated, outsmarted, gave up plenty of giveaways, and it was all capped off by the Flames fifth goal coming after P.K. fell down.

An embarrassing night for the CH, and this business of the other team usually scoring first is more than tiresome. The madness has to stop. Come-from-behind wins eventually slow down to a crawl. Like now.

Don’t look now but the team has lost their last three of four, so if it’s not a full-fledged slump, it could be very soon. It’s time for some soul-searching. I know it’s early but slumps are slumps and when the team is about to enter one, it’s depressing whether it’s early or later on.

They didn’t play well in Western Canada and it continues in their first game back at home. They need to play much better than this and it certainly can’t be hard. They just need to look at tapes of this game and do the opposite.

Random Notes:

Calgary outshot Montreal 19-4 in the first period, which is unacceptable to say the least. The great October run must have given the boys swelled heads.

Overall shots on goal – Calgary 36, Montreal 20.

Rene Bourque finally scored, which puts him on track for a 7-goal season. Max got the other. (Late-breaking correction – Bourque’s goal was given to Lars Eller later on, so forget the 7 goal thing).

Next up – the Hawks are in town on Tuesday. Time to stop the nonsense.

 

Small Habs Aura Thought

If you hate the Habs, you might want to stop reading right about now. Although if you hate the Habs, you’re probably not on this page anyway.

Fans of teams in western Canada must really like it when the boys come to town. I’m pretty sure about that. I used to think it would bug the hell out of them with all the Canadiens sweaters in the crowd and loud cheers and such, but now I think these folks like it, even if they’re ashamed of themselves for liking it.

There’s a cool aura about the Habs, although many say otherwise. It comes up all the time about how the aura is gone. It’s hard to hear that. People who say this sort of thing aren’t taking our feelings into consideration.

This is the team many of these western fans’ moms or dads, aunts or uncles, grandmas or grandpas cheered for, and it doesn’t matter that they themselves grew up preferring Lanny McDonald or the Sedins, they’re screwed and they come by it naturally.

The Canadiens are in their bloodstream and unless they go to Switzerland and get a complete oil change like Keith Richards apparently did, there’s nothing they can do about it.

Of course they want their team to kick ass. But it’s a special visit anyway.

 

 

 

Two Points In Calgary

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I’d like to thank Rene Roy in Halifax for searching stores there and finding these two Peps which he sent me right away, and which came on Tuesday whereas I ate one just minutes later.

Can’t find them anywhere in Montreal. Couldn’t find them anywhere in Kingston either. But Rene found two in Halifax.

Canadiens in Calgary after getting whupped 3-0 Monday by the boys 3 hours north up Highway 2.  I used to drive parts of that number 2 when I drove semis out of Calgary. It’s a dangerous stretch. Too flat. Too much wind. Too many cows to distract you.

Oh, you’re saying, he used to drive semis? Yes I did, for 20 years. 14 in Ontario, 6 in Alberta, from the mid-1970s to mid-’90s. Was never all that crazy about it, and I was never able to figure out how to be a trucker who worked out of the house.

Again it’s a late puck drop. 9:00 eastern. I surrender.

First Period:

Three Habs penalties. Two Habs power plays.

0-0 after 1. Is that interesting?

Second Period:

1-0 Flames when a nice shot by Mark Giordano, who looks like he needs to shave about three times a day, beat Price after mass confusion led to big trouble.

The team is way out of sync. Nothing’s going right. They’re playing like they had a liquid lunch at Dusty’s Saloon, a place where I once chatted with Louis Sutter, dad of the Sutter boys, when we stood side by side at the urinals.

That happened to me one other time when Vancouver billionaire tycoon Jim Pattison and I peed side by side at urinals in a wholesale food warehouse.

1-1! Tom Gilbert out of the blue, with nice work from Rene Bourque, a man not usually known for his digging in the trenches. Habs fans at the Saddledome sing ole ole soon after.

I’m a non-ole type of guy. I wish someone would blow the song up.

Flames are outshooting Montreal 25-11. And the Canadiens power play continues to be pathetic. They should hang their heads.

Third Period:

Three Canadiens in the box late in the period, but the boys now need to buy Price a steak dinner.  He’s saved their bacon a bunch of times. Too many penalties in this game, and the Edmonton affair, including an Emelin trip to the sinbin with just 2:13 left.

The Flames had seven power plays but failed miserably. Thanks to Price and Price only.

Overtime:

Back and forth they went, 4 on 4, and it was mostly Price once again. No goals, and in the shootout, P.A. Parenteau got it done and the team heads over the Rockies to Vancouver with two points in their pocket.

Random Notes:

The Flames outshot Canadiens 38-19.

Game time Thursday in Vancouver – 10 freakin o’clock.

Habs Chuggin’ Along

It was a simple enough game plan. Beat Henrik Lundqvist and the New York Rangers, the team that ended the boys’ playoff hopes and dreams last spring.

Win and it would mean a breathtaking 7 wins and 1 loss out of the gate.

And win the Montreal Canadiens did, with a score of 3-1 over the visiting Blueshirts, and now it’s the big silver bird west to Edmonton on Monday, Calgary Tuesday, and Vancouver on Thursday.

It’s a good thing the western swing begins in Alberta and not Vancouver. The West Coast is preparing to batten down the hatches for hurricane-type weather, and a hurricane outside and a Habs hurricane inside just wouldn’t be fair to the locals.

Carey Price was brilliant on numerous occasions on this Saturday night at the Bell. His glove hand flew out like a striking snake,  with more than a handful of Rangers’ quick and close-in shots swallowed up by Price’s trapper.

It was Price’s show, not Lundqvist’s. All part of the perfect game plan.

Finally the Canadiens would open the scoring, something they had managed only one other time in this early part of the season. And it was done in style when Tomas Plekanec and Max Pacioretty, on the ice killing a penalty, found themselves with a clear-cut two on nothing breakaway.

After four passes back and forth, Pleky finished off what had amounted to a perfect and unstoppable play.

1-1 after the first. 2-1 in the second when Lars Eller notched his first goal of the season. And in the third frame, after Eller hit the post, Dale Weise would dig the puck out to Max and the Rangers were sunk.

The Canadiens in general were solid, the Eller, Weise, Bourque combo made an impact, Price was amazing when he had to be, and Max made things count on the all-important first and third goals. But it’s a team game and plenty of guys punched the clock and made it work.

Makes my chest swell. Kind of makes it level with my stomach.

Such an impressive start to the season. Keep it rolling on the western swing to close out October and make this an absolute month to remember.